Mothering Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
cross posted in Canada forum<br>
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br><br>
So I'm writing this post to find feedback from families in Ontario who have experience with this element of the elementary curriculum.<br><br>
We are a family who does not own a TV, nor do we intend to ever own one. We may watch a movie once in a while during the winter months on our 13" laptop, or stream a tv show from the internet for ourselves. Dd may watch a movie at grandma's house (planet earth or the likes) or we may rent something that we think is interesting and watch it together from time to time (again on the laptop). This all said, media is not a huge part of our lives. We limit all disney character items (etc) from our home and encourage toys and items of interest that have no distinct media reference. If we receive media related items we donate them and dd is aware and ok with this.<br><br>
So that's the back up...now for my dilemna...<br><br>
So dd has been in montessori school - one where they do not encourage media at all and have parent workshops on media influences etc. However, we are considering that she may have to go to the public system next year due to my upcoming mat leave. I was reading the curriculum as I was mainly worried about her advanced level of intelligence and how that would work out for her in gr. 1, and stumbled across this whole section of "Media Literacy" where they study movies, cartoons, advertisements etc. I'm floored really...all this time we have worked to keep this out of our lives and now they are going to teach her about this stuff.<br><br>
There was a specific section of the curriculum outline where they looked at advertisements for toys and questioned the children, "now would this be for a boy or girl" - brutal...in our family, toys are gender neutral.<br><br>
Anyways, I'm writing to seek guidance from a family who may relate to where I'm coming from and have experience in the public education system such that you could advise how you deal with this component.<br><br>
Many thanks,<br>
m
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
oh and I almost forgot...<br><br>
the balanced food program!<br><br>
I can't even express how terrible this is for dd. One 15 minute break in the am and one 15 minute break in the pm to EAT! She'll lose it.<br>
I just recently posted somewhere else about dd's eating habits, she eats 8-10 times/day on average. And she is a really really slow eater.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> maybe I shouldn't have gotten pg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,903 Posts
Most media literacy programs are directed at educating children so they can understand how media manipulates and influences people. It helps them to resist the allure of advertising. It's supposed to get them thinking about the endless messages they get in movies, advertising, t.v., magazines, billboards and bus shelters etc.<br><br>
Much of media content is targeted to one gender or another. The point of the curriculum is to get kids thinking about those gender biased messages, not to reinforce them.<br><br>
Unless your children never visit friends, attend sleepovers, go to birthday parties at movie theatres etc. etc., they are going to encounter all of these media. You won't always be able to control what they see and do. Media literacy curricula are geared to giving children tools to manage media themselves.<br><br>
As for the nutrition schedule, how has she been managing at Montessori? Has she been eating that frequently while in a full-day program? Even in a regular morning break/lunch/afternoon break school, she would not be able to eat more than 3 times during a regular 9 to 3:30 school day. Two breaks does seem like a hardship - I wonder how other families cope.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,576 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ollyoxenfree</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15431045"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Most media literacy programs are directed at educating children so they can understand how media manipulates and influences people</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
agreed. I'd talk to the school and find out what they really do and how much time it takes up.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Unless your children never visit friends, attend sleepovers, go to birthday parties at movie theatres etc. etc., they are going to encounter all of these media.</td>
</tr></table></div>
yep. You aren't raising her in a cave! She's going to learn about media eventually, and chances are a school program will be a more gentle introduction than a surprise at a play date.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Even in a regular morning break/lunch/afternoon break school, she would not be able to eat more than 3 times during a regular 9 to 3:30 school day.</td>
</tr></table></div>
Were the 2 15-min breaks in addition to lunch?<br><br>
Honestly, I think that's reasonable and healthy. She'll either learn to eat a little faster or she'll have a big snack when she first gets home.<br><br>
It's normal and healthy to let a toddler graze, but as kids get older, it's good to adjust our expectations of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,864 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>ollyoxenfree</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15431045"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Most media literacy programs are directed at educating children so they can understand how media manipulates and influences people. It helps them to resist the allure of advertising. It's supposed to get them thinking about the endless messages they get in movies, advertising, t.v., magazines, billboards and bus shelters etc.<br><br>
Much of media content is targeted to one gender or another. The point of the curriculum is to get kids thinking about those gender biased messages, not to reinforce them.<br><br>
Unless your children never visit friends, attend sleepovers, go to birthday parties at movie theatres etc. etc., they are going to encounter all of these media. You won't always be able to control what they see and do. Media literacy curricula are geared to giving children tools to manage media themselves.<br><br>
As for the nutrition schedule, how has she been managing at Montessori? Has she been eating that frequently while in a full-day program? Even in a regular morning break/lunch/afternoon break school, she would not be able to eat more than 3 times during a regular 9 to 3:30 school day. Two breaks does seem like a hardship - I wonder how other families cope.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I agree on the media. Also the "media" is not restricted to tv, but magazines & other print ads too.<br><br>
She would have 3 times to eat, not just the 2 breaks in the morning/afternoon. There is also breakfast. She can have a snack, supper & after supper snack when she is at home. That is 7 times a day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,690 Posts
Yes, depending of course on the teacher and the school, the media literacy curriculum can be very, very good. Think of it as learning from an early age to look analytically and, where necessary, critically at the world around her. That is an important skill, regardless of whether she views media herself or not.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,839 Posts
My college students need media literary. Start 'em early!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Ok, so after a talk last night with DP, I hear you...we are not trying to raise her in a cave. It was just a shock that they apparently spend the same amount of time on this as they do on math and language. It just irked me somewhat.<br><br>
Regardless, I know I have to open my eyes a little. And allow hers to be open and expanded.<br><br>
About the food. There is not a lunch, only the two 15 minute breaks. And in her current montessori school she is enjoying a snack when she needs it...they are able to choose when they eat, even if that means 4 snacks daily.<br><br>
thanks for the stimulating conversation...I feel a little flamed but luckily I don't wear my heart on my sleeve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
The media literacy is one component of the Language curriculum- I know I am a teacher in Ontario. I can tell you that it is covered in a holistic way and not treated separately. We covered persuasive texts/writing recently and it was a great way to have a discussion about how media influences students and that they should be aware of this influence. My students came out more critically aware of how media and advertising influences them. Media literacy does not take the same amount of time as reading and writing plus I use it in my lessons and not as stand alone. Your daughter will be influenced by media indirectly by her peers. If you are concerned about how media will be covered speak to her teachers. I have students who have no television and they are able to give some of the best ideas/conversations about how media influences us.<br><br>
I think you mean your daughter will be going on the balanced school day. My understanding is that there is an adjustment period for the first few weeks but that the kids get used to it quickly and adjusting their eating. I would say that if your daughter seems to be struggling with the eating after a month speak to the teacher and see what you can arrange. I allow students who are hungry before our snack time to eat early. Also I have found that slow eaters at home usually speed up at school so they can get out and play.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
thank you mamatowill. That was really helpful to hear.<br><br>
So with the balanced day eating...do they really only get 15 minutes? This seems so impractical to me. Also...is this really healthy. I strongly feel that grazing is super important throughout the day. Would a teacher support that need if dd had to? Dd isn't just slow at home, she's slow at school too, but the teacher supports that is just her way. But I guess adapting to our surroundings is important too. To be honest we tried her in public kindergarten at the beginning of the year and she was miserable because of this eating situation. She had a 30min bus ride to and from and they did not allow eating on the bus. That meant from 8:30-4:25 she had only two chances to eat and didn't have enough time to finish what I sent for her...despite still being "starving". She did a month and we pulled her...it was too stressful for this and other reasons. (mixing a week with montessori and public was a disaster for her).<br><br>
anyway...I'm interested to see how this will all pan out in IRL for her. We are still not totally convinced that we will change her...but it's on the table.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
I will be honest and say it depends on the teacher. I know that I am seen as being too "lenient" about things like that by other teachers. I have found that generally the older the teacher the less likely they are to be tolerant. Definitely ask the teacher what his/her policy is. I know that most teachers are very willing to accomodate students requests especially if parents approach it in a way that shows that home/school is a partnership. Schools only give 20 minutes at the most to eat during the day. Your daughter will be a year older so that might make a difference to her and eating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,903 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>northcountrymamma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15433617"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Ok, so after a talk last night with DP, I hear you...we are not trying to raise her in a cave. It was just a shock that they apparently spend the same amount of time on this as they do on math and language. It just irked me somewhat.<br><br>
Regardless, I know I have to open my eyes a little. And allow hers to be open and expanded.<br><br>
About the food. There is not a lunch, only the two 15 minute breaks. And in her current montessori school she is enjoying a snack when she needs it...they are able to choose when they eat, even if that means 4 snacks daily.<br><br>
thanks for the stimulating conversation...I feel a little flamed but luckily I don't wear my heart on my sleeve.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I'm sorry if you felt flamed. I thought my post was responding to your concerns with factual information and a pragmatic view. I wrote it in a hurry so if it was abrupt or harsh, I didn't mean it that way. I was also sympathizing about the nutrition break situation. It doesn't seem like a good schedule, even for a child who eats at typical speed.<br><br>
To address your concerns about media literacy a little further, I have been fairly impressed with the programs that my dc have experienced. They have become quite critical and not just about advertising. This month, DD has been deconstructing articles from newspapers and news magazines, looking for reporting biases, analyzing background context, looking at manipulation with language and images (photos, cartoons, graphs etc.). In the past, they have had to walk through the grocery store and then prepare a report about the in-store marketing - on banners and on shopping carts, in-store coupons, "free samples", product placement on the shelves etc. The media literacy program is ongoing and is very relevant to their day-to-day lives.<br><br>
In some ways, media literacy is as important for responsible citizenship as math and reading. Many children will figure out basic math and reading without requiring a lot of instruction. They are still quite impressionable though, and easily influenced by media - heck, so are most adults. It's important to learn to view media with a critical eye from a young age.<br><br>
On a slight tangent, my DS is taking a film studies course this year in high school. I have a new appreciation for film as an area of study, similar to English literature. Like a literature course, they study artistic technique as well as content - themes, plot, setting, character development, narrative devices etc. etc. - but also use of camera, lighting techniques, music, etc. Frankly, I think it would be useful and relevant for students to study film as well as literature, these days. It's an art form that they encounter just as frequently as books, and should be given more attention than it is.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top