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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anybody know if it's possible to get mastitis *without* first getting a plugged duct? I went to bed with my left breast very tender to the touch but I <b>don't</b> feel the usual bumps under the skin that indicate a plug. DS nursed on it all night but this A.M. it's still very tender and I feel rotten.<br><br>
Insights much appreciated!
 

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The first time I got mastitis (when ds#1 was 6 weeks old), I never noticed a plugged duct. I was fine, then the breast was a little red and tender in the evening (but no bumps), then I woke up in the middle of the night with a fever and mastitis. Of course, I might have missed some signs.<br><br>
Feel better soon!!!! Rest and nurse a lot. Post back if you need any advice if it is mastitis.<br><br>
Becca
 

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I am pretty sure you can have mastitis without having a plugged duct, it can be an infection that started for other reasons. Sometimes when you have damaged skin or tissue around the nipple, bacteria can grow and cause mastitis.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Mastitis during breast-feeding can be caused by:<br><br>
Breast engorgement (swelling)<br>
A blocked milk duct<br>
Cracked or damaged skin or tissue around the nipple<br>
Mastitis most commonly occurs when the breasts are not fully emptied of milk. The milk overflows from the breast glands and engorges the breasts. Breast engorgement (swelling) can occur any time the breasts produce more milk than the amount being removed by breast-feeding, pumping, or manual (hand) expression. Breast engorgement increases the risk of infection. If bacteria enter the breast through an opening in the nipple or a break in the skin, the breast tissue becomes infected.<br><br>
When bacteria enters the breast ducts, it grows and attracts inflammatory cells. Inflammatory cells release substances to fight the infection (mastitis) but also cause the breast tissue to well and increases blood flow. Nasopharyngeal organisms from the infant's mouth, sinuses and other air passages are usually the source of breast infections in breast-feeding women. Though women may be inclined to stop breast-feeding if they have mastitis, continued breast-feeding actually helps to clear the infection. Breast-feeding with mastitis is usually not harmful to the baby.</td>
</tr></table></div>
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
TY both so much for your replies! DS is 8.5 months old and is starting to self-wean - he still nurses a couple of times a day, but not for very long or very enthusiastically and then, at night, he makes up for it by nursing a lot so I'm still producing a lot of milk even if he isn't drinking it during the day. I haven't felt *uncomfortably* engorged so I figured everything was OK, but maybe not. He has also recently cut his top two teeth and has scraped me a few times while unlatching, so I may have some tiny cuts that allowed some germs in.<br><br>
Again, THANK YOU for your replies (<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rocks.jpg" style="border:0px solid;" title="mdc rocks">) - hope you have a happy Thanksgiving. DS is at his grandmother's so I'm gonna go lay down for a while now and hope this passes quickly.
 
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