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DD really doesn't like math. She gets really frustrated by it and then stops trying altogether. We have been doing worksheets with her and she just really hates them. So, we have to find a different way. She is in first grade, and is doing basic addition and subtraction. I think I really need a curriculum of some sort to teach math, because I need help explaining concepts in a way she can comprehend. Can anyone reccomend a good, fun curriculum, or even just a fun, laid back eay to teach math? Thanks.
 

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We have been very happy with a combination of Miquon (manipulative based) and Singapore (not) for our kids. Generally we start with Miquon, which is 'looser' and more playful and discovery-based, and move to Singapore when they're craving something more systematic and tidier. They've all gained an excellent conceptual grounding in math. <a href="http://www.sonlight.com" target="_blank">http://www.sonlight.com</a> has good explanations of these two programs, including their strengths and weaknesses.<br><br>
We use the curricula very loosely... only when they feel like doing some math. Sometimes that means weeks or months when one child won't touch math. That's okay because they don't end up hating it, and when they come back they almost always spurt ahead like crazy. We also play lots of games... board games, dice games, card games, mental games. "Family Math" and "Box Cars and One-Eyed Jacks" are two books often recommended for their collections of math activities and games.<br><br>
A lot of our math comes in the form of real life: saving and spending allowance, managing a small kid-business (laying hens), hobbies like quilting, weaving, knitting & woodworking, and cooking and baking.<br><br>
Edited to add that my very precocious eldest (who is doing a high school math program at age 10) didn't even start any formal math work until after her sixth birthday. My son was about the same age when he started. So there's certainly no rush. When kids are really ready for symbolic math concepts and execution, it comes quickly and easily.<br><br>
Miranda<br><br>
Homeschooling mom to Erin (10, Singapore NMC 1), Noah (8, Singapore PM 3B), Sophie (6, Singapore PM 2A & Miquon Green Book) and Fiona (22 months, who can count three objects!)
 

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We used Singapore last year and then dumped it because it was causing my older Dd to hate math. This year we are doing a combo of Miquon (not every day or even every week) and Family Math (I highly recommend this book), living math books from the livingmath.com web site, and just finding the math in our everyday lives. Trust the Children has some nice math activities in it, too.<br><br>
Miquon is nice in that it is all hands on and makes sense to my kids. There isn't an awful lot on each page so they don't get mired down, and since the books are color coded rather than grade level it is MUCH easier to just let them be where they are rather than worrying about what grade level they are working. I don't believe in grade levels, but it is hard for me to ignore them when they are written on the books. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Family Math by Stenmark is a just an awsome resource of math activities, games, and experiences. It covers a wide rage of abilites (from k through about middle school) on an amazing range of math topics. We just got this out of the library 2 weeks ago and we will buy a copy for ourselves when we have to take it back. My kids are really enjoying the things we are doing from this book.<br><br>
I recently read Math: Facing an American Phobia by Burns. This is a quick read (i.e., just get it from the library, don't buy it). It really helped me understand how and why to use real life to teach math. I know that sounds silly, but I needed to read about it. :LOL<br><br>
Trust the Children: An Activity Guide for Homeschooling and Alternative Learning by Kealoha has some super and very easy to use games, but only one chapter is about math. If you need lots of ideas for lots of different subjects, then this is your book. It's 270 pages long, and about 50 pages are about math.<br><br>
Check out the livingmath.com web site. It has lots of cool ideas and resources.<br><br>
We may use Singapore again some day. There were a lot of things I really liked about it. It just wasn't the right choice for my Dds for now.
 

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I did Miquon with my son. He loved it. We have now moved to Saxon for this year.<br><br>
I bought Math-U-See for my dd (5 at the time) and she hated it. We went to a homescholing store and I let her choice the programs. She choose Rod and Staff because she like the duck. I don't like this program as well as the other but it fits her mind and you can see that she is learning.
 

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I cannot recommend <a href="http://www.alabacus.com/" target="_blank">Right Start</a> too highly. DD is greatly enjoying Level B (it's Grade 1, there's no need to do level A). It's parent intensive, and not one of the cheaper choices, but it's the only math curriculum I evaluated that DH and myself actually got excited about. I love the way it emphasizes total understanding of current material while sneaking in the underpinnings for concepts just around the corner. There are no colorful worksheets; instead it uses games for the memorization of facts rather than endless drill. I'd recommend getting the games book and cards no matter what math program you choose.
 

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<a href="http://www.monroe.lib.in.us/childrens/mathbib.html" target="_blank">Making Math Fun</a><br><a href="http://www.k111.k12.il.us/king/math.htm#Math" target="_blank">Online Math Activities</a> <a href="http://www.livingmath.net/Library.html" target="_blank">Living Math</a> <a href="http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Tower/1217/math1.html" target="_blank">First Grade Math</a><br>
I have a 1st grader and we just focus on one subject a month. We use the links above to help us out. This month we are learning about telling time.
 

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i'm teaching dd her math by using games(chicken feet, number bingo, sequencing and number sentence puzzles), abacus, actual clocks, money, making up stories, stickers, calenders, chores, jumpstart/reader rabbit puter cd's. we have workbooks/worksheets ect, but don't spend more than 20 min. or if she gets tired/frustrated with it before then on them. MOst of the time I have her tools available and if she wants to work in a workbook, she gets it out herself and works on it until she's tired of it. she has the choice of what she wants to do when she wants to do it regarding her education right now. most of the time it's playing a game ( fine by me, it's fun and practical all at once for all of us). she likes to tell me the time so she is practicing learning to read a clock by actually doing it. she likes to keep track of the days so she reads the calender daily, and is counting down until Christmas on her own as well. we are starting to learn about money, so we play "store" and she gives the bell ringer money after she identifies what i give her to put in the bucket. she is at the pont she is adding in her head and is starting to subtract. living provides all sorts of math applications, it's just simplifying it and making it fun. making it a chore doesn't allow for retention and can turn the person against it.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>NoHiddenFees</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I cannot recommend <a href="http://www.alabacus.com/" target="_blank">Right Start</a> too highly.</div>
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I second everything she said. I am using level A though, but agree that you can skip it. DD's doing Kindergarten curriculum and DS loves to play along. They both love "math days". I like that it's non-consumable, I'm big into hand-me-downs whether I'm getting or giving or just trickling down between my own. The sad fact that I'm 30 and this curriculum is making math make sense to me for the first time is also significant to my choice. Math was never a strong subject for me.<br><br>
We also watch School House Rock's- Multiplication Rock off of a DVD. I'm not teaching multiplication yet, but it adds to the over all sense that math is fun when we find ourselves singing about numbers throughout the day. "My Hero Zero" There's a song for the numbers 2-12 and 0, but not for 1. But since this is silliness more than education we used the Aimee Mann cover of the Harry Nilsson song One- "One is the loneliest number" the week we focused on 1. We're doing Oak Meadow as a framework so we're doing one number at a time as per the curriculum, but doing it with Right Start for a deeper understanding.<br><br>
So far so good.<br><br>
Thanks,<br>
Crystal
 

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My daughter DID NOT enjoy Miquon Math, even though I thought it was really cool. It was too puzzling, she didn't want to need my help, and the material just didn't have that step-by-step quality she likes now with Saxon. But she's ten and we just started Saxon, so we didn't use theier primary curriculum.<br><br>
She acted like your dd before with math, but now has a more positive attitude.<br><br>
I remember when she was little like that, we would do playful things. She's very artistic, so I would send her outside to draw pictures of flowers and then count them and right out addition facts with different kinds. And I would have her search around for things to measure with a tape measure and we would write down the nimbers and draw pictures of things we had measured. And she would sort and categorize toys and we would write out the collected information. Later on we would make graphs.<br><br>
I have twin 5yos. They love numbers and like to do oral math facts and chant-count. But they ABSOLUTELY don't get doing any on paper, and they never do. They like to play with Cuisenaire rods and fraction circles. They like learning about the clock. This is almost 100% self-directed, not because I decided to be that way, but because there's no point in interfering with what they're doing. (They aren't kindergarten yet, either.)<br><br>
With my first daughter, I wanted to do too much. With them it is easier to relax and watch them learn. But I didn't even buy dd1 a curriculum for math until she was seven. Just some casual worksheets and made-up activities.
 

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for kids that are not enjoying math using traditional curriculum i would go back to the very beginning to start over slower- shapes and simple counting/sorting exercises<br>
repetitive adding games board game and card games are wonderful and we did montessori works<br>
another thing to spark some kid's interests is using real money<br>
one of my younger boys did not get into wanting to learn adding till he was having his own toy sale (garage sale table) he then understood what he wanted to make $$ to buy something new and had to figure out pricing things and making change etc.. really got him wanting to learn math
 

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IMO and experience, math is just one of those subjects in which the curriculum or materials really need to fit the parent and child for the optimum homeschooling situation.<br><br>
I agree with Vanna's Mom that you can go back to the very basics at this point. The time spent on building those concepts hands-on will serve her very well in the future. I go very s-l-o-w-l-y through the basics with my kids, and then the more complicated stuff comes more easily later on.<br><br>
As far as curriculum goes: My son hated traditional school sources: Math Steps, HBJ Math Unlimited. My daughter liked them. Saxon was painful for my son. He *loved* Miquon through the green book, then hated the yellow book. My daughter hated Miquon from the start, so we never pursued it with her. We've found that both kids thrive with Singapore, so we're going with that. I'm adding in other resources as necessary - especially for learning times tables/division facts, etc. with my son.<br><br>
Both kids have also really liked Family Math (see Linda KS' post above for info), and the Marilyn Burns books: I Hate Mathematics, and Math For Smarty Pants. The last two are a bit beyond 1st grader's comprehension, but Family Math is fantastic, and fun. You can use it as a stand-alone curriculum, or in conjunction with any other curriculum you have.<br><br>
Laura :)
 

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Games! Board games and card games and any other games! Don't forget computer games too. My son learned counting, adding, and subracting in this way and he also learned multiplying, and division through games.<br><br>
One game we use to play was with raisins. We would go back and worth giving each other problems. I would say something like this. Count out seven raisins. Now eat two. How many are left? Then it would be his turn to give me a problem. He loved this game.<br><br>
We play multiplication war, but you can play addition or subtraction war just as easily. Play war like you normally would but whoever has the highest number adds or subtracts and takes the cards. We made all face cards equal 10 but you can do this however you like.
 

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I don't have any suggestions for cirriculum itself but have you tried some of the online math game sites?They are a lot of fun and they really learn alot.My son really struggles in math and we did this for a long time to get him having fun with math again.Just pop math game sites in your search engine and have fun!!! Love Mylie xx <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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my friend uses Making Math Meaningful and really loves it. I don't think there is a lot of writing and I don't belive there is any workbooks involved (I am a load of information aren't I) But it is worth a search.<br><br>
We use Miquon and like the way it can be tailored. You can use the work books as guides or as the core of the cirriculum. They can work alone or with you as much or as little as they need. they also have some very fresh ways od approaching some subjects. I just wish they gave me more tips on how to approach somehting.
 

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Dd hated Miquon, thought she was awful at math with it. She liked Singapore for awhile, but started to get burned out on it before long. Then we discovered RIGHTSTART <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/partytime.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="partytime"> Hurray! We've used it for 2 years now, and still going strong.<br><br>
After much reflection, I realized that one of the main problems was that I didn't really have an intuitive grasp of how to teach math in a way that made sense to her. I have an intuitive grasp of math -- very rightbrained. Dd is much more leftbrained. RightStart has taught me how to teach math. It was interesting to read <span style="text-decoration:underline;">The Learning Gap: Why Our Schools Are Failing....</span> and realize that many of the concepts discussed in the book are already imbedded in RightStart.
 
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