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I went to meet the therapist today for ds1 and the family in general. I really liked her a lot, but I was a little uncomfortable with her not even having met my son to talk to me about meds. Maybe I'm just sensitive, because for me (personally, totally personally and would never jugde anyone else for making a different decision) I do not want to put him on meds unless I had exhausted every other possible alternative, diet, therapy, alternative medicine, homeschooling, etc. I told her this before hand, and she seemed a little uneasy with my decision. She said, "now, don't think I am trying to change you mind, but blah, blah, blah" I said, "no, don't worry. I've read all the studies and I am very educated on the medications, so you won't change my mind."<br><br>
But besides that, I really liked her, and I think that ds1 will too. She seemed to have a lot of good info and siad she thought cognitive behavioral therapy would be good. That's what my sister, a special ed teacher, suggested too. Problem is, I'm not sure exactly what that is though! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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You really have to do what feels right FOR YOU and your family. My son has different issues & isn't on the spectrum, but we have this in common with ASD families: you'll see a ton of different therapists and doctors who will likely have all sorts of opinions on diagnosis, treatment, etc--and out of all of that information, the final decision falls to you and your partner. It's a lot of pressure, and I've found that following your "gut" is as good a path as any other, if not better.
 

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I'm glad you liked her. I don't know what cognitive behavior therapy would look like in an autism case. I've had it myself for OCD but that is way different. Changing your behavior to change your thinking might be a definition that at least fits what I know.
 

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I was trained as a cognitive-behavioral therapist. I don't practice it with adults (but, then again, I don't practice at all right now) because I find it insulting and also doesn't get to the root of most problems...but, with young children, it can make a lot of sense it certain situations.<br><br>
Cognitive-behavioral interventions are simply interventions that change behavior and thinking. They can impact each other, like sbgrace said, or they can function separately. My guess is this therapist does a sort of ABA mixed with RDI kind of approach (which is hard to imagine only because these two schools don't mesh). My guess too is that she'll lean more toward the ABA as this is the usual approach for autism.<br><br>
Hope that's a little helpful.
 

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Thank you so much! It makes sense with what she was saying, imagine that! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> So we'll see where it goes, and then go from there. I figure if it does work out with this woman, great, if not, we'll find someone else. If nothing else, this journey is teaching me patience. Not to say that I don't want everything fixed <b>now</b>, but accepting that it is going to be a long journey, with lots of ups and downs. Now I just need to remember that when he's totally tantruming!
 
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