Mothering Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>For a 5 year old not yet in kindergarten but bright?? For those that have both what do you and or your child get the most use out of and the most learning from: Leapster OR Tag Reading system? I am looking for education value -not just entertainment. As a former teacher and one who limits TV, I'm not so sure about Leapster although kidwise, Leapster is probably more appealing, right? Toys R Us has a sale tomorrow for Leapster 2 for $35. We have some books on tape that he is not interested in AT ALL-so Tag makes me skeptical but as a teacher I <em>think</em> I like Tag better. Thoughts from experience?</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,388 Posts
We have Leapsters. My daughter is six, in first grade, and a fluent reader-- and loves her Leapster 2. My three year old twins love theirs, too. So there's a wide age range that these appeal to.<br><br>
I haven't seen the Tag thing you're talking about. Is that one of the things that you point at the words, and it reads them? We had something like that, and y DD1 hated it. It wouldn't read ALL our books, and that drove her nuts, plus she got bored with it quickly. The experience of being read to is about more than the words-- she was always wanting ME to read the books. She's had the Leapster 2 for more than two years, though, and still plays with it frequently.<br><br>
I was against them to begin with-- I don't allow much media exposure, and video games kind of worried me. So we set some limits on their use, and it's worked nicely for us.<br><br>
As far as educational value-- I don't know. The games do introduce stuff like colors, numbers, letters, word-reading, etc. But if that were my main objective, I wouldn't count on a Leapster to do it. For us, they're pure fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
<p>I dont think either one is actually educational, they are just for entertainment.  </p>
<p> </p>
<p>The tag type systems read each word one at a time or the whole paragraph, but it sounds very 'unatural' with the flow of speech.   We had one for a few days (I got it at a thrift store), and I re-donated it because of how weird it sounded.   </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I think you can play with it at Toys R Us and see what I mean...  </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p>The leapster, almost all of the games are TV character related, and most seem to be more about the character doing stuff vs. actual learning material (I've only played with one for a short time while babysitting a 4 yr old, she got bored of each game quickly and kept changing it out).   If you dont do much TV, the 'character' thing might not appeal as much. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
796 Posts
<p>I'm wondering why you would want a video game for a five year old. My six year old has never played a video game and I'm just fine with that. I don't feel that any video games are educational and the other poster is correct, pretty much all of them are based on tv. Why not skip the video game and let them play on starfall.com?</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
<p>My 5 yr old does use the starfall website for letters and reading and enjoys his time w/them. We did get a Leapster for long car rides and we only purchase learning games. He still confuses for instance b and d so we get alphabet games; he's learning addition so we've gotten him early math games. I don't worry if Diego happens to be the character he's reading along with b/c I've got his attention and he's excited to learn. Win, Win. That may not work for everyone and I've never used the Tag system. Our public school utilizes technology quite a bit so he already felt comfortable w/it when he entered this year.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,058 Posts
<p>I'm a former teacher, too and up until now have been pretty anti-educational technology.  I did order my six-year-old kindergartner a Leapster Explorer for Christmas along with a few games.  I prefer the Explorer to the Leapster 2.  I strongly dislike the TAG for the reasons described above.  It's not reading.  The flow isn't there and I would find it frustrating. </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,606 Posts
<p><br><br>
I have to disagree....They are for entertainment, yes....but they are very educational....I speak specifically of the Leapster 2 as ds has this and not the tag.  He has about 20 games now for it and every game has an underlying subject or two that it focuses on.  Be it from learning shapes and colours, learning to print and sound out words, outright reading skills and basic addition and subtraction.  DS loves it and I would recommend it to any looking for an addition to their learning/teaching library.  I homeschool ds and at 4 he is reading level 2 readers and adding and subtracting multiple numbers (I have 100objects...mommy can have 3 and daddy can have 3 and I will have 4).  I attribute much of his learned skills and his love of learning to his leapster time (not all of course but a decent amount).  There are many non character games -digging for dinosaurs, Letters on the Loose, Learning with Leap, Creature Creator, Get Puzzeled, LEarn to Draw and Write, I Spy, Outwit, Math Missions, Numbers on the Run as well as a few others. </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>leighi123</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1284599/leapster-2-and-kindergarten-software-or-tag-reader-and-short-vowel-books#post_16108038"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p><strong>I dont think either one is actually educational, they are just for entertainment.  </strong></p>
<p>  </p>
<p> </p>
<p>The leapster, almost all of the games are TV character related, and most seem to be more about the character doing stuff vs. actual learning material (I've only played with one for a short time while babysitting a 4 yr old, she got bored of each game quickly and kept changing it out).   If you dont do much TV, the 'character' thing might not appeal as much. </p>
</div>
</div>
<br><br>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,606 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>elus0814</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1284599/leapster-2-and-kindergarten-software-or-tag-reader-and-short-vowel-books#post_16108103"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I'm wondering why you would want a video game for a five year old. My six year old has never played a video game and I'm just fine with that. I don't feel that any video games are educational and the other poster is correct, pretty much all of them are based on tv. Why not skip the video game and let them play on starfall.com?</p>
</div>
</div>
<br><br><p> </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
<p>We have both for my 5 year olds. They love them both (all though they are fluent readers). They are both educational.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>TAG:</p>
<p> </p>
<p>We like the phonetic activities at the back of the books, My girls read the books and then use the TAG reader for unfamiliar words. It is GREAT for expanding vocabulary. So far they come out for car trips, Dr visits, and quiet activity. We plan on getting the interactive map for Xmas. I do have to admit, I do not like the 'easy readers' , the stories are flat and uninspiring. We love the I SPY book, and classics like "The little Engine that could". If you do not want Characters, there are some non-character books (Giraffes Dont Dance, Chicka Chicka Boom Boom). Mine also enjoy the National Geographic flip cards about animals.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Leapster: We think this is educational. Yes, it is techonological--but it also is helpful and more than entertainment. Most of the games ARE based on characters (we are low TV watchers, my kids know the characters- but do not watch the TV shows), but still have academic qualities. We use them again- for car rides & Dr appointments. I think it has helped reinforce academic skills and it adapts to the childs level. We limit the use of this, but it is enjoyed a lot when it is used.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p>My kids do not play either excessively, but they have been used enough that I feel they both were  good investment.  The TAG helped them be better readers (I am a teacher and feel that the repeated readings and 'vocabulary' element was well worth it) and the Leapster introduced new concepts and basic skills.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> </p>
<p>$ wise the TAG is cheaper for a few books and the system. The Leapster is pricerier--but looks like it has a longer 'use' life. So far we have had both for 2+ years and the TAG will be outgrown in a year or two, I see the Leapster being around even longer.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>We use Starfall.com as well....but the portability factor is just not there. I LOVE that we take long car trips (no TV in car or CD player) and the TAG/Leapster are invaluable. They are also helpful when I need to speak to a DR and have them focused on something else for a few moments.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
<p>Have you seen the V Reader yet? It's like a Kindle for kids. I've been considering it but the price tag put me off.</p>
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top