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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to find a fun, creative outlet for my DD, something that can result in a finished product...and I have tons of yarn!<br><br>
I was considering a knifty knitter loom, or something similar, you know, the ring with the pegs? I remember doing this as a kid with a wood ring and nails, but I can't remember how easy this is. My DD is good with fine motor skills, but since I don't really remember how it works does anyone have any idea if it's too complicated for a kid her age? (she will be 6 in Feb)<br><br>
I thought about this <a href="http://www.magiccabin.com/product.asp?section_id=2001&department=1404&search_type=category&search_value=5402&cm_val=&cm_pos=&cur_index=1&cm_type=&pcode=433" target="_blank">little mushroom one</a>, but that almost seems too simple, and seems to only make a rope?<br><br>
Thanks in advance for any input!
 

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I don't have a six year old yet so I don't really know if it would be difficult for her, but I have a Knifty Knitter (my brother randomly gave me a Knifty Knitter kit with yarn to make legwarmers) and it's SUPER easy. If she's interested in hats, scarves, and legwarmers she could really make all three with the same basic stitch. The kit I was given is aimed at children so it had very very basic and easy to follow instructions. It's pretty much like wrap a peg, pull yarn over, wrap a peg, pull yarn over, repeat till it's long enough, bind off, bam, you have legwarmers.
 

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Knifty knitters are basically just large gauge inexpensive knitting looms. I knit on both needles and knitting looms. I wouldn't necessarily say knitting looms are "easier," but they do require a slightly different skill set, that is suited for some people who have problems with needle kitting.<br><br>
Needle knitting requires both hands to be active, so someone with impaired mobility in one of their hand can not knit with needles. However, one can loom knit with just one hand.<br><br>
Most needle knitting instruction, directions and patterns are written in a very audio/sequential manner. Where as loom knitting tend to be much more logical and visual/spacial. It's more obvious the way the stitches are formed etc. Loom knitting leads to a deeper understanding of the mechanics of knitting than needle knitting does.<br><br>
If you do get knifty knitters, throw out the instructions. There are great instructions for loom knitting on line. If you use the instructions that come with the knifty knitters, you will get lumpy twisted stitches.<br><br>
The little mushrooms produce nothing but mile of I-cord. While I-cord has it's place, it isn't terribly useful.<br><br>
There are advantages to needle knitting when it comes to very complex shaping, which is a bit harder to do on a loom.
 

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Go for it! I remember doing that too when I was a kid (and joyfully made miles and miles of i-cord, lol), and I must have been around that age. I definitely don't think it would be too tricky for a 5-6 yr old.
 

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I have a Knifty knitter round spool loom one for my daughter. (I think I know the mushroom one you are talking about--with four little wire hoops, right? I saw one of those in a catalog after I had already bought the knifty knitter.)<br><br>
The one I have is similar, only it more pegs, 8 on one side and 12 on the other I think, and it's a pink plastic. It says on the package that it's for making straps for other things (like purses) or so on. So it does basically make a whole bunch of big i-cord.<br><br>
Anyway--my daughter just turned 4 and she is able to use this somewhat--she has pretty good fine motor skills and has no problem looping the bottom loop over the top with the little tool provided. Wrapping the yarn is a little harder but I am pretty sure that a 5-6 year old can manage that. In our case I got it for her in hopes that she would just have something of her own to mess with involving yarn and would let ME knit in peace!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
As to what it makes--well, it makes a pretty good animal tail on the large end with a nice fluffy yarn!! Other than that--you are going to have to do something with it to finish it into something. I am planning on sewing a big i-cord that we made together into a basket and felting it. I am thinking that I may try to do some other felting projects with wool yarn and i-cord--sewing it around and making coasters, trivets, etc.
 

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I love my Knifty Knitter... I have them all. They come in several different sizes, both round and very long and straight. The KK is simple to learn to use and even my son learned how to make hats, scarves etc when he was 5..... What I do recommend is buying extra little 'hooker things' The piece you hold in your hand, We are forever loosing ours. That pc is only $1. It now takes my well skilled 9yr old ds a little over an hr to make a KK hat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the replies! You have all convinced me, I'm getting her one. I'm sure my 10yo will like it too!
 

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Has anyone taught a younger child to crochet? My DS (5) is convinced I should teach him and keeps asking. I am going to get him the biggest hook I can find and see..<br><br>
we have one of those knitting mushrooms but he isn't interested in it.
 
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