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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd like to try making my own almond milk. I've found some good instructions online, but have a question. The instructions I found said I need almonds without shells, and I'm not sure exactly how to find them? I looked in the bulk section at Wegmans. I saw whole raw almonds but I assume those have shells. I saw chopped/halved, but they looked like they had shells too. I usually buy blanched slivered almonds for salads, would those work for making almond milk too?<br><br>
Other question is, after I strain it through a cheesecloth, is what's left almond meal? How can I use that?<br><br>
ETA: Forgot one more question - for those who make almond milk, do you add any vanilla or sweetener? If so, how much?
 

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Are you maybe confusing shells with the brown skin on almonds? Most of the almonds I get at the store don't have shells on them (except for ones they sell at Christmas time), but all except for the blanched ones have the skin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ola_</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15359905"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Are you maybe confusing shells with the brown skin on almonds? Most of the almonds I get at the store don't have shells on them (except for ones they sell at Christmas time), but all except for the blanched ones have the skin.</div>
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Yes, yes I am <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
So would any of the types that I saw work just fine, or would one be better than the others?
 

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No idea, sorry! Maybe someone else can help? (bump <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">)
 

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To make almond milk, you really want raw, or at least not roasted, almonds. Here in Cali all almonds are irradiated, so not raw, but definitely not roasted.<br><br>
If you can find them, blanched (skinned) almonds are the way to go. Don't worry though, if you can't find them or they are too pricy. It's easy to do on your own.<br><br>
Basically, what I do is soak the almonds overnight-24hrs (minimum of 8 hrs, more is good)<br><br>
Drain and rinse them. Throw them into a pot of boiling water for 30 seconds, then strain and throw into a bowl of cold water. Then I just pop out the almonds from the skin. Be careful though, those things like to really fly. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"><br><br>
If you want to go all raw with no boiling, you can peel off the skin after soaking. However, it's going to take a loooooong time to do so. I don't care for raw milk, so I'm fine with 'home' blanching the almonds.<br><br>
I throw them into the food processor with a pinch of salt and some granulated sugar to grind them medium-fine. Too fine and you will clog your filter. Too chunky and you don't get a lot of milk. You don't need to add sugar, but I like to add a bit of it (can't taste it in the final product) since it seems to make grinding it a bit easier.<br><br>
To get lots of milk and get rid of the 'raw' taste (I don't like it), I add the meal and half the water to a pot, bring to a boil, let boil 5 minutes, let cool and strain it. Then mix with the rest of the water. If I want a vanilla flavor, I add in the vanilla extract during the last 2 min of boiling. I don't like the alcohol flavor it leaves otherwise, and 2 min of boiling really gets rid of it without getting rid of the vanilla flavor. I like mine plain though.<br><br>
My proportions make 1 gallon of almond milk:<br><br>
2 c dry, skin on almond.<br><br>
Put into a bowl with double the amount of water to soak.<br><br>
To the grind, I add 1/3c granulated sugar and half a teaspoon of salt.<br><br>
To the pot, I add half a gallon of water (8 cups), and boil.<br><br>
Once cooled and strained, I add in the other 8 cups, stir and enjoy!<br><br>
ETA: With the vanilla, I add a teaspoon or two.<br>
I've used honey for sweetening but didn't care for how it overpowered the almond milk.<br><br>
The left over is almond meal. I use it in baked goods. I mix it with flour to make a nice cake-esque treat, usually with whatever ripe fruit needs to be used up mixed in.<br><br>
I've also mixed it with enough flour and a couple eggs to resemble cookie dough in thickness. Mix in your 'flavorings' (coconut, chocolate chips, spices), and bake like a regular cookie (think 350* for 1-15+ minutes).<br><br>
Ami
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow, thanks so much for the detailed response! I can get blanched slivered almonds with no skin, so I'll try with those first. They're $6.99/lb, so if I love making the almond milk and can find almonds cheaper raw with skins I will try that.<br><br>
Another REALLY dumb question... where do I buy cheesecloth? Do I have to go to a fabric store or can I find it at Target in the kitchen section?
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>SollysMom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15366268"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Wow, thanks so much for the detailed response! I can get blanched slivered almonds with no skin, so I'll try with those first. They're $6.99/lb, so if I love making the almond milk and can find almonds cheaper raw with skins I will try that.<br><br>
Another REALLY dumb question... where do I buy cheesecloth? Do I have to go to a fabric store or can I find it at Target in the kitchen section?</div>
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Not a dumb question at all! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Cheesecloth can be found in the kitchen section of a regular grocery store (near the spatulas & stuff) so I think Target might carry it.<br><br>
To be honest, I'd just use a regular piece of cotton fabric like a kitchen towel or, for me, I use a piece of pantyhose that's never been used and is only used for food. Since the almond milk is cool, it's not a big deal. Cheesecloth is a pain to clean. Actually, I've never been able to clean it. It always comes apart and tangles up. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked"><br><br>
Ami
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have tons of never-been-worn pantyhose, that's a great idea! Hopefully I have time to try this tomorrow <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK so I'm glad I tried only a single cup my first shot, because it was a fail. I tried the pantyhose, but they must have been too-fancy pantyhose or something because the milk just sat on the fabric and didn't drip through at all (I had cut out a square and secured it over a glass with a rubberband. So then I tried a paper towel and the same thing happened, so I gave up. As I was making coffee this morning, I got the idea that maybe a coffee filter would work, so maybe I'll try that.
 

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I do mine a little differently. I use whole, raw, unblanched almonds (the kind with the skins on). The night before plan to make my milk, I put the almonds in a jar and cover them with water. I let them soak overnight. The next day, I drain and rinse the almonds. Then, I dump them in my blender (with the skins on - it doesn't really make a difference as the skin does not get into the milk), add water and blend until they are "chopped" very fine. It only takes a little while. After that, I strain the "milk" through a nut milk bag into a jar. I don't flavor or sweeten mine, so I have no advice for you regarding that. I use 1 cup of almonds to about 4 - 4.5 cups of water. If I want less, I halve the recipe and use 1/2 cup of almonds to about 2.5 cups of water.<br><br>
You probably had problems straining your nut milk because the almond pulp clogged the nylon. I find that I have to squeeze the nut milk bag to get the milk all the way out. Try using the toe of the nylon as a bag. Pour the pulp and milk mixture into the "bag" and squeeze the liquid out. As for the leftover pulp...I'm still trying to find things to do with it. Right now, I just put it in the freezer so that I can use it when I figure something out. There are a lot of recipes for raw foods made with almond pulp (i.e. raw cookies and crackers made in the dehydrator).<br><br>
Good luck. After a while, you'll get the hang of it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
Edited to add instructions for using the toe of the nylon as a nut milk bag...
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>willowbelle</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15402025"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You probably had problems straining your nut milk because the almond pulp clogged the nylon. I find that I have to squeeze the nut milk bag to get the milk all the way out. Try using the toe of the nylon as a bag. Pour the pulp and milk mixture into the "bag" and squeeze the liquid out. As for the leftover pulp...I'm still trying to find things to do with it. Right now, I just put it in the freezer so that I can use it when I figure something out. There are a lot of recipes for raw foods made with almond pulp (i.e. raw cookies and crackers made in the dehydrator).<br><br>
Good luck. After a while, you'll get the hang of it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
Edited to add instructions for using the toe of the nylon as a nut milk bag...</div>
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Yea, this. I use half of the leg part, with the toe attached.<br><br>
You need to squeeze the bag, if you see any youtube videos, they do that too. The thing is, don't grind it too fine because then when it settles it make a fine 'paste' and won't let out the milk. The texture should be like fine couscous or a bit bigger, like uncooked quinoa grains. Start with a light squeeze, then get firmer too. I've forced out pulp before my being a bit too, ahem, vigorous.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="innocent"><br><br>
It's not like a coffee drip. Think of it more like straining the pulp & seeds for raspberry jam. It's thicker, so will either take forever to drip or the grounds will settle and not let it through.<br><br>
Ami
 
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