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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I love lurking here, though I wouldn't consider myself TF. I think the sauerkraut is holding me back <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> .<br><br>
Anyhow, I think I have seen kerrygold cheese mentioned several times in this forum, and I was wondering if you could tell me why you like it. Or just spam me your thoughts on cheese in general. I'm trying to figure out what supermarket cheese is the most acceptable. Sadly, there's no Wholefoods type store around, although there is a gourmet store that has a pretty good cheese selection.<br><br>
Thanks! I knew I could trust you not to tell me to just stop eating cheese!
 

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Hi! I'm not exactly sure about Kerrygold, but I think Tillamook cheese is popular with some because they don't use the rBGH on their cows. The Tillamook brand is pretty widespread in supermarkets (they sell big blocks of it at Costco...a good deal) I am also interested in what others have to say! Yay cheese! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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i love tillamook...they don't use rennet in the production of their cheese, so it's completely vegetarian.<br><br>
nice creamy taste, as well.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/loveeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Loveeyes">: I love saurkraut <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> It actually tastes a heap nicer if you make your own.<br><br>
Kerrygold dairy products are grassfed which is why they are popular. They come from Ireland I think? With cheese, I always get locally produced cheeses ( less food miles ) Fortunately for me we have some real good cheese makers nearby & all our cattle are grassfed & don't get those rgbh hormones.<br><br>
One thing with vegetarian rennet is it is actually a fungus extract so I do try to avoid it if I can.
 

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Kerrygold is awesome and super yummy. They make a great aged cheddar and and good milder cheddar called Blarney.<br><br>
I know lots about cheese (used to work in a cheese shop)-what do you want to know?<br><br>
I do know that European imported cheeses are of great quality. No hormones grass fed cows. They have very strict standards. Anything that is labeled as AOC (appelation d'origine controlee) which means "terms of controlled origin" is held up to the highest standards. For instance a true Brie will be stamped AOC because a true Brie has to have certain qualifications. Down to the time of day when the cow is milked.<br><br>
MMmmm, now I want cheese....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everybody! I will check for Tillamook and Kerrygold the next time I go to the... uggh...grocerystore.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>OceanMomma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9040423"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">With cheese, I always get locally produced cheeses ( less food miles ).</div>
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We do have some local cheese producers, yay, but my dh loves a good ole' fashioned cheddar. OT, but I've been seriously ramping up my own local eating this year, and I feel like I've been driving all over creation to keep my food miles down! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Earthy Mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9040480"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><br>
I know lots about cheese (used to work in a cheese shop)-what do you want to know?<br><br>
I do know that European imported cheeses are of great quality. No hormones grass fed cows. They have very strict standards. Anything that is labeled as AOC (appelation d'origine controlee) which means "terms of controlled origin" is held up to the highest standards. For instance a true Brie will be stamped AOC because a true Brie has to have certain qualifications. Down to the time of day when the cow is milked.</div>
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Ooh...what a delicious job. I guess my question is sort of...undefined. I think EU cheeses don't have hormones, but I wasn't sure whether the AOC label covered farming conditions or feed. So basically my question was what kind of cheese do you buy at the grocery store and why?<br><br>
Thanks again!<br><br>
ETA: Also, if an EU cheese is not labeled AOC, does it meet EU standards even if it is made for export?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>OceanMomma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9040423"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/loveeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Loveeyes">: I love saurkraut <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> It actually tastes a heap nicer if you make your own.<br><br>
Kerrygold dairy products are grassfed which is why they are popular. They come from Ireland I think? With cheese, I always get locally produced cheeses ( less food miles ) Fortunately for me we have some real good cheese makers nearby & all our cattle are grassfed & don't get those rgbh hormones.<br><br>
One thing with vegetarian rennet is it is actually a fungus extract so I do try to avoid it if I can.</div>
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my understanding is that it's microbial...<br><br>
serious question: do you also avoid mushrooms and such? and if so...what's the reasoning on skipping fungi?<br><br><br><br>
horizon organic makes some tasty cheeses, as well...and they seem to take decent care of their animals...no hormones, no antibiotics, and they are allowed to produce milk according to their natural cycle.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>esylvia</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9040497"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thanks everybody! I will check for Tillamook and Kerrygold the next time I go to the... uggh...grocerystore.<br><br><br><br>
We do have some local cheese producers, yay, but my dh loves a good ole' fashioned cheddar. OT, but I've been seriously ramping up my own local eating this year, and I feel like I've been driving all over creation to keep my food miles down! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br><br><br>
Ooh...what a delicious job. I guess my question is sort of...undefined. I think EU cheeses don't have hormones, but I wasn't sure whether the AOC label covered farming conditions or feed. So basically my question was what kind of cheese do you buy at the grocery store and why?<br><br>
Thanks again!<br><br>
ETA: Also, if an EU cheese is not labeled AOC, does it meet EU standards even if it is made for export?</div>
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Yes, they still meet standards- the AOC means that for a cheese to be named Brie, Roquefort, Beaufort, Muenster, Bleu D'auvergne, etc. SPECIFIC names, they have to follow the original process for making that particular cheese dating back to the origins of the cheese.<br><br>
Ex. Roquefort is the original blue cheese. It was made by accident by storing the cheese in caves and also storing breads in the same caves. The mold spores from the bread infected the cheese and tada, we have blue cheese. True Roquefort is made in the same caves, using the same type of bread mold spores.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>loriforeman</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9040564"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">horizon organic makes some tasty cheeses, as well...and they seem to take decent care of their animals...no hormones, no antibiotics, and they are allowed to produce milk according to their natural cycle.</div>
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We skip horizon because they really aren't very good to their animals or good to the environment by comparison to other dairies. <a href="http://cornucopia.org/dairysurvey/FarmID_134.html" target="_blank">They scored very poorly on the Cornucopia Institute report card</a>.<br><br>
When we can, we purchase raw, but aged, artisan cheese from grass-fed cows directly from a cheesemaker in our state. When that's not possible, we will opt for Organic Valley raw cheeses or the Kerrygold cheeses.
 

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How do you guys afford this cheese?? I saw some raw cheese at our grocery store and it was like 5.99 for this little square package that would have been enough for all five of us on our lunch sandwiches. I just can't do that!<br><br>
Even the regular store brand cheese is almost more than we can afford.<br><br>
I wish it wasn't so expensive to eat healthy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Kimmiepie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9041968"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">How do you guys afford this cheese??</div>
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<br>
We eat very little of it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">
 

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I avoid mushrooms & fungi in general as dh claims to be "allergic" to mushrooms. I don't think he is myself but none of the kids like them either. More importantly for my reasons, my middle dd has/had yeast related excema so I found anything fungal or mushroom-like used to aggravate it.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>loriforeman</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9039773"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">i love tillamook...they don't use rennet in the production of their cheese, so it's completely vegetarian.<br><br>
nice creamy taste, as well.</div>
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The funny thing about rennet/non animal coagulant that i learned as cheesemaker's apprentice on a small organic grassfed goat dairy is:<br><br>
When someone is really concerned about what type of rennet you use, you might point out that the whole concept of dairying is going to leave you with a lot of little male kids or calves that you will not raise to frolic in your barns and eat your pasture if you want to stay solvent. In order to keep your ewes, does, cows lactating, they have to be pregnant quite regularly. And they have both useful future milkers and not so important non-stud quality boys in relatively equal measure, sometimes more than half. So on a tiny goat dairy (30 milkers) you could easily have 50 kids every spring, and 25 are boys and they are going to be meat! It's sad but very very true that dairying is part and parcel coevolved with eating the flesh of most of the males.<br><br>
I guess I'm trying to say 'honor the rennet' <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> it's totally old skool TF.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Kimmiepie</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9041968"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">How do you guys afford this cheese??</div>
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I agree good cheese is ridiculously expensive.<br>
There is a way, though it would be difficult, but very fun. Artisanal cheese making is very popular these days, everybody's trying it, and i'm sure if you look around you will find a couple amateur cheesemakers within an hour from you. They are probably not making cheese in a state inspected facility. They are probably willing to trade some for some of your crafts/baked goods/veggies/whatnot. I know a lady who's doing this, trading for berries and all sorts of things. Of course you could always try to make a basic cheese yourself! It takes some experimenting to get the nice aged ones though.
 

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mmmmm I love the Kerrygold Dubliner! Just love the flavor, like that I can easily find it and it is from grassfed cows. If you have a Trader Joe's they carry it for a great price.<br><br>
I also buy local cheeses when I can afford to -- there's a woman at our farmer's market with some raw gouda! Good too. She has many other cheeses, but that's the only raw.<br><br>
We eat a lot of cheese here. DD needs the fat!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>khalilsmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9049784"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I guess I'm trying to say 'honor the rennet' <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"> it's totally old skool TF.</div>
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"Honor the Rennet" - I love it! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I'm actually working on making my own cheese, but I can't try cheddar until my cellar cools down a bit <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">.
 

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Kerrygold is not raw, but it's grassfed. The Kerrygold cheese and butter are both rated very highly in the WAPF buying guide.<br><br>
My local Costco carries the Kerrygold Dubliner's cheese. It's about $8.5 for a giant block (something like $4.99/lb). We buy 3 blocks at a time and it lasts very well.<br><br>
Other than Kerrygold, I get my cheeses raw from local farmers.
 
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