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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So here's my story. I've been a graduate student in clinical psych. for the past 6 years. I finished up my classes while pregnant, and have been at home with my dd this past year, while also working on my dissertation. In 2 and a little bit months I'm going on my internaship (last degree requirement). My little one (12 months currently) will be at home with my dh and/or his family (we're moving in with my in-laws). So I know my little one will be in a safe and loving environemnt, with people who care about her.

But I'd love some advice/ reassurace on how to manage my own transition from other working mamas out there.

1)We're still breastfeeding, but it seems mostly for dd comfort and to help settle her at night. I'm still torn on whether to wean or try to pump. Work is sooooooooooo not conducive to pumping. There is one bathroom in the whole building, and I'm sharing a tiny office with two other people. I'm not sure whether breastfeeding just in the evenings and during the night will keep any supply up at all. Any advice/ stories about being able to day wean and breastfeed at night (my preferred option).

2)What are things I can do to help with my separation anxiety since sharing lunches are out (I'm working 50 miles from where I'll be living)? I'll be gone ten hours a day and that's an awfully dramatic change from being home all the time.

3) I'd love to hear stories about how other people sucessfully! managed the transition back to work, and what they did that helped them and their little ones.
 

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I have to work now bc i am seperated
The transition was hard bc i went from very part time to more full time . the hardest part is not being able to get togrther with friends and their kids except on a limited basis.

When DD was a nursling, she made up for it all night. I was only very pt then.

It will be all right , sorry i don't have more to say. It sucks to have to leave the goslings. i won't lie.
 

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I can only really respond on point 1. Is your dd taking other liquids besides breastmilk? Cow's/soy milk from a cup or sippy? Water?

If so, then I really wouldn't worry about that. Bring a hand pump for the first few weeks because you may want to relieve some pressure at times. Starting at 13 months, we went to a "nurse when mom's home" routine. It worked fine. There was no need to day wean on the weekend, for instance. If I was there, we'd nurse, if not, it was water in a sippy cup. My supply reacted just fine, though after a stressful weekend (lots of nursing) I would occasionally relieve some pressure on Mondays.

My daughter is nearly 3 and we're still nursing.

If your daughter won't take any liquids besides breastmilk (either allergy or preference) then you will likely have to pump. Be somewhat insistant but polite with your supervisor. You will need some space with a solid locking door -- no windows to the hallway -- and an electrical outlet. Some women, though, find that their car is the most comfortable place to pump. You can get an adaptor for the cigarette lighter.
 

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MY EXPERIENCE TOO WITH LEAVING THOSE LITTLE ONES IS ..DITTO... IF ALLOWED, SHE/HE WILL MAKE UP TIME WITH YOU BY NURSING more at night. All 4 of mine did that. It made me tired, but was reassuring to know that they had a system to get their needs met !
 

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answers to your questions
(1) ditto Geofizz although dd is weaned now at 2.5. Her daughter karen seems way more attached to nursing than my erin is/was. Probably because Geo had more milk (I constantly struggled with supply issues).

(2). separation issues: do you have email access and a digital camera? can your family email a daily picture of what your dc is up to so you can take a peak at lunch? Also I'd figure out some specific kind of thing to do each weekend that's special mom time. Given your long work hours I'd expect to be very tired in the evenings. For a while I read a story to my dd every day before I left for work. It took like 5 minutes (i selected the story) but it provided a nice routine for saying goodbye.
 

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I day weaned when my dd was about 13 months. It worked great - we nurse before I leave (we cosleep so she's still asleep and I just nurse her before I get out of bed - actually makes for a nice way to transition after the alarm goes off) and as soon as I get home. We've been doing this for a year now, and my supply adjusted well.

I also work long hours (10-12 hour days are the norm), and make up for it by spending every moment I'm home with dd. She is also on a late to bed, late to rise schedule, so even if I don't get home til 7 I get to see her for 3 hours before we both go to bed at 10ish.

It is hard, but if you stay busy during the day, it isn't as bad as you might fear. The worst days are when I have time to think about it, which isn't very often. Good luck!
 

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I day weaned at a year- I was tired from having to pump at work. Plus the surroundings were less than ideal. DS nurses in the evenings and at night just fine an also on weekends.

For the second point my DH is overseas for a number of months. We use the digital camera and the webcam to keep in touch. If you and your in-laws (or just your in-laws) have a web-cam then you can arrange to contact them and see what she is up to. It might be easier to leave her.

Best of luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I wanted to thank you for your advice. Dd is taking water from a sippy cup. She doesn't like anything else to drink, however, except the occasional OJ she shares with my dh. I'm glad to hear that nursing when available works for other people.
 
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