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I've been researching and I think I've finally decided to give Singapore Math a try. I like that it's supposed to teach how to think about math, but I'm worried that it doesn't have any manipulatives to go with it. I haven't actually seen the books yet, so maybe it's evident when you see what problems are offered what hands-on materials would help to teach (?). If you use Singapore, what manipulatives would you recommend for the Pre-k books? Any other supplements you think would be necessary?

Thanks!
 

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If you really want to use manipulatives, you can get some cuisinaire rods and use them as a supplement. If you want to have the manipulatives be an integral part of the program, you probably would like Miquon math.

My kids were never jazzed about manipulatives, even though I thought they were a great idea. We never used them and that's why we switched to Singapore.

Apologies in advance for the unsolicited advice, but for a kiddo as young as yours, you could probably give her all the same math with some really fun games. I think the books by Peggy Kaye are fabulous for this.
 

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You won't need any. There are lots of pictures that serve much of the same role, and exercises that involve using pencils, paper clips, etc. as manipulatives. The pre-Primary Singapore programs are very basic and are really just a way of formalizing the sorts of things most kids pick up through real life. I think they're good in that they don't over-teach symbolic academics to kids who are too young, but in a sense what makes them good also makes them rather unnecessary. They were a fun diversion for one of my kids when he wanted to "do math" like his big sister but was still too young for a real math program. I certainly wouldn't have gone out of my way to find a program for a child at this level who wasn't insisting on a workbook.

Miranda
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the response! I had looked at Miquon, but read some iffy reviews about it - maybe I will look into it in more depth.

Benjalo - Thanks also for your advice - unsolicited advice is what the internet is all about, isn't it? :LOL I'm not familiar with the author you mentioned, but I am interested to find out more, so I'm glad you pointed me in that direction.

We already use Family Math, which is basically games/projects/activities that we do together introducing early math concepts. I would be using Singapore in a very relaxed way, when dd is interested. I want to be able to expose her to as much as possible, going into more depth as she gets older and is ready. DD has a voracious appetite for knowledge and we are always at the library following-up on her questions. Some topics she has long-term interest and we keep researching and doing related projects/activities, other topics of course, she learns a bit about and it's enough! I think, though, that the opportunity to learn has to be presented and, for me anyway, I can at least present some more "formal" information to her - if she's interested, we continue, if not, we put it away for later. She is very hands-on though, so while I like what I've read about Singapore, I know that without something to physically hold/do, it might not work as well.
 

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Isn't your daughter, like, not even three? Of course she's hands-on! Kids that age, no matter how bright and 'advanced,' are very concrete and need to touch and hold things. That's why most people would not even consider introducing a curriculum at that age. Curricula are, by their very natures, at least partly abstract and visual-symbolic.

Miquon is a pretty hands-on curriculum, and I love it, but it's still got a lot of visual-symbolic stuff, and since it gets into integrating addition, subtraction and multiplication within the first half of the first book, it's not a suitable choice for a 2 or 3-year-old. Most people say "wait until 6", though one of my three very precocious kids started it successfully at 4 1/2. She was already comfortably adding and subtracting within 20 before starting it, though. My most precocious kid, who started algebra 'round about her 10th birthday, didn't start Miquon until 6.

By the time your dd is 5 or so, she'll be much less hands-on, I'd wager. That's the natural evolution of learning styles in most kids -- they become more able to learn through the abstract. At that point a curriculum might make sense. In the meantime, I personally would avoid a curriculum entirely.

Miranda
 

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I agree with moominmamma in that your daughter is probably still too young for a formal curriculum.

There are lots of fun ways to play and learn math concepts at the same time.
How about a board game like Chutes and Ladders?
Maybe you could have a special day of the week where you bake something together?
I also agree with the pp about Peggy Kaye's Games for .... books. Most of them would still be above your DD, but you could certainly find some that would work, and perhaps modify some of the others to make them more appropriate for her.
Just talking about numbers during your day, or borrowing books from your library that have a math twist is fun too. One of our favorites is Anno's Counting Book.
Get a long piece of butcher paper or the like. Trace her body out and then have her use something like paper clips or Lego/Duplo blocks or whatever to "see how many tall she is".
We have Cuisenaire rods, but the kids use them to make roads, towers, etc. I've never talked about them with regards to numbers.
We also have pattern blocks which are also a lot of fun to play with, make mosaics-even for DH and me!

Our oldest DS will be five at the end of the month, and while he has a good grasp on math concepts, I still may wait until he is six to introduce a formal curriculum. When the time is right, it will be Miquon.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bebelus
I've been researching and I think I've finally decided to give Singapore Math a try. I like that it's supposed to teach how to think about math, but I'm worried that it doesn't have any manipulatives to go with it. I haven't actually seen the books yet, so maybe it's evident when you see what problems are offered what hands-on materials would help to teach (?). If you use Singapore, what manipulatives would you recommend for the Pre-k books? Any other supplements you think would be necessary?

Thanks!
I've been using Singapore for 3 years. In the Pre-K books, there are suggestions for manipulatives at the bottom of every lesson. They are mostly items you would have around the house. For example, to practice one-to-one correspondence, you could have teacups and saucers.

Another book that I think is fabulous for encouraging mathematical thinking is Family Math for Young Children. It has lots of hands on activities to do with kids. I am thinking about not purchasing the pre-K books for my daughter and just using that.

Hope this helps.
Ellen
Homeschooling mom to Mark 11, Tom 9, and Meg 4
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by ellebelle
Another book that I think is fabulous for encouraging mathematical thinking is Family Math for Young Children. It has lots of hands on activities to do with kids. I am thinking about not purchasing the pre-K books for my daughter and just using that.

that's what I was going to recommend...but I think you said you have it already....it's for my 6 year old, not my 3 year old though...he's too busy playing with firetrucks :LOL
 

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We've used Singapore for dd Pre-k to 3rd grade. IN the early years, and sometimes now, we've used the Cuisinaire Rods, but the most favored are the Counting Bears found at WalMart,Target,etc..

I am not clear if you're saying your dc is extremely gifted and *that's* the reason you are looking for a math curriculum, or if you are just looking ahead, or if you are really considering starting your dd with one now.

ITA that unless she is *really* gifted, probably giving her manipulatives to play with, puzzles to put together, sorting activities, and board games are best for a dc her age. Real life learning is so easy at this age as well. "How many dolls do you have?" "How many scoops of flour does mommy need to bake this cake?" "WOW!!! This is a huge watermelon! Let's see how much it weighs!" And so on....

My ds is perfectly willing to count trucks and balls. Try to sit him down to "teach" him something is out of the question. So, I try to introduce higher concepts without pointing it out tohim. For EX: "Ds, I see 4 red cars ! 2 are in this parking lot, and 2 are in that parking lot! "(Division) Or...."DS! I see one firetruck in the garage, and one out being cleaned!"(Addition or Subtraction)

HTH!!

mp
 

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Not to hijak, but we're currently deciding between Singapore & Shiller Math. Anyone experience Shiller? It appealed to me because it seemed more kinesthetic than Singapore...
 
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