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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm really not stressing out about this too much, but every once in a while I wonder if I am being too laid back and missing something.<br><br>
DD#2 is 22 months and does not say a single word except for "Mama", which she uses to refer to me, her dad, and her older sister. She certainly communicates though! Her sister will say, "Look! A car like <i>our</i> car!" And DD2 will say, "Aa! A aaa aaa <i>aa</i> aaa!" Every word is "aaa" and she strings them together in sentences. She has no problem understanding us.<br><br>
It is extremely frustrating sometimes for both of us because sometimes I <i>don't</i> understand her and she cries and repeats the word "aaa" for however long it takes me to figure it out.<br><br>
I know she may just be developing at her own pace, or maybe holding back because her sister is such a chatterbox and she is afraid to make mistakes with such a pro around. I do get those moments, like now, when I second guess and wonder if I should get her checked.<br><br>
In any case, any thoughts or advice on how to handle, would you get her checked? Try to get her to start talking/or not even try and let her take her time?
 

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Does she sign at all? I've read that signs "count" as words.<br><br>
Have you ever seen the videos, "Signing Time"? I think it is a show (we don't watch TV, so I don't know when/where its on TV). But the videos are wonderful, engaging, and I learn so much & both my kids benefit from the additional ability to communicate. You might want to look into getting some from the library, or ebay if you don't want to invest too much in it.<br><br>
I don't have any experience with late talkers, so I can't advise from a BTDT point of view. But, if you're concerned, I don't think there's any harm in asking your child's Dr. about it.<br><br>
What did s/he say about her speech dev. at her last check-up?
 

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My mother said I didn't speak until my younger brother did (he's 1.5 years younger). Just lazy I guess? But I did have speech issues into my early childhood & in fact had to go to speech therapy sessions into grade 1 & 2. In the long run it didn't hold me back any or prove to be any problem, but it was an issue when I was young.<br><br>
My concern would be with the fact that she tries to communicate (ie. as her frustration that you don't get it shows) but doesn't seem to be able to do so effectively. I definitely would get a professional opinion - better to catch it now if it is an issue.
 

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My mom said I didn't talk till I was 3. Once I did I talked normally (except for mixing up my r's and w's). I wouldn't worry as long as she seems to understand you as that means she probably hears alright which would be my only concern. She just may be letting her sister do all her talking for her <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.
 

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A friend of mine has a LO who is 25 months... until a few months ago he was exactly as you describe. She decided to take him in to be evaluated. They said to keep an eye on it but there was nothing that they would do yet at this point. Now, three months later, he's chattering like any other kid his age. He had a slow start but caught up quickly!
 

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I can share our experience with our late talker. It is hard, because of course you don't want to push your child in any way. On the other hand, you don't want to hold them back if there is something out there that could be a help.<br><br>
On advice of our ped, we got in touch with a speech-language pathologist and had an evaluation at 2. The eval consisted of him playing with toys while she talked to him. He had no idea it was anything but going to play in a new place with a nice person (I was in the room, of course). She looked at his mouth, muscle tone, etc., to make sure there wasn't anything physical going on that was a problem. She also tested his receptive language skills, which in his case were great (sounds like that is the case with your dd as well). Because of this and his use of signs, she said there was no need to check back unless he wasn't using words at 2.5.<br><br>
At 2.5 he still didn't have spoken words, so we started therapy. The two of us go to our SLP's office for half an hour. I watch while she plays with ds and in the midst of that play gets him to use words. That's it! He <i>adores</i> her; when we get within sight of the building, he will actually clap and say, "yay"! At first we thought maybe it wasn't going to do much good, but it's been clear that the play/work time is really making a difference. As the months have gone on, she will ask more of him, and I can see him dealing with and then rising to the challenge. It's cool.<br><br>
So, I guess what I'm trying to say is that your dd probably is going to be fine and will start talking sometime very soon - but if you do get her checked out and they find that speech therapy would be helpful, don't feel like it's going to be this terrible clinical thing, or that it's going to be labeling your daughter. For us it's been a very positive experience.
 

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i have a niece who was a late talker. she. too, was only saying "mama" and "no" until about 2.5. and then her language exploded. she didnt start saying more words; she went straight to full sentences. i watched her at my house when she was just grunting and kindof babbling, and then saw her less than a month later and asked her about her tshirt and was amazed when she said "those are all my friends in my class."<br>
same with another cousin as well. this little girl is a couple months older than my ds and her parents were very concerned that she wasnt talking. there was a really huge difference between the many words and phrases my ds was using and the nearly no words she had. but again, she suddenly began talking in sentences shortly before she turned 3. now this little girl is particularly articulate and talks mostly nonstop <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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DS was a very late talker. Had only about 10-20 words by 24 months. He understood us. When he was facing us. Turns out he had hearing issues. If you can't hear sounds well, you don't learn how to use sounds. Then DD came along and is 22 months now and speaking in full, long, complete sentences. Of course there is a huge range between kids, and even siblings. But for me, DS hearing was so obvious in retrospect, but not at the time. I would ask for a hearing test. Better to have one and it be fine than to wait if your DC could benefit from intervention.
 

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I worry about this at times.. DD is 20 months and really doesn't talk much. She will go days without saying more than Mommy and Daddy.. However, everyone in my family are late talkers. My mother didn't start talking until almost 4 1/2 (she was able to read before she could talk, my grandma told me since when my mom started to talk she would read books to my grandma). I was considered an early talker in my family and I said my first word at 18 months..<br>
Im trying not to worry until at least 2.. DD has awesome understanding of what we are saying. She can follow directions well and understands what we are saying. She gets her point accross very well and if we don't understand she will just start to do it herself until we get what she wants(she got the water jug out of the fridge today and tried to pour herself a cup of water).
 

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I think you should have a Speech/Language evaluation from your local birth-three yrs. program (Early Intervention).<br><br>
It sounds like your little one has a limited sound repertoire and is getting frustrated. Definitely try some signing or picture communication to enhance your communication. Always say the word when you sign or show a picture.<br><br>
Yes, kids develop at their own pace, but if we can facilitate that learning and help ease some of the frustration, shouldn't we?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ochoco</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12374673"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I can share our experience with our late talker. It is hard, because of course you don't want to push your child in any way. On the other hand, you don't want to hold them back if there is something out there that could be a help.<br><br>
On advice of our ped, we got in touch with a speech-language pathologist and had an evaluation at 2. The eval consisted of him playing with toys while she talked to him. He had no idea it was anything but going to play in a new place with a nice person (I was in the room, of course). She looked at his mouth, muscle tone, etc., to make sure there wasn't anything physical going on that was a problem. She also tested his receptive language skills, which in his case were great (sounds like that is the case with your dd as well). Because of this and his use of signs, she said there was no need to check back unless he wasn't using words at 2.5.<br><br>
At 2.5 he still didn't have spoken words, so we started therapy. The two of us go to our SLP's office for half an hour. I watch while she plays with ds and in the midst of that play gets him to use words. That's it! He <i>adores</i> her; when we get within sight of the building, he will actually clap and say, "yay"! At first we thought maybe it wasn't going to do much good, but it's been clear that the play/work time is really making a difference. As the months have gone on, she will ask more of him, and I can see him dealing with and then rising to the challenge. It's cool.<br><br>
So, I guess what I'm trying to say is that your dd probably is going to be fine and will start talking sometime very soon - but if you do get her checked out and they find that speech therapy would be helpful, don't feel like it's going to be this terrible clinical thing, or that it's going to be labeling your daughter. For us it's been a very positive experience.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I think this is extremely good advice. An evaluation can't hurt and is something I'd probably do around age 2. It's not about getting a diagnosis, it's about helping your child to communicate if possible and lessen frustration.
 

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I agree with getting an eval. EI can be great and your DD is at just the right age for it. It can't hurt, and it may set your mind at ease also.
 

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Well, my son will be two next month and he is *trying* much harder to communicate, but it's still all 'dee-dee!!!!' DEEEEEE!<br><br>
It's worst in the evening when he's frustrated after trying to talk all day and we still don't get it. We say 'show me' and try to understand that way.<br><br>
I'm assuming this too shall pass and his language will take off at some point... he hears and sees well, so we are okay there.
 

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I could have written your post, and I have actually posted similar posts. DD had maybe 10 words at 23 months and they were only spoken when we asked her to say it...i.e. "Say dirt, Kylie, Say cat, Kylie". She said "DaDa" on her own and "THAT" for everything. LIke your LO, she understood EVERYTHING we said to her and followed complex directions. DD also used several signs - but it wasn't helping her frustration level.<br>
We ended up having her screened by early intervention and she was on track and ahead for her age in every area except expressive language. She was in the 9-12 month range. She qualified for services and after only three sessions she has begun talking so much more. After the first session- a few days later I was taking her to my mom;s in the morning before work and she pointed at both trucks and busses and said, "truck and bus" each time we passed one. Now she is saying "ouch" when she gets hurt, and calling our dog by her name "lillie, " and so much more. She is just identifying so much by name by herself without any prompting, and she gets sooo excited because she can finally communicate with us and we can finally understand her. She has picked up so many more signs as well which has suprisingly helped her verbal language.<br><br>
Early intervention is a WONDERFUL thing - LO's are sooo much more intelligent than we give them credit for that it only takes a short while for them to "get" what the therapist is trying to do, and talking happends FAST.<br><br>
PM me if you have any questions<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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My DS was evaluated right around two and a half (can't remember exactly!) because he had so few words, and his pronounciation was soo far off. I was surprised when they told me he was actually only a little bit behind. They gave me some tips for working with him at home and basically said to call them back in six months if he hadn't gotten any better.<br><br>
Well, he just turned 3, and now he speaks in full sentences and you can understand 95% of what he says. I swear it happened overnight!<br><br>
So, I don't think you should be worried, she's most likely just fine, but I think you should get an evaluation just to be on the safe side.
 

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My dd is the same age as yours and we are going through almost the same thing. My gut was saying I should have her evaluated, and our ped (who I love) agreed. She had her evaluation with the speech pathologist last week, and she agreed that she is behind in expressive language and recommended once a week sessions. I have seen it work wonders on little ones around 2, and I am hoping it goes the same for us. I am of the earlier the better camp since I have seen some that didn't start until much later and then it was a big struggle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hey thanks everyone. I guess I won't stress out but will still ask her pediatrician about early intervention. It is good to hear you describe it, ochoco, that it won't be frightening for her.
 

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you can self refer to EI, no need to wait for pedi. DS has been in speech therapy since he was 2, he enjoys people coming over to play with him. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 
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