Mothering Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<span><span style="font-family:'Century Gothic';">So I've tentatively decided to use fitteds/prefolds with covers for the newborn stage. I'm very keen on making my own covers, therefore, as I am an avid knitter. Colour me naive, but I don't know the first thing about knitting covers. I saw a site another MDCer posted, but what I don't get is whether they must be felted? And, if you use covers with prefolds, do you just fasten the prefold with a snappi or pins and then put the knitted cover on? Forgive my ignorance, but I'm new to this.<br><br>
If you don't felt (or even if you do), how do you wash the covers/longies/etc?<br>
What yarns have other mamas had success with?<br><br>
What patterns do you follow?</span></span>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,858 Posts
I'm not an expert, but I'll try to answer what I know!<br>
You can use any wool yarn, even wool blends can work, provided it's at least 50% wool. Obviously, the higher the wool content the better. You dont have to felt the cover, I just crochet it and lanolize it and use it. You CAN felt it, it will lose some of it's stretch, but it will become even more water proof. To prep them, you will need to lanolize them. Basically you fill your sink with lukewarm water, stick the pants in there. THen you microwave a pea sized amount of lanolin (available at health food stores or Lansinoh for breastfeeding mamas works great) in some water. Shake the lanolin and water mixture until it becomes cloudy, then it will be emulsified. Add to the sink, pouring directly on the pants, concentrating on the croth area. Let them soak for at least 20 minutes. When you need to wash them, you do a luke warm hand wash in the sink with a wool wash (not woolite) or baby shampoo. Then follow that with lanolizing. You should only have to do that once a month, unless you get poop on them, of course! As far as what goes under the wool, anything will work. If you are using a prefold, you will need to either sanppi it or pin it. Wool is not like PUL or nylon in the sense that it is a natural fiber, so if wetness sits on it long enough, it will get damp, but honestly that's never happened to us. We change frequently, and even in the car or overnight, wool has never leaked or wet her clothing. You can use sheeps wool, alpaca, cashmere, or I think even llama wool. There are alot of different blends out there. Ok, I think I gave you as much info as I have, hth!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<span><span style="font-family:Georgia;">Thanks for all the advice! Do you know if I can use superwash wool (i.e wool that wouldn't felt even if I tried)?</span></span><br><br><br>
Edited to say that I found the sad answer (NO!) in another thread. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,858 Posts
I believe that there ARE some kinda of superwash that you can use. From what I understand, superwash wool has an acrylic coating that makes it washer friendly. But it's not the superwash you get at the fabric store or Micheals, it's some stuff you have to order online. Check out diapersewingdivas.com or diaperswappers.com they are both AWESOME for infor about this stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,175 Posts
You can even use straight-up acrylic; it's not the same thing, but it can be handy. I like both. Acrylic doesn't have the "magic" properties of wool for resisting odor, so you have to wash it much more often; on the other hand, you can throw it in the wash along with your diapers. I wash mine on hot and dry it on hot, and it's fine. I like having some acrylic so that I can wash it up quickly and easily, and some wool because it's nicer! (I made my daughter some acrylic longies out of a knitted baby blanket--from Buy Buy Baby--and they are super soft and breathable. I know that many knitters look down their noses at acrylic, and I can see why--wool is nicer--but there are definite pluses to the acrylic, too!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,279 Posts
I'm doing acrylic for the newborn stage since poo blowouts seem inevitable. They'll be easier to wash... and I'm under the impression that if you wash them in the REGULAR (non-diaper) laundry and use fabric softener, they will somewhat repel the pee so I'm hoping that works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,738 Posts
Come on over to the yarn forum! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
That said, you can do covers out of wool or acrylic. acrylic get treated more like PUL covers in regards to washing...more frequently because they can get stinky.<br><br>
You don't need to felt covers really. I know some do for nighttime covers but we've never had a problem with them and we've never had one purposfully felted. All my covers are either pull on with a drawstring or velcro. I know there are patterns that you can use a snappi on (such as the Tickly Turdle crocheted wrap) and there is an LTK pattern that uses buttons (Ribby wrap). It all depends on you and your preference really.<br><br>
I wash my wool in the washer. I have no felting and no problems in regards to the washing. I just hang to dry so as long as your washer has a setting for it ( you can test it out by throwing in something wool and seeing if it felts) you can have the "ease" of care that so many seem to get with acrylic/pul covers. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I used homemade wool covers almost exclusively from day one with my daughter. The only one I bought was an aristocrats knit cover, which I loved, but couldn't afford more than one of. I used it mostly for nighttime, since it was so thick.<br><br>
PATTERN<br>
I knit almost all my covers using the free pattern from Fern and Faerie.<br><a href="http://www.fernandfaerie.com/freesoakerpattern.html" target="_blank">www.fernandfaerie.com/freesoakerpattern.html</a><br>
I knit 4 before she was born and many more after that. I usually had anywhere from 4 to 8 in rotation, 8 was more than enough. I'm glad I didn't make too many before she was born, as adjusting the fit became necessary sooner than I expected due to some very chunky thighs <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Three of the covers I knit before she was born didn't fit by the end of the first week. I didn't expect a 9 pounder!<br>
If you are somewhat experienced with knitting you should have no problems with the pattern. The changes I made were knitting the ribbing at the top for the waistband on smaller needles, I think I went two sizes smaller and also enlongating the waistband, you can always roll it down if you need to, but you more likely to have a contained blowout the further up your waistband goes. I also added more stitches around the legs, and I knitted them twice as long as I wanted and then folded the leg back over itself and stitched it loosely down to the cover at the top of the leg, so I had a leg that was double thickness. I did that because I couldn't come up with the right bind off that was elastic enough to not leave red marks on baby's chubby legs.<br><br>
WASHING/FELTING<br>
I tried felting a cover and didn't have much luck, I found it wasn't flexible enough and much more bulky than it needed to be. However, I did partially felt some of my covers which worked out well. I just used some hot water and dish soap in the sink and scrubbed the areas that I wanted a little more coverage on, maily the crotch and backside. I tried this first with a cover I knit one size too large (accidently) and it worked well for me. I wouldn't felt the waistband or the legs though, I don't think the ribbing would retain it's elasticity well enough.<br><br>
I only washed when the cover had poop on it, and then I just washed it (by hand) as any other handknit woolen, and then lanolized it with some lanolin disolved in hot water first and then added to some cool water. I would soak for 30 minutes or so and then dried them flat on a couple towels.<br><br>
YARNS<br>
At first I used Cascade 220, which works very well, then I tried Lambs Pride, worsted (although, one time I used "bulky" instead of "worsted" and ended up with a slightly larger cover that was very dense, it ended up being my favorite for a long time) it's 85% wool 15% mohair. Both yarns worked well and are fairly affordable.<br><br><br>
When using wool covers (especially homemade, single layer, knit ones), compression is not your friend. A cover that fits snugly will feel damp sooner than a looser cover. Also, when strapped into the car seat, I would feel a damp (never wet) feeling if she was really wet. The pressure from the straps on the seat were the culprit, not the cover.<br><br>
I used mostly fitted diapers, and occasionally a contour or a prefold closed with a snappy and had no troubles. I just pulled the covers up and over the diaper and tied it closed with the knit I-cord.<br><br><br>
Hope that helps, I'm not an expert, but it's what worked for me. We have baby number two due in a few months, (first one is 19 months and out of diapers) so I'm getting my needles ready...<br>
Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for such a helpful and thorough explanation! I appreciate it.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top