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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This thread has been removed and won't be returned. Please note that MDC does not host discussions on formula, as per the <a href="http://www.mothering.com/mdc/mdc_useragreement.html" target="_blank">User Agreement</a>:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Mothering.com is the website of natural family living and advocates natural solutions to parenting challenges. We host discussion of nighttime parenting, loving discipline, natural birth, homebirth, successful breastfeeding, alternative and complementary home remedies, informed consent, and many other topics from a natural point of view. <b>We are not interested, however, in hosting discussions on</b> the merits of crying it out, physical punishment, <b>formula feeding</b>, elective cesarean section, routine infant medical circumcision, or mandatory vaccinations.</td>
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If you find yourself with a specific question, please feel free to post it in the appropriate forum; for example, a specific question on soothing without breastfeeding could go in LWAB, a specific question about the nutritional content of homemade formula if breasmilk is not available could go in Nutrition and Good Eating.<br><br>
Please <b>PM</b> me if you have any questions or concerns.<br><br>
Peace,<br>
Annette
 

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Premium Member
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34,292 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Some additional info on MDC's adherence to the WHO Code:<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Advertising formula, bottles, and pacifiers is a violation of the WHO Code of the Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes which Mothering and MDC voluntarily supports. So please refrain from posting such items for sale, trade, or giveaway, inclluding coupons for such items.<br><br>
Any questions or concerns can be addressed to me by email or PM. Thanks for your help and support in this matter.<br><br>
~Cynthia Mosher<br>
Administrator, MDC<br><br>
Edited to add:<br><br>
Since I have received a couple of questions in this regard I share this information for clarification:<br><br>
In the WHO document "The International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes" you'll find:<br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Article 2. Scope of the Code<br><br>
The Code applies to the marketing, and practices related thereto, of the following products: breastmilk substitutes, including infant formula; other milk products, foods and beverages, including bottle-fed complementary foods, when marketed or otherwise represented to be suitable, with or without modification, for use as a partial or total replacement of breast-milk; feeding bottles and teats. It also applies to their quality and availability, and to information concerning their use.</td>
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Pacifiers fall into the 'teats' category.<br><br>
Google "International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes pacifiers" and you'll find several documents and organizations that give bottles and pacifiers as an inclusion of the code.<br><br>
And this specifically, from the British Medical Journal, gives pacifiers as a product within the definition of "breast milk substitutes":<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;"><b>Monitoring compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes in west Africa...<br><br>
Labelling and promotion of breast milk substitutes in distribution points</b><br>
We surveyed 20 distribution points (14 pharmacies and six shops or supermarkets) in Togo and 46 distribution points (23 pharmacies and 23 shops or supermarkets) in Burkina Faso. We checked labelling of all breast milk substitutes against the standards set forth by article 9 of the code. <span style="color:#FF0000;">We found 40 products within the scope of the code (one sold only in Togo, five sold only in Burkina Faso, and 34 sold in both countries) that violated one or more of the provisions of the code (table 4). These products were infant formula, milk-cereal complementary foods, complementary foods based on vegetables or fruit, fruit juice, bottles, and pacifiers.</span> Most breast milk substitutes that did not comply with the labelling standards of the code were produced by international manufacturers, with Danone and Nestlé having an overwhelming presence. Over half (21) of the breast milk substitutes that violated labelling standards were manufactured by Danone; 11 were manufactured by Nestlé and eight by other national or international manufacturers. Table 4 gives details of labelling violations by manufacturer and type of breast milk substitute. We found special displays advertising specific brands of breast milk substitutes in six distribution points in Togo and 23 distribution points in Burkina Faso. One pharmacy in Togo distributed free samples of breast milk substitutes to mothers.</td>
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