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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's the capelet pattern from Craftster: <a href="http://www.craftster.org/forum/index.php?topic=62184.msg588576" target="_blank">http://www.craftster.org/forum/index...2184.msg588576</a>.<br><br>
Row 1: blahdeblah, pm, blahbluhblah<br><br>
Rows 2 and all ws: knit<br><br>
Rows 3 and all rs: k2, *p to next marker, yo, sl marker, p1, yo* repeat frp, * 3 more times, p until last two stitches, k2<br><br>
******<br><br>
Here's what cornfuses me (for now, anyway, because later I have to move stitches to markers, and pick up stitches from scrap yarn and I have no idea what those things mean): What's it mean to slip the marker? Move it over one stitch? How in the heck do I do that? Just move the marker (uh, a length of constrasting-color yarn) over one? My markers aren't "on" anything. They hang between stitches.
 

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I'd guess it just means to move the marker from the left needle to the right. I think the point is, you purl up to the marker, then do the yo before moving it. Basically, it's just telling you which side of the marker the yo should be on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your help, mamas.<br><br>
Unfortunately, I don't understand raglan at all. I am so angry that I'm all revved up to knit this &&$%% pattern and have to wait until I can find someone to help show me.<br><br>
Does anyone else get POed when she can't do something? (Even if it's potentially irrational to think she should be able to?)
 

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Very frustrating not to understand. That is why I am slowly collecting a rather large collection of "how-to" knitting books. Easier to look something up in a book or online than to find someone to show me!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm in the same boat, as well. I looked in my two books and neither has raglan even in its index. What books do you currently have, Sailmom? I was thinking about getting <i>Knitting without Tears</i>.
 

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OK, visualize a baseball shirt ... sleeves in blue, torso in white. Diagonal lines where the sleeves hook on to the body part of the shirt. That's what a "raglan" looks like.<br>
(example: <a href="http://www.knitty.com/issuesummer05/PATTbaseball.html" target="_blank">http://www.knitty.com/issuesummer05/PATTbaseball.html</a>)<br><br>
When you knit such a garment from the top down, you start at the neckband, and then (typically) increase at the front and back for both left and right sleeves. The markers mark the diagonal lines on the baseball shirt; the stitches in between each pair of markers form the "shoulders" of the capelet (and, in a normal sweater, the sleeves... but not in the capelet, obviously, b/c that doesn't have sleeves). (So, four sets of increases each identified by a marker, usually increasing one stitch before the marker, and one stitch after the marker. It might be helpful to use two types of markers.. one to note left shoulder/sleeve, one to note right shoulder/sleeve.)<br><br>
Does that help?<br><br>
Knitpicks also just put up a sleeve tutorial that shows pictures of various different styles of sleeves, and describes their construction generally.
 

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I have The Complete Idiot's Guide to Knitting and Crocheting, and Stitch and Bitch. I have checked several things out at the library - complete encyclopedic guides etc, but find those too cumbersome/expensive for home use. I also tend to google a stitch or pattern I am having trouble with and flip web pages until I find a good description or pictures explaining what I want to do. I learned how to do short rows in front of the computer!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 
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