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Discussion Starter #1
The "couple-three" discussion on another thread got me thinking. What are some quirks of language people use in your area--the kind of quirks visitors may just not recognize?<br><br>
I live in Milwaukee, and we've got a few here:<br><br>
Bubbler=drinking fountain.<br>
Even though we're surrounded by "pop" land, soda=carbonated beverage here. Drive a few hours north, order a "soda," and you end up with a drink with ice cream in it.<br>
Rummage=garage, yard, or rummage *sale*. People just lop off the "sale" here.<br>
Bakery=both the place where one can purchase baked goods, and the baked goods themselves. "That latter definition seems specific to Milwaukee. "HUGE RUMMAGE Saturday. Will feature kids' clothes, household goods, misc. Also bakery available for sale, 50 cents each or 3 for a dollar."<br><br>
How about you?
 

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lol I am from WI, so when I came here to MN I noticed a big difference. I say, Bubbler, pop, I pronounce milk- MELK lol<br><br>
The weirdest thing was me looking for a Tyme Machine when I got here.. apparently they have ATMs here and not Tyme Machines.. so people looked at me like I was from Back to the Future when I asked "Wheres the nearest Tyme machine". lol<br><br>
My grandparents say Davenport for couch <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Well, I live in RI, so here we pahk ahr cahs in the yahd and have grindahs for lunch.<br><br>
Translation: we park our cars in the yard and have grinders (basically a sub sandwich) for lunch.<br><br>
You get the idear (idea).<br><br>
We also have bubblers (but we call them bubblas).<br><br>
Coke etc. is called soda unless you are one of those people that sticks an "r" in places where they weren't meant to go (such as the end of the word idea), then it would be a "soder".<br><br>
Some people's accents are mild and others are pretty heavy. I'm on the really mild end of the spectrum but I think that is because I lived in NJ until I was 9.
 

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Another one who grew up in WI here. Yeah, it was hard to remember not to slip up and say TYME machine when I meant ATM after we moved to CA, got a lot of weird looks for that one. Same thing with bubbler, my kids remind me it's a water fountain, not a bubbler. I grew up in Northeastern WI so everyone was "guy" or "you guys".<br><br>
Can't think of any unique CA sayings right now though.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>~Boudicca~</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15412363"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Well, I live in RI, so here we pahk ahr cahs in the yahd and have grindahs for lunch.<br><br>
Translation: we park our cars in the yard and have grinders (basically a sub sandwich) for lunch.<br><br>
You get the idear (idea).<br><br>
We also have bubblers (but we call them bubblas).<br><br>
Coke etc. is called soda unless you are one of those people that sticks an "r" in places where they weren't meant to go (such as the end of the word idea), then it would be a "soder".<br><br>
Some people's accents are mild and others are pretty heavy. I'm on the really mild end of the spectrum but I think that is because I lived in NJ until I was 9.</div>
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Ugh now I am going to have "Hoagies and grinders, hoagies and grinders, navy beans. navy beans" in my head all day lol
 

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A lot of my WI relatives that live farther up north totally speak 'Scansin lol<br><br>
Dem cars.. Da Packers are gonna crush Da Bears..<br><br>
They always start and end sentences with So..<br><br>
"So you should go down to get de beers and so..." "Ya stop at da tyme machine den head over".<br><br><br><br>
And HEY! Ohhh scanies love the Hey lol<br><br>
Schmear and pigshead lol good games<br><br>
My grandpa says Ainna a lot.. Good Game ainna Jen?<br><br>
Also the Piggle Wiggly is the Wobbely Sow or the pig!<br><br>
And everyone always says Highway A hundred.. instead of HWY 100 lol
 

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Discussion Starter #7
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mama2toomany</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15412353"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">lol I am from WI, so when I came here to MN I noticed a big difference. I say, Bubbler, pop, I pronounce milk- MELK lol</div>
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That's one Milwaukeeism I have *not* picked up. (I'm originally from the Chicago suburbs--which is "pop" land but I've always called it "soda," go figure"--but I've picked up most of the pronunciation.)<br><br>
Same with "aygs." I still pronounce those things hens lay "ehgs." "Allergy warning: Bakery may contain melk and aygs."<br><br>
Where I grew up, TYME machines were "Cash Stations," which I never picked up because by the time I was old enough to actually use one, I'd moved to Wisconsin. I don't think I picked up "TYME" because my then-boyfriend worked as an "ATM Software Support Specialist" and that just stuck.
 

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The only one I can think of for washington is saying baygs instead of bags.<br>
California has regional pecularities. Like if you're in LA you call I-5 "the 5" or I-10 is "the 10"<br>
I've lived in so many places. Hawaii has tons but it's almost like another language.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>~Boudicca~</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15412363"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Well, I live in RI, so here we pahk ahr cahs in the yahd and have grindahs for lunch.<br><br>
Translation: we park our cars in the yard and have grinders (basically a sub sandwich) for lunch.<br><br>
You get the idear (idea).<br><br>
We also have bubblers (but we call them bubblas).<br><br>
Coke etc. is called soda unless you are one of those people that sticks an "r" in places where they weren't meant to go (such as the end of the word idea), then it would be a "soder".<br><br>
Some people's accents are mild and others are pretty heavy. I'm on the really mild end of the spectrum but I think that is because I lived in NJ until I was 9.</div>
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This is why I'm not sure I want to move to RI with my son. I did have a RI accent until I was an older teen. Then I suddenly realized how awful it sounded and I worked very hard on speaking 'properly'.<br>
I don't want ds saying 'cah', 'pahk', idear, etc. Just thinking about it makes me shudder. Or should I say "shudda"?
 

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I didn't know I had any until i visited a heap of friends in Philadelphia a few years back (I'm from Edmonton, Alberta)<br><br>
I say P-ah- sta, not "paw-sta"<br><br><br>
I never thought I said "aboot" until I spent a significant amount of time in America. Apparently, I do. LOL<br><br>
Here, it's pop. I never hear ANY Canadians refer to it as "soda"<br><br>
Same with "subs"- never hoagie, hero, grinder, etc.
 

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Oh, and someone pointed out to me that I say "Phone me" and not "Call me". Apparently that's strange? hahaha
 

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Here in Oregon, you don't go to the beach, you "go to the coast".<br><br>
In the winter, you have "sunbreaks" (times when the clouds part briefly and the sun shines, before it clouds over and rains again).<br><br>
You don't have 'accidents' on the highway, you have 'wrecks'.<br><br>
You park in a 'parking structure' not a 'parking ramp' or 'parking garage' like where I grew up.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk"> this will be an interesting thread!<br><br>
My family moved from NJ to Maine when I was quite young and through school I remember purposely changing my speech patterns and pronunciations so I would fit in better <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> The most ridiculous thing I did was use double negatives because my classmates did <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
We go to the coast while my father, who is in NJ, visits the shore. Mainers are famous for adding R's to words that don't have them and taking them away from words that do. For example aunt is often aren't and car is cah . MIL says 'down cella' for something in the basement. 'Dooryard' is the front yard. Sdeboard is the kitchen counter.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LynnS6</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15412672"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You park in a 'parking structure' not a 'parking ramp' or 'parking garage' like where I grew up.</div>
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Heh...here, it's "parking ramp" almost exclusively. "Parking garage" in the Chicago area.<br><br>
"Subs." NEVER hoagie or grinder. My mom (Chicago born, been in the area all her life) would call them "Poor Boy sandwiches," which is decidedly different from a "po' boy" (as hers were basically the same cold cut sandwiches we'd have for lunch, only put on Italian bread and cut into slices--I think that was unique to her.) A few of my Chicago suburban cohorts would call them "Subways," even if they came from another restaurant/supermarket or were homemade.<br><br>
And, mama2toomany, "Highway Hunnert" or "Hundert" (without the "A" or "One") is Highway 100 here.
 

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Well!<br><br>
I live in Utah. There are some really interesting ones here.<br><br>
You never go to the "grocery", only the "store". A movie is a "show". You don't "cut" in line, you "butt" in line. You don't "cut class" you "sluff class". And "Oh my heck!" is supposed to be some sort of expletive.<br><br>
They tend to swallow syllables of certain words. For example, mountains = mou'ins. And any short e is pronounced as a short i, eg field = filled, feel = fill. Also sale = sell.<br><br>
Realtor = relator.<br>
Library = libary.<br>
Picture = pitcher.
 

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I'm from the upper Midwest. I'm sure there's more but right now I can think of two.<br>
1. We say "these ones". My boss likes to point out that the "ones" is unnecessary and a regional saying.<br>
2. We drop the g at the end of anything ending in -ing. So we are goin walkin, we need to do some talkin, I'm sayin, etc.
 

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I am born and raised in San Diego, so the only language quirk I can think of is using a lot of Spanish phrases in everyday speech. I never noticed it until we had family visiting from out of town.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mama2toomany</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15412353"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">lol I am from WI, so when I came here to MN I noticed a big difference. I say, Bubbler, pop, I pronounce milk- MELK lol<br><br>
The weirdest thing was me looking for a Tyme Machine when I got here.. apparently they have ATMs here and not Tyme Machines.. so people looked at me like I was from Back to the Future when I asked "Wheres the nearest Tyme machine". lol<br><br>
My grandparents say Davenport for couch <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I moved from Michigan to Wisconsin as an adult and the "Tyme Machine" thing definitely made me go <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/headscratch.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="headscratch"><br><br>
Another Wisconsin thing I noticed was people saying "go by" instead of "go to". For example, "We went by my mother-in-law's on Sunday night." I was picturing people just driving by these places instead of stopping in for a visit.
 

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I live in CO but I grew up <i>on</i> Long Island. We stood on line, not in line, drank soda not pop, and ate heros. People with thicker accents also say things like "I need to ax you a question" and yous guys. Then I went to college in Western Mass and ate grinders and round pizzas cut into squares <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.<br><br>
My grandparents are from NE Pennsylvania and also called the couch a devenport.
 
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