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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My DD has been doing Singapore Math for about a month now and it is going so well. I first heard of the program here on this forum, so thank you!!!<br><br>
What follows is just background info....<br><br>
We moved from California to Arizona at the beginning of the year, and the math here is even less challenging for DD than it was in Cali! My DD is 6 and in first grade. I would say she is probably on the low end of the gifted scale. She finished the 1B workbook in a few weeks and is now on the 2A workbook. She is enjoying it!<br><br>
When we were living in CA, I mentioned to DD's teacher at a conference that DD thought the work was too easy, etc. This was not received well - the teacher gave me kind of an icy look. I mentioned that I was considering getting DD evaluated for a gifted program when we finally settle somewhere for a while (we are military). I did not get a good response to this either. DD's teacher said that gifted kids have a "different" way of thinking and even behaving. Whereas DD is very "well behaved", quiet, and conformist.<br><br>
The teacher also said that the gifted tests measured "different" things, and offhandedly said, "you're not an engineer, are you?" I kind of shut down at that point. No, I'm not an engineer, but what does that have to do with it? The teacher's opinion was that DD was a non-gifted high achiever. (I thought that was ridiculous!) That evening I wrote DD's teacher a longish email and mentioned what (fabulous) schools I had gone to. I didn't really want to, but I felt very defensive after the engineer remark.<br><br>
After all this DD started second grade math but even that I could tell was not the right fit for her. What to do, what to do...<br><br>
After getting to AZ I decided that 1. Teachers for the most part do not want to have to cater to a child, especially one who is not charismatic, and 2. DD is not SO smart that she needs to skip a grade. So here in AZ I decided not to have the awkward conversation with the teacher and just supplement at home. I had tried supplementing in the past but had only tried those review books from the bookstore and they were either too easy or too hard and didn't really teach.<br><br>
But Singapore is just right for DD! We're not at the point where she wants me to teach her from the textbook - it seems like the workbook is self-explanatory for her so far. We put the Singapore math book over by her library books, and she works on it when she feels like it. I feel like my daughter crumples under any sort of pressure. She has to feel like she is the one taking the initiative. She loves to read for fun, and I had this epiphany - why can't she do math for fun?! And now she does <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
I like reading this forum. Your kids are much brighter than mine, but I still get some helpful ideas. Thanks!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>edster</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13272156"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">DD's teacher said that gifted kids have a "different" way of thinking and even behaving. Whereas DD is very "well behaved", quiet, and conformist.<br><br>
The teacher also said that the gifted tests measured "different" things, and offhandedly said, "you're not an engineer, are you?"</div>
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Ooooooooooh. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/Cuss.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="cuss"> I would have been so mad. Heck, I'm mad just hearing about it. Many gifted kids are quiet and well-behaved. Many PG kids are quiet and well-behaved.<br><br>
When my sister (MG and accelerated) saw her guidance counselor in high school, he said: "You're doing very well. What do your parents do for a living?" And then, when my sister revealed that our mother was a housewife and our father a blue-collar worker, he said, "OH. You're doing VERY, VERY well." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: What a <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/censored.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="censored">.<br><br>
Anyway, welcome to the forum. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Oh, and in my state you, as a parent, are able to refer your child for testing without a teacher's approval or consent. It might be the same in Arizona. And if it is, I'd go for it.
 

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Hmmmm...I have a very quiet well-behaved profoundly gifted girl. If the teacher thought quiet and conformist couldn't be gifted, I guess she wouldn't have qualified either!<br><br>
We loved the Singapore primary series! I remember getting the first books at a used homeschool curriculum sale. They were the 3A and 3B books. Dd was doing 2nd grade K12 at the time. She saw the books in the car and wanted to look at them on the way home. She had a dozen pages filled out by the time we got home, so I decided they must be a decent fit. LOL<br><br>
My dd was the crumple under pressure girl at that age as well. Just keep having fun with her and I bet you will see her confidence bloom. My dd at 10.5 is pretty darn bold these days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>no5no5</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13272714"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
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Anyway, welcome to the forum. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Oh, and in my state you, as a parent, are able to refer your child for testing without a teacher's approval or consent. It might be the same in Arizona. And if it is, I'd go for it.</div>
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We are in AZ now, but we won't be here long. DD will finish 1st grade here and we'll move again over the summer, and I have no idea where to. (Gotta love the military!) It would be great if we end up somewhere with gifted classes. Our school district here in AZ doesn't have anything.<br><br>
Thanks for the welcome <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/innocent.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shy">
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mom2ponygirl</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13274039"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Hmmmm...I have a very quiet well-behaved profoundly gifted girl. If the teacher thought quiet and conformist couldn't be gifted, I guess she wouldn't have qualified either!<br><br><br>
My dd was the crumple under pressure girl at that age as well. Just keep having fun with her and I bet you will see her confidence bloom. My dd at 10.5 is pretty darn bold these days.</div>
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That is great to hear. Thanks!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">
 

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I love this curriculum too. I am using it to teach pre-service elementary teachers... they struggle with the bar diagrams while my kids love them and can solve problems requiring algebra with them.
 

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That would have annoyed me (and I do have an engineering degree)! Why would she ask that?<br><br>
I was definitely a gifted child, but never acted out at school. I barely spoke at school, did exactly what the teacher told me, etc. I also remember school being so incredibly easy.<br><br>
It is sad to think that some teachers don't want to deal with differentiating for different ability levels.<br><br>
We are diggin Singapore Math as well. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>edster</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13272156"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">The teacher also said that the gifted tests measured "different" things, and offhandedly said, "you're not an engineer, are you?" I kind of shut down at that point. No, I'm not an engineer, but what does that have to do with it?</div>
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This keeps bugging me. My father was a mechanic, my mother a secretary. My brother has an IQ high enough that he kept hitting the ceiling of tests when they tested him 25 years ago in school and never did get an accurate IQ. Our parents careers had nothing to do with his ability level.<br><br>
Additionally, even though their careers weren't prestigious ones that would lead you to believe they were highly intelligent or educated didn't mean they weren't. Both my parents are very well read and very intelligent. My mother has several degree's. She's just interested in such a variety of things that it translates to several associates and bachelors degrees rather than an advanced degree. My other brother tests as moderately gifted and he choose to be a mechanic like his father. I fail to see how choosing a profession that only required an associates of applied science degree has anything to do with his intelligence or with the intelligence and ability level his children will have.
 
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