Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>We bought Horizons math 1 for dd2 to do, figuring that since it was an "accelerated" program that she'd be right there with it since there is material in that level that she hadn't learned yet when we left the k12 school.  Yeah, ummm she's almost done with both workbooks already and has mastered what we've done so far.  What do I do now?  I didn't think when she started the material in early November that she'd be almost done this fast..........  I'm seriously thinking of chucking curriculum and just grabbing a scope and sequence from a curriculum of all the concepts to master before pre-algebra so that I can work at her speed and be sure she's got everything she'll need to go into algebra in a couple years (yes she could be in algebra by 4th grade or sooner if she doesn't slow down, I was doing algebra in 6th grade only because the PS I was in held me back and the teachers I had wouldn't give me harder material until I was in 6th grade and I went to a private school a couple years, then I flew through math, dd2 is more math-minded than I am though and I refuse to hold her back if she's interested and good at it)</p>
<p> </p>
<p>So what curriculums would you suggest I look at to take the scope and sequence from to use as a checklist for covering math with her?  Today we're going to get into carrying and borrowing in 2 or more digit math........... lol  I anticipate that by the end of Jan she'll have mastered her multiplication facts too but I need for my own comfort some kind of list I can check off what we teach her as she masters it so that I know I didn't miss anything with her math.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
<p>What about just printing out the Horizons S&S? It's a pretty traditional, straight-forward curriculum.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Did you use the placement test before buying HM 1? Maybe you just placed her too low. My big girl (also a very accelerated math student) will finish Horizons 1 this month (actually we are about to begin the same material as you) and we also worked in Singapore 1b. Using two programs works very well for us. Maybe that's another thing to consider?</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,681 Posts
<p>Another vote for Singapore. It's inexpensive and well-suited to accelerated students. My 7yo is working in the 5th grade books now and still really enjoying it. It has worked well for my three bright older kids as well.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Miranda</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
<p>The reason we didn't go with Singapore for her was because we had done Singapore with our oldest girl and I absolutely HATED the workbooks.  But then, we only tried earlybird (the 4 workbook set) but we just really didn't like it much at all.  I've still got those workbooks from dd1's time with that program, and I use them as a general guide for math with my 3yo and 4yo dd's when they want to do math, maybe I need to look into Singapore again for dd2.  DD1 is doing great in Miquon orange (2nd grade but working below grade level, since putting her in Miquon she has started to take off) so at least I have that child figured out for a few years.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>DH was the one initially who suggested that I chuck math curricula with dd2 though, he's seen how she's blowing through math right now and how strong my math is (I can go to the store with a huge list and a budget to stay under, and can accurately calculate what I am spending on food and such to within 10 cents including adding tax to taxable items, I've been nicknamed the human calculator from the time I was dd1's age because I could do that even back then but I wasn't quite as accurate as I am now).  I think he's giving my math skills a little too much credit.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
<p>Try the Horizons placement test. Horizons is more advanced...my big girl is doing stuff that the 2nd graders at the local public school are doing this month and in January (they have a math curriculum map posted on their website).</p>
<p> </p>
<p>But if you are looking for "traditional" S&S's you could also check out Abeka, Bob Jones University (BJU) or the Horizons S&S. Those all seem like they take traditional math sequences.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
<p>That's the thing, I did give her the Horizons placement test first. LOL  Her score on math 1 wasn't quite high enough to place her in math 2 (yes she's 6yo and in 1st grade, I'm not mixing up my kids here on this one).  I should have gotten math 2 also when we ordered math 1.................. *sigh*  Oh well, dh said that I can use his Christmas bonus to get math 2 if I insist on continuing with a curriculum for her.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
<p>If you order the books from Rainbow Resource before 12/16, you can get free shipping on orders over $25. I plan on purchazing Horizons 3 before then!</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,627 Posts
<p>My FIL is, without exaggeration, a math genius. I asked him to recommend some math books for me, because I felt that my math education was a little lacking, and I'd like to be stronger in order to teach my kids, and because I'm all of a sudden much more interested in my old age. :lol He got me a book called <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FUnderstanding-Mathematics-Counting-Keith-Kressin%2Fdp%2F0965730018" rel="norewrite" target="_blank">Understanding Mathematics: From Counting to Calculus</a> by Keith Kressin. If what you want is more of a "list" of concepts she needs to know, then this book might be for you. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
<p>I really like RightStart Math for my bright 6 y.o.  They really focus on understanding concepts, introducing very advanced math but in such a way that the child really understands the WHY behind the math they are doing, rather than just performing drill-and-practice.  They have a little survey on their website to evaluate at what level your child should start.  I started my DD in Level B this year even though I know she could have started in C, just because I really wanted her to understand math from the beginning the way RightStart explains it, I felt like that would make math a lot easier for her in the long run.  She's eating up a couple of lessons a day, though, so she will move into Level C part way through the school year. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,466 Posts
<p>We use EPGY Math from Stanford's Gifted program. I love that it tailors to the child's own pace and you pay by time rather than by grade. (DD started at 1/2 way through K level, after she finished her K year. I started it a little low to see how quickly it would track to her level, and because she needed some positive "easy" work after some problems with another program). She started it in Sept. of this year, and it's now moved her up to almost beginning of second grade. You can do a 3 week trial and sign up for $45/3 months at <a href="http://www.education.com/e-learning/stanford-epgy/" target="_blank">http://www.education.com/e-learning/stanford-epgy/</a></p>
<p> </p>
<p>Education.com is marketing it as "supplemental/coaching" for kids in schools, but it's also great for homeschool. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
<p>What we did last year for DS - then 5, now 6 - was to enroll him in EPGY - he went through K in just a few sessions followed by a few weeks to go through 1st grade. After that it slowed down quite a bit and now doing it sporadically he is halfway through 3rd grade (which meshes finally with where he is in k12's math). We also bought Singapore 2b as it covers mental math in depth for the first portion and I thought that would be helpful for him.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>While we didn't use Earlybird I have heard that it is nothing like Primary Mathematics so I would guess it might be worth checking out Singapore again. DS really enjoyed doing the workbook - we just didn't do ALL of the textbook and workbook problems as he obviously got it quickly. Another program that might work (and has free samples) is Math Mammoth. It's similar to Singapore in approach and is quite cheap if you want to just try out one book or level.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,233 Posts
<p>DS is 6.5 and we did k12 for oh bout 2 weeks LOL. I have math U see   and Math mammoth.  I have math mammoth becaue sthey are cheap basic no frills worksheets and I can skip around and go at our own pace. The math u see is great for a hands on type learning.  He has been doing carrying over addition with 2 or 3 digits for a while now, and we are starting multiplication.  If she is an accelerated learning then probably like DS gets she gets concepts quickly and can learn multiple concepts back to back. One thing I like about math mammoth is that it gives you basically a list of things by grade level.  Math is something we get from so many sources here, because DH is a math genius and helps with the applied/creative side of math.  I'm really glad my kids both do well with math because though I did pretty good and made it through calculus,it never made as much sense to me as in applying it everywhere until DH explained things to me. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
<p>I do not like Horizons by midway because it starts having too much repetition and does not learn much new by 3rd or 4th grade, don't recall which. It is just a lot of repetition with what they already know. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>We did Singapore with my older and hated it. We still finished the series but vowed to find something better for the younger children. But then, nothing better really could be found. You might be interested in Galore Press, but I did not want to order those sight unseen. But I have heard good about those from other parents of accelerated children.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Lisa1970</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1284075/math-help-for-accelerated-6yo-needed#post_16109518"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I do not like Horizons by midway because it starts having too much repetition and does not learn much new by 3rd or 4th grade, don't recall which. It is just a lot of repetition with what they already know. </p>
<p> </p>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>I found this to be true with the last 30 lessons of Horizons 1. There are really only one or two new things that are introduced - addition with re-grouping and double digit subtract (which is nothing since the addition was easily understood). So pretty much the rest of Horizons 1 is gravy for us so I'm letting my big girl piddle through it by picking what she wants to work on. We'll tackle the re-grouping after Christmas and start Horizons 2 on January 1st. I find that we compact Horizons quite heavily. But my big girl enjoys working through it and I ordered HM 3 via Rainbow Resources.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,289 Posts
<p>We use and like Singapore. You can add the Intensive Practice book in addition to or instead of the regular workbook for problems that develop problem solving and extend the concepts. We also have their Challenging Word Problems, and I understand there is a new addition of this, to build additional problem-solving practice and to think about more real-world approaches.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,134 Posts
<p>Singapore for the elementary kids is nothing like their earlybird stuff!  Way different.  We use it with both kids.  My oldest (gifted) uses it and life of fred this year.  But, if you want to skip curriculum (or just do your own) you might like the khan academy.  It is free, online videos that cover EVERY math concept I can think up.  So, you can use that as a guide and instuctor. . . then make or download (from math mammoth) worksheets for her to do.  I would also look at keeping a lot of math hands on or real life when possible. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>Amy</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,467 Posts
<p>Bumping up to see if there are any more suggestions ...</p>
<p> </p>
<p>we are using Accelerated Math worksheets/tests sent home by the teacher for my kindergartener.  She loves it and it is a mix of challenging and practicing math fluency with easy questions (simple addition, subtraction).  Perfect for us.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,681 Posts
<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Subhuti</strong> <a href="/community/t/1284075/math-help-for-accelerated-6yo-needed#post_16865104"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><p>Bumping up to see if there are any more suggestions ...</p>
<p> </p>
<p>we are using Accelerated Math worksheets/tests sent home by the teacher for my kindergartener.  She loves it and it is a mix of challenging and practicing math fluency with easy questions (simple addition, subtraction).  Perfect for us.</p>
</div>
</div>
<p> </p>
<p>If your dd is in school that presents some rather different considerations than a homeschooling situation. In your case I would try to avoid promoting acceleration through the standard scope & sequence that school uses, as that will only increase the mismatch. Instead I would focus on enrichment with tangential topics. My youngest did Singapore Primary Math, but that had her finishing pre-algebra at age 8, not a situation that would be well-suited to a child in school!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>You could look for books by Theoni Pappas (eg. "Penrose the Mathematical Cat") and for logic games (chess, Set, Logical Journey of the Zoombinis) instead of curriculum style resources.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Miranda</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
<p>Timez Attack multiplication and division will make sure she has automatic recall and isn't just figuring it out (time challange).</p>
<p> </p>
<p>We use Kumon workbooks -- not the center stuff, just the home workbooks.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>She might like Carmen Sandiego Math Detective.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,943 Posts
<p>My six and eight year olds love Timez Attack....they also have an addition/subtraction beta version (free).</p>
<p> </p>
<p>We've been supplementing with Math Mammoth.  Very affordable, and my son really likes the approach.  We did Right Start A and B, but I never bought C.</p>
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top