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<p>I need to wow my dh with tofu. please share a recipe that will impress him.</p>
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<p>thank you kindly,</p>
<p>christine</p>
 

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<p><a href="http://veganmenu.blogspot.com/2010/10/apple-smoked-tofu-stuffed-with-collard.html" target="_blank">http://veganmenu.blogspot.com/2010/10/apple-smoked-tofu-stuffed-with-collard.html</a></p>
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<p>something i was just looking at.</p>
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<p>are you looking for a hidden tofu dish? i.e tofu pretending to be something else? or a straight-up tofu dish?</p>
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<p>difficulty level? fancy-schmancy? or just something to convince him to like tofu?</p>
 

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<p>i am looking for anything that will really wow him for a very fulfilling main meal. i have decrease our meals with meat and always substitute with beans or soup recipes with beans, so I am looking to expand into tofu dishes. he typically likes italian / mediterranean dishes, but it does not have to be exclusive to those. thanks a bunch</p>
 

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<p><a href="http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=10693.0" target="_blank">http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=10693.0</a></p>
<p>Add mushrooms for depth of meaty flavor, like crimini, oyster, small strips of portabella, etc.</p>
<p>Serve with brown rice and let the tofu marinade for 2 days in the fridge, add a bit of corn starch. </p>
<p>Use extra firm and cut into small chunks after marinading.  </p>
<p>I add "oyster" sauce, you can find really good brands that are veggie.  </p>
<p>Also sprinkle green onion thinly sliced on top. </p>
<p>HTH</p>
 

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<p>This is a tough one.  I've never "wow"d a meat-eater with a tofu recipe unless it was hidden like in a tofu-pumpkin pie recipe.</p>
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<p>But, I must say the stuffed apple tofu pictures has impressed me!  I haven't tried it, but looks good!</p>
 

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<p>The way I got DH to like tofu (he had only eaten it once at a Chinese place and found it disgusting) was by putting it in a coconut curry with veggies. Very simple and tasty.</p>
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<p>-can of coconut milk</p>
<p>-veggies of your choice (I often use some kind of green, carrots, onions, peas, peppers... whatever as long as it's not too watery like tomatoes)</p>
<p>-FIRM tofu, cubed (I have spoken with many non-tofu eaters who were squicked out by the texture of silken tofu)</p>
<p>-some Thai or Indian curry paste</p>
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<p>Cook the veggies and tofu in the coconut milk with a couple tablespoons of curry paste mixed in until veggies are done. Serve with rice.</p>
 

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<p>I call tofu and beans good protein or protein packed.  For instance I say we are going to have a stir fry, if asked I say with veg and lots of good protein.  Plus I did research the protein levels in the various foods extensively so I am able to compare and contrast honestly if asked.  </p>
 

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Discussion Starter #8
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Sol_y_Paz</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1279279/looking-for-a-knock-your-socks-off-tofu-recipe#post_16046850"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a>Plus I did research the protein levels in the various foods extensively so I am able to compare and contrast honestly if asked.  </div>
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<p>This is something I need to work on.</p>
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<p>Thanks for the recipes, I'll ask my dh which one appeals more to him.</p>
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<p>I also have the silken tofu to make coconut custard for my son and then I am going to try a tofu pumpkin pie. My son is on a high calorie, high protein diet, which is the main reason I am trying to bring tofu in to our diet. My dh will be the hardest to impress with tofu, thanks again for a good starting point.<br>
 </p>
 

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<p>I personally find that tofu works best in Asian dishes, i.e. the cuisines in which it is a natural component. I just cannot fathom eating tofu "Italian-style" - it just does not work for me, personally. Some tried and true, very flavorable recipes that I do with tofu include:</p>
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<p>Chinese: Tofu and mixed veggies (or just spring onion) in a variety of sauces: black bean sauce, ginger and garlic sauce, sweet and sour sauce, whatever you really like. I also sometimes just pan fry it with some ginger and garlic. You can also make a fried rice with firm tofu pan fried and mixed in with whatever other veggie additions you like.</p>
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<p>Thai: a curry, like the one mentioned by ususarctos, or another stir-fry with veggies, using whatever Thai sauce suits my fancy on a given night.</p>
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<p>Indian: I use firm tofu cubes in place of paneer in a variety of dishes.</p>
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<p>Like another PP said, you may want to go with a firmer variety and pan-fry it, which may make it feel more substantial and reduce texture issues.</p>
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<p>Would he go for a tofu scramble?  <a href="http://www.vegetariantimes.com/recipes/11165?section=" target="_blank">http://www.vegetariantimes.com/recipes/11165?section=</a></p>
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<p>It's a little less "exotic" if your DH is finicky...but it's still yummy!</p>
 

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<p>I am veg and live with a meat-eater who is open to tofu but a bit more discriminating about flavors/textures than I am. We have found that finding a brand you like and properly draining the tofu is just as important as finding a good recipe. I think we tried 5-6 brands before a clear winner was determined! The tofu should be drained before you marinate it, use it in a stir-fry, or any other recipe where draining is recommended. We wrap the tofu in towels, place on a plate, place another plate on top and then stack several heavy cans on top of all that. Give it at least 30 minutes. This opens up all kinds of spongy pockets for the flavorful liquids and spices in your recipe to be absorbed.</p>
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<p>This recipe for General Tao's Tofu is a bit labor-intensive, but worth it if you have somebody to wow. It involves frying, so we don't make it often, but my meat-eating SO calls it "better than any Chinese take-out I've ever had."   <a href="http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=8769.0" target="_blank">http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=8769.0</a>  (Using real egg works fine here)</p>
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<p>Another simpler option is what we call Soy Sauce Tofu. The best thing about this method is that is tastes great at any temperature: hot off the griddle, room temp., or right out of the fridge (that is, IF you have any leftovers). You can serve it alongside stirfry or roasted veggies, use it to make a sandwich or eat it as a snack.</p>
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<p>Drain one block tofu (using above method). While draining, make marinade using following ingredients (I just guessed on the amounts. You can adjust everything to suit your taste:</p>
<p>Soy sauce (or tamari), enough to cover, appx 3/4 C</p>
<p>1 clove garlic, minced</p>
<p>1 tsp. honey</p>
<p>2 tsp. rice wine vinegar</p>
<p>1 tsp. minced fresh ginger</p>
<p>2 tsp. sesame oil</p>
<p>Red chili flakes or chili sauce (optional)</p>
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<p>Slice well-drained tofu into strips 1/4-1/3" thick and 1" wide. Place strips into marinade so that they are all covered . Let sit 1-6 hours or so, flipping once or twice to let the tofu get coated evenly. Pan fry the strips in a skillet, in a wok or on a griddle for 3-5 minutes per side. Baking would probably work too, though I've never tried it.</p>
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<p>Good luck and let us know what you try!</p>
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