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Hi!<br><br>
I had a wonderful birth experience almost 3 yrs ago...natural, unmed, labored mostly at home (2 hrs at hospital), amazing midwife. She said my body birthed beautifully. If I knew then what I know now, I would have had a HB. My one regret is letting them give DD the vit K shot which I suspect caused her jaundice, heelsticks, phototherapy... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/mecry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="crying"><br><br>
Anyway, if I ever get pg again, I would want to do a HB. I had this thought: if something went "wrong" and the baby was severly harmed, (or died), etc., how likely is it that someone (like Social Services) would come into the picture and try to prove abuse/neglect, saying that "this would have never happened if you were in a hospital"?<br><br>
*I* know that HBs are safer; I'm just wondering what the legal ramifications are if something goes awry.
 

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Home birth is legal in all 50 states. In some states, midwives are illegal, but it's illegal to BE one, not to HAVE one. And of course, if nothing goes wrong, no one will come down on you. UC is legal in all states.<br><br>
If you are single, low-income, a teenager or over 40, in the middle of a child custody battle or nasty divorce, have a mental illness or a criminal record, are a drug abuser, or have any known pregnancy complications or medical issues, you may be harrassed for having a home birth even if nothing does go wrong. If something goes wrong and you fit into the above situations, things could be bad.<br><br>
But, if you can say no to most of the above situations and nothing goes wrong with your birth, probably nothing bad will happen.<br><br>
If something goes wrong with your birth when you and your care provider had no reason to believe it would, you may be off the hook for any legal issues. Sadly, this is often not true for the midwife.<br><br>
It's not fair, considering that obstetricians lose far more babies and mothers than midwives do, yet it's almost never seen as their fault.<br><br>
You probably have nothing to worry about - just check with your local midwives about what kinds of births they can and can't attend.
 

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My personal expereince with Social Services is that they stick their nose in wherever they want.<br><br>
Just be careful who you talk to about your planned home birth and good luck.
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><i>Originally posted by Greaseball</i><br><b>Home birth is legal in all 50 states. In some states, midwives are illegal, but it's illegal to BE one, not to HAVE one. And of course, if nothing goes wrong, no one will come down on you. UC is legal in all states.<br></b></td>
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Isn't it that direct-entry midwives are illegal in some states (like mine, IL), but CNMs are legal? Are there states where you can't even have CNMs?
 

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Ragana, CNM's may be "legal" (<i>legally recognized</i> or <i>legally "allowed" to practice</i> would probably be a better term) in some states, but they almost always work under the direction of OB's (which generally makes them no better than most doctors, and worse in some cases). It is my understanding that in my state, only direct entry midwives can legally attend homebirths.<br><br>
I totallly 100% agree with everything Greaseball had to say about it!
 
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