Mothering Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,103 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<p>My 9mo DS has somewhat of a lazy eye in his left eye.  I notice it when he's sort of in a daze, when he's eating, but when he gets excited, happy, laughing, etc., it's just as full as the other eye.  Any cause for concern?  He just had a check up and the NP didn't mention anything to DH about it.  Will it go away?  Sorry, if that sounded like a stupid question, but I'm 100% clueless.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,549 Posts
<p>Please follow up specifically with an eye doctor about this. A lazy eye CAN be corrected - if it's caught early. Dh's parents did not get him checked & it wasn't caught. There is nothing as an adult he can do to correct it.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Generally the corrections is a schedule of wearing an eye patch over the strong eye to force the lazy one to catch up.</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,488 Posts
<p>I'd see a pediatric ophthalmologist, for any eye issues our pedi refers to an ophthalmologist--so if you have a pediatrician, they should have a list of names to choose from.  As the PP said--some vision issues need to be identified and corrected early, otherwise vision will be permanently impaired.  And they'd be the most qualified to say whether, in your particular case, there's something that needs to be addressed now. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,214 Posts
<p>Someone asked me when DD was about 6 or 7 months old if she had a lazy eye. I hadn't noticed! DP and I took her to the GP (who hadn't noticed either but wanted to check it out just in case) and were referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist. I was also told that if caught early it is totally treatable.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>For us, the test was really simple and it turned out she didn't have a lazy eye at all...she has really large eyes and is broad across the bridge of her nose and the doc said it was likely just an optical illusion.</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,561 Posts
<p>I had a lazy eye when I was a kid! And now it is fine. I am very grateful that my parents took action when I was young so that it was treated properly.They took me to an eye doctor and this was my treatment- I wore glasses from about age 5-age 12, bifocals. But the main treatment was that for about a year (when I was five) or maybe less, I wore a patch (which I could take off and on- it was just a patch with elastic that went aorund my head) on the "good" eye- so the other one was forced to stregthen. this was good treatment. I don't have any traumatic associations or anything as I was so young when I did it. And it really made a difference. So based on my own experience I would recommend treatment of this type and an evaluation with a good eye doctor- I know I had my treatment around kindergarder and I am not sure when my parents first brought me to the eye doctor- someime in nursery school age I suppose.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,580 Posts
<p>If you're concerned, get it checked out.  I actually have amblyopia (lazy eye) and have worn glasses since I was 18mo.  Because it's genetic I've had both of my kids in to see a dr starting before they were 1.  My current dr said that they can tell if there is an issue in infancy, it's always better safe than to miss something.  (I ended up walking late, probably because I couldn't see well).</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
<p>We just saw a ped opthalmologist on Wednesday for the same issue. I would get it checked out to be on the safe side. The tests were mostly noninvasive, a lot of the Dr. waving toys in front of DD's face to get her attention. She did have to get her pupils dilated, and cried for a sec when he sprayed the drops, but other than that it was pretty painless. Except, of course, trying to hold her head still while the doc looked in her eyes . . . . as he put it, "Like trying to hold an octopus still!". </p>
<p> </p>
<p>In our case, it ended up being an 'optical illusion' as well, and not a true lazy eye. We go for a follow up in a few months to be on the safe side. I'm glad we did it though, I can relax now.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,103 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>aphel</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1284804/lazy-eye-should-i-be-concerned#post_16108871"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>We just saw a ped opthalmologist on Wednesday for the same issue. I would get it checked out to be on the safe side. The tests were mostly noninvasive, a lot of the Dr. waving toys in front of DD's face to get her attention. She did have to get her pupils dilated, and cried for a sec when he sprayed the drops, but other than that it was pretty painless. Except, of course, trying to hold her head still while the doc looked in her eyes . . . . as he put it, "Like trying to hold an octopus still!". </p>
<p> </p>
<p>In our case, it ended up being an 'optical illusion' as well, and not a true lazy eye. We go for a follow up in a few months to be on the safe side. I'm glad we did it though, I can relax now.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p><br><br>
I will be calling our ped's office today.  Thanks, mamas!!</p>
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top