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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend of mine is in the hospital right now with her 1.5 yr old daughter who might have leukemia. I was doing dome reading on it and found that some think that leukemia can develop due to exposure to radiation before birth and after birht.<br><br>
here's my quesiton: this little girls grandmother has cancer, and goes for radiation treatments once a monht. after her treatments she comes and watches the kids (i'm talking like 15 - 20 min after treatments.) could the radiation that she's be getting have seeped (if tha'ts the word I'm looking for) to this child? I'm not familiar with radiation just curious.<br><br>
also I know when her mom was pregnant with her, her brother was undergoing tons of x-rays and surgeries dur to a crainial deisorder. I'm just curious.
 

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I don't know the answer to your question. And it is so sad for this child. I would ask whether the child had the Vita K shot a birth because I have read that there might be a connection to that and childhood leukemia.
 

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I don't know the answer to your question. I can however ask my friend whose spouse is a pediatric oncologist.
 

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I think it depends on the treatment. I do know of several people who were told not to be around pregnant women or infants for a certain amount of time (ranging from a few days to six weeks) after treatment because they could "leak," for lack of a better term. But I couldn't tell you specifically what kind of radiation treatment they received.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>earthmama369</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9847359"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think it depends on the treatment. I do know of several people who were told not to be around pregnant women or infants for a certain amount of time (ranging from a few days to six weeks) after treatment because they could "leak," for lack of a better term. But I couldn't tell you specifically what kind of radiation treatment they received.</div>
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This is very scary! I used to take my mil for her radiation treatments once a week several years ago when dd12 was only 2! DD would go with us <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> ughhh very scary stuff.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes this is since I never knew till yesterday that they could leak. I was always around my grandfathe when i was 15 after all his radiation and chemo treatments
 

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Scary.. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I had to have CT scan because of appendicitis earlier this year and I was nursing.. AND my ds had to have a CT scan at 6 weeks old because of an accident. Now I really feel bad! Any update on your friend?
 

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Here is my understanding of this. There are two types of radiation therapy: external (which is like having an x-ray, where a machine outside your body provides the radiation and it is directed at the tumor) and internal, where radioactive materials are injected into or otherwise placed near the tumor.<br><br>
The first kind poses no risk of "leaks" (and that applies to CT scans** too!), the second kind does. The external kind, once the source of radiation is gone (the machine), the radiation is gone -- it only affects tissues while it's actually operating. With the internal kind, obviously the radioactive material takes a while to break down/be eliminated.<br><br>
**ETA I guess it's more accurate to say CT scans fit into the "external" category UNLESS a radioactive contrast dye is used.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mavery</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9862822"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Here is my understanding of this. There are two types of radiation therapy: external (which is like having an x-ray, where a machine outside your body provides the radiation and it is directed at the tumor) and internal, where radioactive materials are injected into or otherwise placed near the tumor.<br><br>
The first kind poses no risk of "leaks" (and that applies to CT scans** too!), the second kind does. The external kind, once the source of radiation is gone (the machine), the radiation is gone -- it only affects tissues while it's actually operating. With the internal kind, obviously the radioactive material takes a while to break down/be eliminated.<br><br>
**ETA I guess it's more accurate to say CT scans fit into the "external" category UNLESS a radioactive contrast dye is used.</div>
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My friend's spouse, the oncologist, said something similiar. She likened the first type of radiation to a flash in a camera. The flash goes off "poof" and it's gone. It doesn't linger. Once it's done it's done.
 
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