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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just wondering what everyone's thoughts are on this, and why. thanks.
 

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Unfortunately because we have an irresponsible, throwaway society, kill shelters are a necessary evil. No-kill shelters are great, but they are always full. Where do the extra animals end up?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by QueenOfThePride
Unfortunately because we have an irresponsible, throwaway society, kill shelters are a necessary evil. No-kill shelters are great, but they are always full. Where do the extra animals end up?
:

Now, if you are asking where you should get your pet from, I would probably say that it is in your own best interest to adopt from a no-kill shelter (or some other type of no-kill rescue group) While it is tempting to want to "save" a dog on death-row, it is more important that you get a dog you will be able to keep for life. And most no-kill shelters (& foster rescues) have a screening process and spend more time getting to know the animal so that you have a much better chance of finding an adoptable pet.

And any animal you adopt will open up another space. No-kill shelters, rescues, foster, etc. often keep an eye on shelter kill-dates and try to pull animals out in time if they have the space. Some shelters from "better" areas will even take dogs from areas that are more overrun. (I know in my area we often get van loads of dogs rescued from puppy-mills in the mid-west)
 

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I work with a "no-kill" rescue organization. We're primarily GSD, though. And we definitely DO keep an eye out on the local kill shelters, who has GSD's, when they're scheduled to be put down, etc. If we have room, if we can get foster homes, and if we think that they can be re-homed we pull them out as fast as we can. The problem is space and money. Unfortunately, and it really breaks my heart every time, we can't save every single abandoned GSD out there - let alone every single dog.

I would agree that if you're thinking of adopting, go through a rescue organization as they will have a lot of resources to help you. We offer training classes as part of the adoption package. It will be more expensive through a rescue, though. Shelters often charge $50.00 or so, while we charge anywhere from $150.00 to $250.00. May seem like a lot for a rescue, but that price barely covers the dog's expenses with us. Most of the workers (including me) are volunteer. So, the money is used primarily on the dogs and their care.

If you do go the shelter route ... take someone knowledgable with you about dogs and their behaviours. A lot of shelter dogs go straight back into the shelter after a few months.
 

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I think that the concept of no-kill shelters is great, but unfortunately a no-kill must either a) only accept dogs that they know they can adopt out easily (so they can't take dogs with problems, etc.) or b) fill up with unadoptable dogs that take up spaces and mean that adoptable dogs must be turned away. There's often a lot of political pressure to be no-kill, but there's no easy way out of the above problems.

The shelter near us is as close to no-kill as they can possibly get; animals are allowed to stay for months and sometimes years. But in order to do that they've had to expand and expand and expand, and now have an enormous "inventory" of animals that may never leave. And because of the higher carrying cost, adoptions now cost $225 per dog and over a hundred a cat. That, unfortunately, puts off the uneducated adopter, who may well be a perfectly decent home but just can't wrap their brains around paying that much for a shelter dog. So the problem can be compounded.

I don't know that I come down on the side of either; each has its own tragedies.
 

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The problem I have with no-kill shelters is the unavoidable wharehousing of dogs. In theory its great b/c it makes me very sad and mad that soooo many dogs are euthanized every year but living one's life out in a kennel situation is not a good life in my opinion. I know that many no-kill organizations have foster programs and some are really god but some also just wharehouse the dogs in outside kennels on their property. The thought of my dog spending her life like that make me more upset than a humane death.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by QueenOfThePride
Unfortunately because we have an irresponsible, throwaway society, kill shelters are a necessary evil. No-kill shelters are great, but they are always full.


It's sad but true. I remember watching a programme on TV once about a no-kill shelter, they had tonnes and tonnes of animals, a lot we're old racing grey hounds and some had been there for years and years, literally some had been there for 12yrs +, spending life in a cage for years feeling no real sence of belonging or affection is a far worse outcome than being put down, as nasty as it sounds.... In an ideal world, all animals would have good homes, none would be left to wait in cages or be put down.... But this isn't an ideal world.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i myself would like to see more kill shelters, the shelter in my area houses cats and dogs for years and years. the cat and dog that have been there longest become the sheltor mascots. no, they don't get a home, they still sit in there kennels. it's so bad our local shelter has a 3 year waiting list for new animals. i would not like to see my dog live his life in this way, so that's why i'm for kill shelters. plus there are a lot of unadoptable dogs in the shelter. lots of violent pits and labs, but they just sit there in their kennels. i have adopted two dogs from my local shelter. the rest of my pets are rescue pets from owners that no longer want them.
 
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