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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
... as this girl may have been saved. :crying:

“This has put the spotlight on how the internet age and the availability of information can challenge the way we respond to patients who may be very well informed, but can remain frightened and vulnerable.”
No sh*t, Sherlock!

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articl...ptoms-doctors-ignored-her-now-she-s-dead.html

As the Good Book says,

Job 13:4 " But ye are forgers of lies, ye are all PHYSICIANS of no value."
- King James Bible "Authorized Version
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
University of Google

Maybe medical doctors should go there for re-training, then maybe Bronte would be alive. She is the one who warned them.

In response to the case, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust admits that they did not “listen with sufficient attention” to her concerns. Deputy Medical Director Keith Girling said, “This has put the spotlight on how the internet age and the availability of information can challenge the way we respond to patients who may be very well informed, but can remain frightened and vulnerable.”
No sh*t, Sherlock!

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articl...ptoms-doctors-ignored-her-now-she-s-dead.html

As the Good Book says,

Job 13:4 " But ye are forgers of lies, ye are all PHYSICIANS of no value.
- King James Bible "Authorized Version"
 
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Off-topic: Has anyone done studies on sexism in medicine? I've heard anecdotally that men with chest pain get taken more seriously than women. Women often get dismissed as having anxiety, hypochondria, etc.

Slightly more on topic: I wonder how much of this parallels the experience in reporting vaccine reactions.
 

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Off-topic: Has anyone done studies on sexism in medicine? I've heard anecdotally that men with chest pain get taken more seriously than women. Women often get dismissed as having anxiety, hypochondria, etc.

Slightly more on topic: I wonder how much of this parallels the experience in reporting vaccine reactions.
I used to force my husband to go with me whenever we were going to be noncompliant for either a well baby appointment or a prenatal appointment because when he is there they don't ask question or try to convince us to change. Whereas whenever I am alone they try a lot harder to dismiss my concerns and to convince me otherwise. It sucks. It's usually women too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nemi27, I always advise women to bring their husbands and/or large, hairy male friends, who wear leather, have lots of tattooes, and carry chains and pocket knives to their visits. Dr Mendelsohn told the story of the time one of his patients was the King of the Gypsies of Chicago and the entire tribe was in the hallways and not one nurse was bold enough to tell them to leave. (I hope that was not too un-PC)

I should note that there is a trauma care center near me that does not allow anyone in the ER with the patient, so look out for that kind of interference. Choose your urgent care or caretaker wisely when you can.

When my husband was being treated for cancer, I went with him as often as I could. The HIPAA law is a b*tch to deal with, and is the brainchild of Hilary-care from the early 1990s.
 

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When my husband was being treated for cancer, I went with him as often as I could. The HIPAA law is a b*tch to deal with, and is the brainchild of Hilary-care from the early 1990s.
HIPAA is a very, very misunderstood law. I learned in a professional development workshop that it actually expanded, not contracted, the circle of who gets access to patient data. It made it harder for the loved ones of patients to get data, but easier for a lot of other parties.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
HIPAA ... made it harder for the loved ones of patients to get data, but easier for a lot of other parties.
Could I access my own information? What if the information is wrong? Whenever I read or hear about things like HIPAA, I often wonder how hard it is to get wrong information off of a record and put the correct information on.

For example, 35 yrs ago I worked at a place that transposed two numbers in my SS# and screwed my record royally for all time immemorial. Each time I got my paycheck, I reminded them that the SS# was wrong, and they got mad at me and told me I must have done it myself. I did not. My SS# was my ID number in college so I knew my SS# pretty well - the odds are that the HR department f*cked up, but they blamed me.

The end of the story is that they found a reason to let me go - I was pregnant and there was no position suitable a pregnant woman. I filed a EEOC complaint and won, but who wants to work at a place that abused you that much? The SS# file has never been straightened out despite filing many corrections, reports, and complaints to the IRS and SSA. Ladies and gentlemen, your tax $ at work.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My own sister looked at her own file once and noticed that her insurance had been billed for an outpatient surgical procedure that she never had and the lab report and result was lying in her file. She told the nurse, and then the doctor that that was NOT her that it was someone else's, and they seemed confused, but my sister does not know what happened to that file. The doctor has retired, died, and she does not know if it will affect her or not.

How often does that happen?

What can one do?
 

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Could I access my own information? What if the information is wrong? Whenever I read or hear about things like HIPAA, I often wonder how hard it is to get wrong information off of a record and put the correct information on.

For example, 35 yrs ago I worked at a place that transposed two numbers in my SS# and screwed my record royally for all time immemorial. Each time I got my paycheck, I reminded them that the SS# was wrong, and they got mad at me and told me I must have done it myself. I did not. My SS# was my ID number in college so I knew my SS# pretty well - the odds are that the HR department f*cked up, but they blamed me.

The end of the story is that they found a reason to let me go - I was pregnant and there was no position suitable a pregnant woman. I filed a EEOC complaint and won, but who wants to work at a place that abused you that much? The SS# file has never been straightened out despite filing many corrections, reports, and complaints to the IRS and SSA. Ladies and gentlemen, your tax $ at work.
Horrible! That sucks.
 

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I recall getting my medical files years ago,and being shocked at the detail. It was almost as if conversations had been recorded,and written in the files word for word.

I have the kids medical files and school files.I do not have any records,so it is nice to provide this for them.

Doctors have made mistakes but it was silly things missed that I will not mention out of embarassment for the doctor, and my own inability to speak up at the time. I knew. Doctor dismissed. We treated on our own.

I no longer give blanket permission for medical care when the kids are in the care of others. I am close enough to participate in healthcare decisions,but it would seem that doctors NEVER want input.Heck,sometimes they resent input from other HCWs.You are listed as "difficult" or "argumentive" if you say anything.

It is quite honestly an unpleasant situation when having to deal with doctors.Bad enough you need to see them due to illness,and then you have to pray they treat you properly and maybe even with respect if you are lucky.It often takes a death to cause others to change,but sadly the change is often limited in duration and scope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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I have had similar experiences from some doctors. I remember coming in with wrist pain a few months after a ski accident. He tried to tell me it was in my head and offered me pain killers. Not one desire to run an xray or anything. I also complained I gained 10 lbs in a month with no diet/exercise changes. He also tried to dismiss that and tried to get me to see a nutritionist. I found out later that starting the pill can cause weight gain and had started a new type shortly before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have had similar experiences from some doctors. I remember coming in with wrist pain a few months after a ski accident. He tried to tell me it was in my head and offered me pain killers. Not one desire to run an xray or anything.
Hope your wrist is better. Sometimes those bone and soft tissue injuries take a while to localize and show up - that is just the way they are. I was in an automobile accident in January, and my right shoulder started to bother me two weeks later, and I was never sure if it was from the automobile accident or not - it has been five months now, and it still hurts. Whenever I have broken a bone, the real pain does not set in for about four days, and I am sleepy before that.

The BCP causes all kinds of havoc with a woman's body.
 
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