Mothering Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<p>I've made ketchup and mayonaise lacto-fermented before. They tasted great, were extra healthy, and the bacteria helped act as a preservative to prolong their shelf life. But they called for whey.</p>
<p>If I wanted to make lacto-fermented foods with different bacterial cultures, could I add some kombucha or water kefir to the mayo or ketchup or whatever to make them lacto-fermented? Or does it only work with whey?</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,488 Posts
<p>You don't need to use a starter at all, at least for most ferments.  Some of the fruit ferments are different, but I've made: NT ketchup and mustard, kimchee (love it), carrots, miscellaneous veggies, and pickles without dairy or any other starter.  Bacteria from the air and/or the veggie surface are sufficient.  There are lactobacillus bacteria lots of places, they got the name by noticing and isolating them first in dairy products (thus the lacto- prefix) but the type of bacteria are common, and lots of traditional fermenting, think pickles or sauerkraut or kimchee, didn't use dairy. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>There's a long thread in this forum, Fermenting Veggies (or is it Vegetables? look for the word Fermenting and lots of replies, say > 100 replies to the thread) it discusses the whole issue a lot more thoroughly and succinctly than NT or Wild Fermentation (love WF, the thread's just quicker). </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
<p><br>
Your response is so off-topic that I wonder if you are merely trying to advertise your website.</p>
<p> </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>JonyLeaber</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1284249/lacto-fermented-non-dairy-foods#post_16109168"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>The intake of dairy calcium has a profound influence on how easily an individual gains or sheds body fat. A high intake of dairy-based calcium not only protects against body fat accumulation, it enables a person to utilize (burn) more fat for energy. The best source of calcium that provides this beneficial effect on fat metabolism is low-fat, protein-rich dairy foods.<br><br>
Here's what's on my shopping list:<br>
skim milk<br>
low-fat yogurt<br>
cottage cheese<br><br>
If you'd like a free fat burning foods chart, I put one together that you can download for free on mcnewsletters.com. If you have any other quesitons, feel free to fire away.</p>
</div>
</div>
<br><br>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
<p>I do lacto-fermented veggies without whey all the time. For some reason, I thought ketchup, mayo, and mustard would need whey to lacto-ferment. If you have a good recipe for these that doesn't require whey, please fire away. I don't have access to NT (though its on my wish list for this Holiday season), so I can't just look it up.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>And yes, I know dairy is good for you. There just are people who can't have dairy.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,702 Posts
<p>For most things you can use just salt but other things work too--for example a few water kefir grains or water kefir can work in some cases (I used water kefir a few months ago to make a LF salsa).  If you have a chance, see if you can get the book Wild Fermentation from the library--lots of recipes that don't use whey.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>And just a thought on the off topic discussion...nettle infusion is an excellent source of non-dairy calcium as well as a number of other vitamins and minerals :)</p>
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top