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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had low progesterone levels with my first pregnancy and was placed on prometriom pills 3 times a day thru my first trimester. This time around I was hoping to just use natural progesterone cream. Anyone have experience with it working for them instead of pills? I had tried npc while ttc my first and my levels still were low, so I wonder if I need more or...?<br>
Thanks for any help.<br>
Oh, and are prometrium pills dangerous or am I just overly worried wanting to only take NPC?
 

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Hi there!<br><br>
Thought I'd chime in. I don't know about prometrium. I have had three progesterone babies and I used the suppositories for all of them. You have to go to a compounding pharmacy to get them, but they use natural progesterone, not synthetic when they make these.<br><br>
I developed an allergy to something in the base of the suppositories this time and had to switch to an oral preparation. However, I used a compounding pharmacy and they made up a sublingual preparation using natural progesterone that absorbs quickly into your system.<br><br>
You may want to look into those options. I have not had any experience with the progesterone cream so I can't speak to it's effectiveness at all.<br><br>
hth,<br>
Cristina
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>stayathomecristi</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Hi there!<br><br>
Thought I'd chime in. I don't know about prometrium. I have had three progesterone babies and I used the suppositories for all of them. You have to go to a compounding pharmacy to get them, but they use natural progesterone, not synthetic when they make these.<br><br>
I developed an allergy to something in the base of the suppositories this time and had to switch to an oral preparation. However, I used a compounding pharmacy and they made up a sublingual preparation using natural progesterone that absorbs quickly into your system.<br><br>
You may want to look into those options. I have not had any experience with the progesterone cream so I can't speak to it's effectiveness at all.<br><br>
hth,<br>
Cristina</div>
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I am sorry but what is a compounding pharmacy? And does insurance cover these types of pharamacies? Are they expensive?
 

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Another question regarding the compounding pharmacy (I know where two are in my area), did you need some sort of prescription, or did you just go in and ask for it? Thanks. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br><br>
Sorry I don't have an answer for the OP. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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Compounding pharmacies are usually covered by insurance. I say that and am still waiting for reimbursement from my insurance company.<br><br>
When I lived in MA I got my progesterone suppositories from the local CVS--they did some compounding, but not as much as a full-fledged compounding pharmacy. Now that I live in VA, I learned that the CVS's down there do not dabble in that, but they were able to refer me to a compounding pharmacy nearby.<br><br>
Compounding pharmacies often will take nasty medicine prescribed for children and add special flavors. They can also make many meds into different forms than they are usually given in. For example, a true compounding pharmacy can help someone who is trying to quit smoking and create nicotine lollipops for them. Progesterone can be made into suppositories, vaginal creams, a topical cream to rub on the inside of arms and legs, and oral preparations such as sublingual drops or tablets that dissolve in the mouth.<br><br>
You absolutely need a prescription from your doctor for any meds distributed by a compounding pharmacy. They are a real pharmacy and subject to all the laws regarding the dispensing of meds. The prescription will have to be for the exact form that you desire as well, so it's a good idea to speak with them first and then to the doc about getting the script.<br><br>
HTH, let me know if you have any other questions :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks for that info. I am not sure if I want to get prometrium or rx'd progeterone treatments. I guess I should of reworded my question. I was wondering if RX'ed progesterone, like Prometrium (or even compounded) are dangerous in anyway, compared to Natural progesterone cream used over the counter? I also wondered how much NPC to take?
 

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NPC has such low levels of p compared to prometrium that I doubt you could afford NPC as a good alternative (you'd need to rub about 9 jars on your body each day to make up for the amount of p in prometrium.)<br><br>
Prometrium is a bio-identical form of p, you can't get any better than that. It's not synthetic. And, prometrium is probably less expensive for you than the compounded version the pp mentioned, only because compunded prescriptions usually have a higher co-pay than a traditional prescription.<br><br>
I took prometrium and felt comfortable taking it knowing that it is bio-identical and not a synthetic form of p.<br><br>
GL!
 

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I agree with PP--I would NOT take an OTC preparation of progesterone cream. You would need way too much to be effective. PP also mentioned that Prometrium is not synthetic (I had no idea). If that's the case, then I would think it would be safe. Perhaps you can ask your doc for the insert?<br><br>
The current preparation I am taking from the compounding pharmacy costs about $40 per month (sublingual drops which are supposed to be more bio-available than the pills), just to give you an idea of cost. The suppositories are slightly higher (about $50 per month). Again, your insurance may cover Prometrium, Progesterone suppositories or another preparation from the compounding pharmacy.<br><br>
IMHO--if your progesterone is low, then it makes sense to supplement. Mine is low every time and I am confident that I would have no babies if it weren't for supplementation.<br><br>
Hope you find peace in your decision whatever it may be <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>peilover010202</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">NPC has such low levels of p compared to prometrium that I doubt you could afford NPC as a good alternative (you'd need to rub about 9 jars on your body each day to make up for the amount of p in prometrium.)<br><br>
Prometrium is a bio-identical form of p, you can't get any better than that. It's not synthetic. And, prometrium is probably less expensive for you than the compounded version the pp mentioned, only because compunded prescriptions usually have a higher co-pay than a traditional prescription.<br><br>
I took prometrium and felt comfortable taking it knowing that it is bio-identical and not a synthetic form of p.<br><br>
GL!</div>
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<b><br>
Wow that is great to know. I just bought two big bottles of Progest (NPC) online. Wonder if I should send it back for a refund?<br>
Also, I an not going to an OB this time around, I am doing everything thru a CPM (not a CNM) and I wonder if they are allowed to write RX for Prometrium or if I should go in and see my old OB???<br></b>
 

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I have no idea if your midwife can prescribe it for you. But, your old ob would be able to for sure.
 
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