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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Nothing like baring your soul to strangers, huh? But, I gotta ask, and I think this is a better place than the ob's office.

Ever since I got preg, my nipples have disapeared. They've always been "shy" (as my dh says) but now they're gone. (They won't even stick out when I'm cold or w/ ice-yes, don't laugh, I tried!
) I've tried to do the rolling thing mentioned in my bfing book, but hasn't done any good (been doing it for a little over 6 weeks now).

So now I'm concerned that baby won't be able to nurse properly. And I do not want to feed formula under any circumstances.

Sorry if it's way TMI-but I need help!! (probably more than I can get here, but, well, you know...
)

TIA-
 

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Sounds like you have flat nipples that invert since you have gotten more fullness to your breasts. Mine were the same way.
An LC would be your best bet. If you truly do have inverted or flat nipples there are things you can do to help bring them out again while you are still pregnant. Because once you get engorged after birth it's even harder to bring them out.

I ended up not being able to bf but there were many, many factors and the nipples were probably the least one. I'm sure you'll be able to nurse but it will take the guidance of a good LC. I would, again, go to one now. And keep her number handy and have her come to you shortly after the birth to get things started right. Good luck!
 

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Hi Tia, yes it sound slike you have flat nipples and so do I ! I think seeing an LC prior to the birth and attending LLL is a great idea. There are things you need to be aware of nurse with flat nipples. positioning is soooo important and you need to be meticulous EVERY time. The baby has no room to "roll away" or down the breast and can cause pain and if this is repeated nipple trauma or injury. (That was me!) I found the cross cradle hold to be the only position i could nurse in and I LOVED the My Breast Friend Pillow. It was the only thing I could get us in an ideal position with. I also have large breasts and had to use a C hold and do the nipple sandwhich technique to get as much tissue into the babies mouth as possible. (an LC or LLL leader can help you) My baby had troule latching on b/c there was no nipple to "brush againt or tickle the baby;s lips with" as so many books advise. I also rolled up a cloth dipe (a towel would work too) and tucked it under my breast for support and neeed one under the baby's head to get the right height. It was all worth it - definately a learning curve at the begining - but YOU CAN DO THIS! Baby's don;t care if nipples are long or flat or breasts are big or small. Also as a side note I still don;t have "long nipples" They aren't so flat anymore - more like little buttons - but clearly not protruding big nipples. Good luck - HTH Erika
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So next question, and it may be a dumb one-but how do I go about finding an LC? I looked in the phone book and nothing local-there's one about 2 hours away though. Would the L&D ward at the local hospital know? (I'd like to avoid going there if possible-but may not have a choice. No point cutting off my nose to spite my face!)

Thank you so much for the help!
 

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Call your local La Leche League and they can give you the names and numbers of LC's in your area who are certified.
Hospital LC's are not as good (in my experience) as certified IBCLC's. I think LLL only recommends IBCLC's. A lot of hospital LC's are nurses who have taken a few bfing classes and they can only work within the hospitals after you give birth.
 

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Welcome Laurel!
Another one here with a similar situation. I didn't see an LC until after the birth and ended up having to use nipple shields for a while to give the baby something to latch onto. This wasn't a route any professional would recommend, if you can see someone beforehand, but I just wanted to say that it worked out FINE, and that my baby is fat and healthy and no longer uses the shields, and my nipples did get pulled out somewhat but are still fairly flat. It didn't mean in any way that I couldn't nurse, and it in no way effected my supply. So good for you for planning ahead, but don't worry that you won't be able to nurse, because you will.
 

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Hiya, just one inverted nipple here, but for me it was a blessing actually! My DD had oral rejection, or something like that (caused by to much sucking w/ that blue bulb thing at birth, they think). So it hurt like crazy to nurse on the non-inverted because she was crushing it against the roof of her mouth, and it caused cracking. My inverted didn't go that far into her mouth so wasn't damaged, but breaking those adhesions in there hurt like crazy! But at least no cracking. Definitely experiment with holds, I used the football hold because I was able to hold the breast and baby's head much better, but whatever works for you! Find a great LC, call your local LLL. It will be so worth it. My DD (over 2 yrs now) still nurses once a day, and it was worth the initial discomfort.

Oh, and I got into a habit of laying the baby in my lap/couch/pillow, and leaning into her. It worked better at the beginning because gravity really helped get it in there as far as possible, but 2 years later I still catch myself doing it... Luckily I don't have a bad back (yet....).
 
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