Mothering Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,<br>
We had DS rast tested for peanut, on the recommendation of our allergist<br>
A little history: DS reacted to peanut when he was 11 months old and the daycare he was attending gave him a peanut butter cracker. The reaction involved facial swelling and we considered it anaphalactic as he had a hive on his hand too.<br>
After that incident, we saw an allergist who did a SPT (positive), got an epi-pen, and pulled him from daycare. Since then, my husband and I have worked opposite shifts so one of us is always with him. About 5 months after the initial reaction, ds was at the Y day care while my husband worked out, and he was, again, given a peanut butter cracker. He did have a reaction. I was not there to see it but DH said he was starting to swell, so he gave him benedryl. He worried about waiting too long on the epi, so he administered that as well. The reaction stopped right away.<br>
OK, so fast forward to now. It's been almost 2 years since that second reaction.<br>
Since then, as far as we know, he has not been exposed to peanut. However, he used to suffer from severe eczema. About 6 months ago, it disappeared, almost overnight. It has not recurred and his skin is perfect now (knock on wood), except for some slight scarring behind his knees where we never could control the eczema before.<br>
So, our allergist suggested a RAST test to at least give us a baseline number. We got the results Friday.<br>
Peanut was .38<br>
According to the allergist, under .4 warrants a challenge (does that sound right??)<br>
HOWEVER, he would rather be safe than sorry (I love my allergist). So, he wants to wait another year, then do another rast and see what it looks like. Then, he wants to do another SPT. If that is negative, then we will talk about challenging.<br>
So, while I would love to do a challenge now and get it out of the way, I think that is definitely the safe plan.<br>
Another year of epi-pen carrying and avoidance won't be so bad, right?<br><br>
So, does that sound like a reasonable plan with those results? The allergist says it looks like ds is on the track to outgrowing...is that possible?<br><br><br>
Does anyone know what the numbers on the RAST test mean? This is the first one we've had.<br><br>
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
I'm not too good with RAST numbers, so I can't comment on that part...but I have heard that its common to do the RAST...if thats low then you can do an SPT...then if thats neg do a challenge in the Drs office. Apparently you can get a neg RAST but still have a pos SPT....I think waiting another year sounds like a good idea....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
i have no clue about the numbers, but from what im reading here and on other boards every allergist is different.<br><br>
my dd is 15 months old and has reacted to soy, dairy, and eggs. they did the SPT first, then did the RAST to get a baseline. the SPT came up positive almost immediately for both, in fact the serum made her get hives on her belly where her arm had brushed it. however the RAST was negative for dairy and "very low" for eggs (they didnt test soy because i wasnt sure at that point that she was allergic). they said at her age SPT and reaction is a better gage of allergy than RAST.<br><br>
they also said, as a precaution, to keep her away from all nuts, fish, and shellfish until she is 4 or 5. they said that keeping dd away from possible allergens will lessen the chances of her having allergies to those foods when she is, in fact, exposed to them. so based on the fact that the RAST test wasnt even all that accurate for my dd because her allergy is pretty obvious but the RAST said she is hardly allergic at all, i think your plan of waiting another year sounds good. you wouldnt want to take a chance on having another reaction since the number is so close to the allergists cutoff.<br><br>
as far as outgrowing the allergies, yes it is possible <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">. our allergist said that most kids outgrow their allergies and the best way to help that happen is avoidance. thats why they did the RAST test on my dd, to get a baseline for her numbers so they would see if she could possibly outgrow the allergy (i guess low numbers = higher chance of outgrowing allergy). also, then they could compare the numbers at her next visit and see if they went down. of course in my dd's case its going to be all messed up since her RAST numbers were pretty much negative anyway <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll">
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top