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At what age or what point would it be logical to test a child for learning disabilities? We are beginning to wonder about our 4-year-old. She is in her 2nd year of Montessori. The fact that I have one and at least 2 other extended family members have them makes me more aware of the possibility. The fact she is having trouble at school makes me wonder if it's more than just an age/maturity thing. Might be too early to tell - I don't know. Vision and hearing have been tested in the last 6 months and were fine.
 

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Originally Posted by Koloe View Post
At what age or what point would it be logical to test a child for learning disabilities? We are beginning to wonder about our 4-year-old. She is in her 2nd year of Montessori. The fact that I have one and at least 2 other extended family members have them makes me more aware of the possibility. The fact she is having trouble at school makes me wonder if it's more than just an age/maturity thing. Might be too early to tell - I don't know. Vision and hearing have been tested in the last 6 months and were fine.
What exactly are you noticing? It depends on what you are thinking of. If you don't want to discuss it in an open forum, feel free to drop me a line.

Generally speaking, if it's something where they are not learning at a regular pace or having trouble staying focused, they might not do a lot at this age. Usually, you're looking at least around the age 6 for that. If it's something more along the lines of ASD or a few other things you notice, they can do an earlier diagnosis.

Matt
 

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Originally Posted by MattBronsil View Post
What exactly are you noticing? It depends on what you are thinking of. If you don't want to discuss it in an open forum, feel free to drop me a line.

Generally speaking, if it's something where they are not learning at a regular pace or having trouble staying focused, they might not do a lot at this age. Usually, you're looking at least around the age 6 for that. If it's something more along the lines of ASD or a few other things you notice, they can do an earlier diagnosis.

Matt
Some of those things I'm seeing, but she can concentrate on a work when SHE wants too. There are definitely maturity issues with staying focused. But there are other things, mostly just little things at the moment. She really isn't interested in being given presentations from her teacher. Peaceful child she is not.


My mother tells me that the Special Ed teacher told her eons ago that I was unable to learn to read phonetically. So if my child should end up having the same problem, (though I'm hoping she doesn't) how would that impact her learning to read in a Montessori room that is based on teaching letters & reading phonetically? I doubt it would matter if she was in Montessori or a traditional classroom, as I think that's how they teach all the kids in the district.
 

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I think 4 years old is a reasonable age to check things out more - a little early to get some definitive answers, but good to be aware of things. On some things, we were able to get definitive answers that early. We noticed a few things my son was struggling with (he was in a play based preschool when he was 3 and 4 years old). He had an Occupational Evaluation at 4.5 years old, and confirmed some of what I suspected. Some of the other things I was concerned about, we were told that it was too early to tell if they were issues yet or not - that most kids his age were able to do those things, but not all and so in order to see if he was at the very slow end of the average range, we gave him more time to develop some things.

He started OT shortly after the evaluation and moved to a Montessori school this year, both of which have helped him tremendously. DS also saw a psychologist (who said that at 4 years old, he was too young to make a diagnosis for ADD or ADHD). We also considered seeing a developmental pediatrician.

I actually wish I had followed my gut and pursued some of this stuff earlier than I did. I have also found his Montessori teachers much more aware of, and able to address, the areas he struggles with than the teachers at his other school.
 
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