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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone done it? We just did it with my newest. We clipped where the cord was breaking off after two days (it kept catching and pulling) and it was hanging by a thread - fell off the next day. Initially we weren't sure if we'd do it or not but it really felt right when he was born. I just couldn't separate him for no reason.<br><br>
My only regret is that I didn't take any PICTURES of him attached to the placenta. I only have one where you can see his cord and no one realizes what it is.<br><a href="http://www.natural-forces.com/xan/0-3months/xan1day.jpg" target="_blank">http://www.natural-forces.com/xan/0-3months/xan1day.jpg</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
No one else?<br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">:
 

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I haven't done it but am thinking about it for the next babe. Is 2 days typical, I thought it stayed on longer than that usually? Just curious. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
BTW - he is ADORABLE!!!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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We were planning it for ds, but I was hemorrhaging and when I stood up I fainted and the cord snapped (dp was holding ds, placenta still in). <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I was so disappointed and I still feel like I let ds down, like he was slightly traumatized by the whole ordeal....after our wonderful UC too...<br><br>
On a lighter note, we will absolutely be planning it for our next babe. I really want to feel and see the spiritual connection between ds and his placenta from the outside. You know its there on the inside but man, what I'd do to be a part of it on the outside. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/loveeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Loveeyes">: What love.... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Two days is on the low side of typical. I think with Lotus it's something like 2-8 days on average, and with typical clamp it's 4-11 days?... something like that.<br>
My daughter's was clamped and took 11-12 days to come off. I HATED IT.
 

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I definitely want to have a lotus birth. It's ironic that Dh who is too scared for a homebirth for this first baby and thinks it's rude to question doctors is relaxed about my lotus wish. Have yet to get my midwife on board - her eyes nearly popped out of her head when I mentioned it.
 

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Your little guy is simply adorable!!!! Congratulations!!!!<br><br>
I would like to do a lotus. But I have a feeling DH would not be so on-board with it. I am going to ask my MW about it next appt. to see what her experience has been.<br><br>
Did I read recently that the incidence of jaundice can be higher with lotus? Something about so much blood getting to baby vs. clamping and cutting?<br><br>
I like the idea of lotus for the simple reason that it makes more natural sense to me. I highly doubt our 'caveman' predecessors clamped and cut cords. Most likely just toted placenta with baby until they separated naturally....<br><br>
I saw a documentary some years back on neanderthal man (or something). They showed a birth, with the woman going out of the cave into the snow to birth, and a clanswoman going with to assist. The filmmakers made a huge deal of the helper biting the cord IMMEDIATELY after birth, as if it was some emergency-type thing that HAD to be done *sigh*. I was grouching at the screen that it was insane to think that a birthing woman would leave the warmth and safety of the cave to go out into the night, especially in bad weather!!!, to birth. And then the immediacy of the 'cord cutting' just really put me off. So so so soooooooooooooo sad that the filmmakers were so entrenched in the bizarre and unnatural paradigms about birth that they would portray birth as they did, woman LEAVING to birth, etc. (gotta rush out to the hospital, ya know!! *sigh*). I wondered at the time how the filmmakers would react and respond to lotus birth, if it would open their minds just a bit. Supposed experts, sheeeeesh<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sierratahoe</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6503065"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Did I read recently that the incidence of jaundice can be higher with lotus? Something about so much blood getting to baby vs. clamping and cutting?</div>
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I doubt this is true. If it was, it would also be true for delayed clamping - there is a point reached where the cord just stops pumping blood. If you delay clamping for an hour, for instance, your baby isn't getting any more or less blood than it would in a lotus birth - by that time the cord is like overcooked spaghetti.<br>
My daughter was delayed over an hour: no jaundice.<br>
My son was lotus: slight jaundice on the day the last of it separated. Could also have been the lighting, was so slight I couldn't tell if it was real or not<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sierratahoe</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6503065"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I like the idea of lotus for the simple reason that it makes more natural sense to me. I highly doubt our 'caveman' predecessors clamped and cut cords. Most likely just toted placenta with baby until they separated naturally....</div>
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I would think it's more natural to chew off the cord and eat the placenta some hours after birth once you're well into recovery: as many other mammals do. The afterbirth is just choked full of good stuff. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I can remember encouraging mother cats to eat the afterbirth when they appeared exhausted (my mother and I bred siamese) and it would always perk them up. Normally they did this themselves many hours after birth, but left the umbilical cords hanging on the babies (they would chew it off right where it met the placenta) until they fell off on their own a few days down the road.<br><br>
I chose lotus birth for personal reasons, not because it's more natural - I don't believe it is, but I do believe it's a very peaceful and personal thing to do.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>littleteapot</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6503224"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would think it's more natural to chew off the cord and eat the placenta some hours after birth once you're well into recovery: as many other mammals do.</div>
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i agree <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> i don't think i'm interested in a full lotus birth - partly because it just doesn't seem that natural to me, but i would like to wait until there's pretty much nothing going on with the cord... what would be a good time to wait? 1 hour? 2 hours? or how can i tell by looking at it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You can tell by looking at it. IT shrinks down and gets very white and limp. It really does look and feel like a very big piece of overcooked spaghetti.
 

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my husband and i are planning to lotus birth with our first. we hope to TTC in 2008.<br><br>
may i ask how cutting the cord is 'natural' and lotus birthing is 'unnatural?' i know it's a 'feeling' but i'm interested in the concept. because the opposite 'feels natural' to me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>zoebird</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6514868"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">may i ask how cutting the cord is 'natural' and lotus birthing is 'unnatural?' i know it's a 'feeling' but i'm interested in the concept. because the opposite 'feels natural' to me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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I would think that 'natural' would mean what is done in the animal kingdom, and what was done naturally, before medical involvement set the standards, in early human society. I don't know of any examples of lotus birth in those situations, but maybe I'm wrong. It would be fascinating to find out if there was.<br><br>
I think about having a lotus birth for my next baby. I definitely wont be cutting the cord for hours either way. My sons birth was very traumatic and I was so in shock I didn't even get to see them cut his cord. I was right there, and he was laying in front of me, but I didn't see the cord being cut, I have no memory of it. I honestly didn't think they would cut it until I asked them too. It was a practice of midwives, I thought they would be very respectful of that kind of thing. But they clamped and cut it almost immediately, and I had not say in it at all. I think it is kind of an assault to the mother and baby when a cord is cut before they are ready.
 

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in the animal kingdom, it's more common to have the cord on the baby until it falls off on it's own, not to cut it. very few animals 'cut' cords (with teeth). most just let them fall off in a few days. also, usually the cord separates from the placenta because of the drop from the mother to the ground for most animals. which is why it's not lotus birth per se.<br><br>
from what i've read about lotus birthing, it was common amoung pioneer women in the US--the early and mid 1800s, which i suppose you could consider pre-medical--because it was believed to make children heartier and make it easier for them to survive. there is some evidence in modern studies that demonstrate that lotus birthing has many health benefits for the child in regards to their immune system, as well as phsycological benefits.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>jennica</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6515468"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would think that 'natural' would mean what is done in the animal kingdom, and what was done naturally, before medical involvement set the standards, in early human society. I don't know of any examples of lotus birth in those situations, but maybe I'm wrong. It would be fascinating to find out if there was.<br><br>
I think about having a lotus birth for my next baby. I definitely wont be cutting the cord for hours either way. My sons birth was very traumatic and I was so in shock I didn't even get to see them cut his cord. I was right there, and he was laying in front of me, but I didn't see the cord being cut, I have no memory of it. I honestly didn't think they would cut it until I asked them too. It was a practice of midwives, I thought they would be very respectful of that kind of thing. But they clamped and cut it almost immediately, and I had not say in it at all. I think it is kind of an assault to the mother and baby when a cord is cut before they are ready.</div>
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I am planning on a possible lotus birth too for similar reasons. This time we will get a chance to do what is right for our baby without unneccessary intervention.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>zoebird</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6514868"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">my husband and i are planning to lotus birth with our first. we hope to TTC in 2008.<br><br>
may i ask how cutting the cord is 'natural' and lotus birthing is 'unnatural?' i know it's a 'feeling' but i'm interested in the concept. because the opposite 'feels natural' to me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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I also think it would be more natural to chew the cord off. Why carry both baby and placenta around? If you're thinking of the need to perhaps be mobile soon after birth, its just not practical...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I wanted to do one because of my first son. He was safe inside me and did not start dying until they cut his cord. It was his lifeline and his existance.<br>
When my son Xan was born I saw his cord and couldn't bear to separate him from it. I needed him to go gradually. We all needed it. his birth was very healing for us, and keeping him intact was important to that closure. I couldn't remove his lifeline unless every last drop of me that he needed was gone and he could truly be on his own and ready for this world.
 

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kimiji:<br><br>
it makes sense in a 'natural' way to chew the cord off--but i also do not plan on being or needing to be very mobile for the first week after giving birth. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
jujubees:<br><br>
the first time i read about lotus birth, i thought it sounded really fascinating. the woman writing about it--Jeanine Parvati Baker--wrote about how her son had his own 'independence ritual' (or something similar) when he removed the cord himself. I thought about this a great deal, because i found it so interesting. In many ways, the birth is the mother separating the child from her body. But loosing the placenta--or letting go of it--is the child separating from it's mother in a sense.<br><br>
i started to research the 'benefits' of lotus birthing after this--and most people talked about the emotional benefits that they experienced having a lotus birth. Then a read an article by person in prenatal psychology where they talked about different aspects of birth having certain psychological effects (ultimately unknown, but what could potentially cause psychological damage), including the cutting of the cord.<br><br>
the concept was that in utero, the cord is another appendage of the baby. the baby has facial features, arms and legs, torso and fingers. the baby can feel all of these thigns (as parts of the body), but can also feel them with his/her hands. there is an exploration and awareness of the body that seems to be present during the developmental stage. Included in this awareness (internal feeling and ability to touch/play with the different parts of the body) is an awareness of the cord and placenta as well.<br><br>
Thus, when cutting the cord or removing the placenta, it's no different to the child than circumcision or removing a finger or toe. Simply because we know it doesn't have use for the now-born body, it doesn't mean that the child doesn't know this!<br><br>
Aside from this, there is also a good deal of evidence that the connection to the uterus has a myriad of health benefits from providing comforting hormones, nutrients, and oxygen while still pulsing, and likely the baby still gets benefit after the pulsing has stopped (but what is unknown). So, there are some health benefits as well.<br><br>
so, that solidified my desire for lotus birth.
 

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That's a beautiful explanation Zoebird. It makes perfect sense. Thanks for sharing!
 
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