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Killer at college: Meningitis threatens students<br><br>
Mandatory vaccine for deadly bacterial disease sparks debate<br><br><a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20519953/" target="_blank">http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20519953/</a>
 

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It is different now because there is a vaccine and we all know that we must start fearing it if there is a vaccine available for it! In this particular article I think it mentions that meningitis strikes fewer than 3,000 persons in the US annually...then goes on to say that 1.25 per 1 million reportedly suffer from GBS...now correct me if I am wrong but does one not have a better chance of suffering from GBS than from actually suffering from meningitis? 3,000 annually in the US is sure as hell less than 1.25 per million.
 

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yeah, a GF's DD HAD to get a menin vax in order to get a dorm room<br>
WTH?<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lokidoki</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9092726"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">In this particular article I think it mentions that meningitis strikes fewer than 3,000 persons in the US annually...then goes on to say that 1.25 per 1 million reportedly suffer from GBS...now correct me if I am wrong but does one not have a better chance of suffering from GBS than from actually suffering from meningitis? 3,000 annually in the US is sure as hell less than 1.25 per million.</div>
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You also have to weigh out how many of the cases of meningitis happen with the vaccine serotypes. AND then figure out what the increased risk is for non-vaccine serotypes when you vax for the rest. (for some reason the CDC doesn't like to crunch the numbers on that aspect. )<br><br>
So...if we have 1.25 cases of GBS per 1 million doses, how many doses are in the series? How many people is the vaccine recommended for? Everyone between the ages of 11 and 23? How many doses is that?<br><br>
Is the 1.25 cases per million doses an under-reporting? Does the "only 10% of reactions get reported" rule apply to GBS?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lokidoki</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9092726"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It is different now because there is a vaccine and we all know that we must start fearing it if there is a vaccine available for it! In this particular article I think it mentions that meningitis strikes fewer than 3,000 persons in the US annually...then goes on to say that 1.25 per 1 million reportedly suffer from GBS...now correct me if I am wrong but does one not have a better chance of suffering from GBS than from actually suffering from meningitis? 3,000 annually in the US is sure as hell less than 1.25 per million.</div>
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Uh, is my basic math wrong?<br><br>
GBS = 1.25/1,000,000 = .0000012<br><br>
meningitis = 3,000/300,000,000 = .00001<br><br>
So, meningitis is more likely.<br><br>
[Current population in U.S. is a little over 300,000,000]
 

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I remember reading elsewhere that the vaccine doesn't contain serotype B, even though that serotype the most common cause of meningococcal meningitis in the US<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ASusan</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9093210"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Uh, is my basic math wrong?<br><br>
GBS = 1.25/1,000,000 = .0000012<br><br>
meningitis = 3,000/300,000,000 = .00001<br><br>
So, meningitis is more likely.<br><br>
[Current population in U.S. is a little over 300,000,000]</div>
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But it's 1.25 cases of GBS per 1 million <i>doses of menactra</i>, not 1.25 per million "people in the US".
 

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How many cases of "meningitis" are actually bacterial meningitis? Are they lumping in viral meningitis (which is usually mild and self limiting) in the total "meningitis" numbers?
 

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The results of that poll are <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: 80+% want *mandatory* vaccination. Ugh.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mamakay</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9093592"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">But it's 1.25 cases of GBS per 1 million <i>doses of menactra</i>, not 1.25 per million "people in the US".</div>
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Right, that I understood ~ but doesn't it still seem like you have a better chance of getting GBS from the vax than actually suffering from meningitis.<br><br>
I agree ~ would be interesting to note if the under-reporting rule applies to this as well ~ if the GBS is under-reported then really what is the benefit of getting a vax that is supposedly 83% effective...and doesn't cover all of the strains.<br><br>
Interesting. Wouldn't it really make sense to weigh all of this information in before making it mandatory? This is where I begin to think that all they are seeing is $$$ ~ because if they were truly wanting to <i>protect</i> anyone they would research these type of risks.
 

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I was in college about 5 years ago living in dorms.. they had me sign a waiver that I refuse to get it and they tried to scare me into it. Didn't work then and won't work now. I came out fine and no outbreaks on my campus of over 35000 students.
 

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I got this vaccine voluntarily before entering my freshman year 6 years ago. We had a meningitis outbreak my junior year in the dorms. The student almost died (I think he's paralyzed now though, really sad...) less than 48 hours from the onset of symptoms (which aren't very obvious- headache and stiff neck?!). Those who lived in his dorm or he had had contact with were treated and given the vaccine just in case (voluntarily of course...) The student health center actually ran out of the vaccine and had to have more shipped in. I would get the vaccine again (you can preach about nutrition all day, but the majority of those kids live on pizza and beer regardless) and I'm going to highly recommend it to my children if they want to live in the dorms. It's hard to practice good hygiene when you share a bathroom and showers with at least 50 other people, many of which puke in the shower stalls and some that also defecate in them (in the boys dorms...).
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>holly6737</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9094442"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I got this vaccine voluntarily before entering my freshman year 6 years ago. We had a meningitis outbreak my junior year in the dorms. The student almost died (I think he's paralyzed now though, really sad...) less than 48 hours from the onset of symptoms (which aren't very obvious- headache and stiff neck?!). Those who lived in his dorm or he had had contact with were treated and given the vaccine just in case (voluntarily of course...) The student health center actually ran out of the vaccine and had to have more shipped in. I would get the vaccine again (you can preach about nutrition all day, but the majority of those kids live on pizza and beer regardless) and I'm going to highly recommend it to my children if they want to live in the dorms. It's hard to practice good hygiene when you share a bathroom and showers with at least 50 other people, many of which puke in the shower stalls and some that also defecate in them (in the boys dorms...).</div>
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Actually, the symptoms of meningitis <i>are</i> pretty obvious. Extreme headache and stiff neck that causes severe pain when you attempt to put your chin to your chest. It's not like you just get a headache and then you die from meningitis.<br><br>
I agree that college kids don't tend to eat right, but there's a difference between offering a vaccine to them and <i>mandating</i> one. Besides, you're missing the whole point when people talk about nutrition. You don't seem to understand how meningitis works and how vaccines work. Vaccines only prevent <i>certain</i> serotypes of certain bacteria from causing meningitis. When you put those specific bacteria out of the running, the other serotypes just step it up. This is talked about here all the time. You really ought to look into serotype replacement before you decide a meningococcal vaccine is going to help anyone.<br><br>
The meningococcal vaccine doesn't even protect against the one serotype that causes the MOST cases of meningococcal meningitis. Serotype B causes around 50% of meningococcal meningitis cases and isn't even in the vaccine. If you knock out the other types, you might just be making room for B to become more common. It happened with Hib vaccine. It happened with Prevnar. Why should this be any different? If you have no answer, no response, no clue -if you don't even know what serotype replacement is or how it works, then how can you argue the topic? You need to understand the basics before you recommend a vaccine to <i>anyone</i>. If you don't know what serotype replacement is, what causes it, how it works, how it might effect your children, why would you recommend this vaccine to them? Without even understanding the basics surrounding the issue, how could you honestly tell them it's a good idea? You don't have enough information to make that determination!
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">I got this vaccine voluntarily before entering my freshman year 6 years ago. We had a meningitis outbreak my junior year in the dorms. The student almost died</td>
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An "outbreak" of meningitis with <i>one</i> student getting meningitis?
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>holly6737</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9094442"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would get the vaccine again (you can preach about nutrition all day, but the majority of those kids live on pizza and beer regardless) and I'm going to highly recommend it to my children if they want to live in the dorms. It's hard to practice good hygiene when you share a bathroom and showers with at least 50 other people, many of which puke in the shower stalls and some that also defecate in them (in the boys dorms...).</div>
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I'm sorry - but saying that college students can't be trusted to practice good hygiene and should therefore get vaxed is like saying all boys and girls can't be trusted to wash under their foreskins and should be circumcised. It just doesn't make sense and isn't true.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Plummeting</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9094856"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Actually, the symptoms of meningitis <i>are</i> pretty obvious. Extreme headache and stiff neck that causes severe pain when you attempt to put your chin to your chest. It's not like you just get a headache and then you die from meningitis.<br><br>
I agree that college kids don't tend to eat right, but there's a difference between offering a vaccine to them and <i>mandating</i> one. Besides, you're missing the whole point when people talk about nutrition. You don't seem to understand how meningitis works and how vaccines work. Vaccines only prevent <i>certain</i> serotypes of certain bacteria from causing meningitis. When you put those specific bacteria out of the running, the other serotypes just step it up. This is talked about here all the time. You really ought to look into serotype replacement before you decide a meningococcal vaccine is going to help anyone.<br><br>
The meningococcal vaccine doesn't even protect against the one serotype that causes the MOST cases of meningococcal meningitis. Serotype B causes around 50% of meningococcal meningitis cases and isn't even in the vaccine. If you knock out the other types, you might just be making room for B to become more common. It happened with Hib vaccine. It happened with Prevnar. Why should this be any different? If you have no answer, no response, no clue -if you don't even know what serotype replacement is or how it works, then how can you argue the topic? You need to understand the basics before you recommend a vaccine to <i>anyone</i>. If you don't know what serotype replacement is, what causes it, how it works, how it might effect your children, why would you recommend this vaccine to them? Without even understanding the basics surrounding the issue, how could you honestly tell them it's a good idea? You don't have enough information to make that determination!</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">:
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">We had a meningitis outbreak my junior year in the dorms. The student almost died (I think he's paralyzed now though, really sad...) less than 48 hours from the onset of symptoms (which aren't very obvious- headache and stiff neck?!). Those who lived in his dorm or he had had contact with were treated and given the vaccine just in case (voluntarily of course...) The student health center actually ran out of the vaccine and had to have more shipped in.</td>
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did they do testing to see what type of meningitis he had, and make sure the vaccine they were administering actually had anything to do with what he had? I would be pleasantly surprised if this were so. Or if anyone knew enough to ask that before voluntarily receiving a vaccine.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>tuansprincess</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9095206"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm sorry - but saying that college students can't be trusted to practice good hygiene and should therefore get vaxed is like saying all boys and girls can't be trusted to wash under their foreskins and should be circumcised. It just doesn't make sense and isn't true.</div>
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Really? Have you been to college?
 
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