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My grandmother was a twin born at home in 1905. She became an RN and PhT. Her daughter, my mother, was a forceps baby born in 1933 with the benefit of Twilight Sleep, scopolamine-morphine. My grandmother swore by this anesthesia. She said it was the best! Today, when we read about the transition from home to hospital, we are lead to believe that this benefitted women. Did it? As a PhT, most of my grandmother's work involved working with women who were severely damaged by bad obstetrical outcomes from the 1930s-50s. She had a lively practice.

Childbirth Without Fear was a book that was first published in 1942. Ferdinand LaMaze wrote his book in 1956. It was obvious for a very long time that something was wrong with the medical model of labor and delivery. Husbands were not regularly in the delivery room until 1976. And then the caesarean section rate took off. So much for progress.

Note how the nurse states that doctors practiced their surgical skills on women who really did not need the interventions.

That is why you hear women say, "S/He saved my baby!"

 

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The beginning of the twentieth century is the great development of medicine, but also the dark times of medicine. I wonder how many dark practices are still used
 
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