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Just to give you an idea of where DD is, she recently had IQ testing done (yes, despite all of its flaws! -- I know!). She is around 140.

So...she is convinced that she hates math. I believe that it's because she has never really had any type of math challenge at school. We do a lot of puzzle-type math at home, but she doesn't associate that with "math" like she does at school.

So we're supposed to have a meeting with her teacher to determine the best option for her. I would like to have her do some more in-depth math projects, so I'm looking for ideas on what she could do. We're thinking of some sort of data analysis type of project, but I'm open to other ideas. She's also gifted in visual arts, and we would love to combine ideas if we can.
 

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Geometric constructions with compass and straight-edge, making and colouring mandalas, experimenting with arcs and segments and/or using guidance to create regular polygons without graduated rulers or protractors ... very fun!

Probability and combinatorics exercises. With two dice, how likely is one to roll a 3? A 7? Why the difference? What's the math behind it? What are the odds behind poker hands? How many distinct handshakes can take place between 4 people? 5? 6? What's the math behind it?

Hands-on Equations from Borenson.com is a great introduction to linear algebra and negative numbers for third-graders. It's like a board-game with rules for "legal moves" that help kids internalize the principles of algebraic problem-solving.

Knitting, origami, exploring Fibonacci series and Pascal's triangle. Eratosthenes' sieve. Scientific notation and exponents. Fractals. Mobius strips. Rules of divisibility. Codes and cyphers.

Great books about math: "The Man Who Counted" by M. Tahan. Various books by Theoni Pappas, including "Googols, Fractals and Other Mathematical Tales" and "Penrose the Mathematical Cat." "The Number Devil" by H. Enzenberger.

Hope that gives you some ideas. My kids are pretty quick with math. They were enjoying most of this stuff between KG and 3rd grade (though compass and straight-edge we didn't try until 4th, I think).

Miranda
 
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