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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my first born thinks like me, and it's a breeze to chat and help him with things when he asks. But when DD approaches those ages and asks those same qeustions, my explanations don't work. So I need diff ones please. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
Numbers places, value. That the first digit means 1's, the second digit means 10's, etc . . that you can ignore the extra zeros in 100 +100 and just add up the ones, because the ones mean the number of hundreds.<br><br>
this is my way, and it does not work. How could you explain this concept differently?<br><br>
Ditto for money, as this all ties in.<br><br>
Many many thanks.
 

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Amazingly enough I didn't understand this well until I learned binary numbers. Numbers can be written in any "base" with each column representing a power of the base number. Since we use a "base 10" system have you thought about laying it out in a column chart like this:<br><br><br>
(10 to the second power), (10 to the first power), (10 to the zero power)<br><br><br>
--------------------------<br>
100 10 1<br>
---------------------------<br><br>
4 = 0 0 4 (no hundreds or tens, but 4 ones)<br>
13 = 0 1 3 (no hundreds, 1 ten, plus 3 ones)<br><br>
etc, etc.<br><br><br>
For binary numbers (base 2) it looks like this:<br><br>
-------------------------------------<br>
16 8 4 2 1<br>
--------------------------------------<br>
4 = 0 0 1 0 0 (100)<br>
13= 0 1 1 0 1 (1101)<br><br>
It's basically the same thing you said but laying it all out in a chart might help.<br><br>
I don't know how old your daughter is, but I was taught that numbers could be in different bases in 5th grade and playing around with it really made the whole thing click, even though I had no problem with math before.<br><br>
Sorry about the poor formatting, hopefully you get the concept.
 

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If she is just asking you "what is 100+100?," you could give her the answer without the explanation and let her work it out. It's something my ds was pleased to figure out for himself over the summer (almost 8). He thinks he figured out a cool trick. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I'm not averse to explaining things to him but he isn't always receptive, so I don't unless he seems to be asking for it.<br><br>
So is she just asking you what something adds up to or is she actually asking you how to add things up? If it is the latter, maybe you could use manipulatives. Even just pony beads strung on pipe cleaners or something. Show her 4 pipe cleaners each with 10 beads is the same as 40 beads.<br><br>
How old is she again?
 

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I must think like your daughter, because I read your explanation and had no idea what you were talking about! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I like RoundAbout's explanation with different bases.
 

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If she does skip counting, you could say it's like skip counting by 10s or 100s. I asked my ds the other night if he knew what it meant to skip count or count by 2's. He said sure it's like saying one, TWO, three, FOUR, five, SIX. He understands the concept although he doesn't have counting that way memorized.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Too funny, I can just sort of get the gist of Roundabout's explanation, but not really. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
She's 6. It's not because I'm teaching her anything, but she loves to do oral math talk, in the car, on hikes. The farmer has 4 cows in his field, how many legs? That sort of thing. And she's fine at it. But then we started playing monopoly (her broher's been playing for a year or so), and loves it, but is frustrated that she cannot count up her money or do her own math on it, b/c it's mostly double or triple digits.<br><br>
She wants to learn it, whether she's ready or not, so to me, if I found the right way of explaning it, she could get it, or get a bit of a grasp at least.
 

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what about counting rods. especially the ones that have tens sticks and hundreds blocks. Those might be helpful. Oh and maybe an abacus.<br><br>
eta link<br><a href="http://www.homeschoolingsupply.com/ideal-school-supply/math-manipulatives-id-7579.htm" target="_blank">http://www.homeschoolingsupply.com/i...es-id-7579.htm</a><br>
they are called base ten blocks
 

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Give her a calculator? My ds always loved the oral math, too. He got the gist of place values from playing computer games where he needed points to buy weapons but it seemed to really make sense when he was closer to age 8.
 

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I made bundles of popsicle sticks for my daughter. I tied stacks of 10 of them together and labeled them '10' and left 9 loose and labeled them '1.' We write 2-digit numbers by drawing a line down the page and grouping a pile of '10's on the left and a pile of '1's on the right, then recording how many '10's we have in the left column and how many '1's on the right. 2 '10's and 5 '1's makes 2|5, 25.<br><br>
We use the same kind of set up to add them, although she's not adding much at this point.<br><br>
Maybe too simple for you, but a potential beginning.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>4evermom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14677733"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">If she is just asking you "what is 100+100?," you could give her the answer without the explanation and let her work it out. It's something my ds was pleased to figure out for himself over the summer (almost 8). He thinks he figured out a cool trick. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I like this answer - the one about base numbers and powers gave me a lunp in my throat and had me reconsidering homeschooling!
 
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