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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am getting ready to transplant my starters into their "forever container" as we have to garden with containers this year.

Would it be possible to use plastic milk containers (with the top cut off, of course) to grow some things? Probably one plant per gallon depending on what we grow?

What works best to plant tomato plants in?

And what about squash and cucumbers? Not sure what woudl be good for that to contain produce plus give the plant enough room to grow...?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looks like i'll just have to try it and report back! LOL. Maybe i'll have my kiddo's help me decorate the cartons so the sides aren't so clear to dry the soil out so quickly. I'll let you know :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Awesome - glad to hear it works for people!

I have a ton hanging off my back porch, as we recycle and it's getting close to recycling day (I usually have an entire van full of recyclables so I take it right up to the recycling center down the road when they're here once a month). I'll cut up all the containers and keep the bottoms and recycle the tops...

Does anyone know how many plants I shoudl plant per container?

I am growing herbs (basil, chives, parlsey, peppermint, spearmint, lavendar, dill, rosemary, a few others) and some veggies (tomatoes, peas, green beans, green pepper, zuchinni, sqash, cucumber, possibly another one or two).

I know for peas and tomatoes I need something for them to crawl up/bes upported, so I'll get a small bit of trellis and put it behind or right inside the container - but should I plan on one or two herbs per container, 1-2 veggies per container? More herbs? I dont know how much space everything needs.

These are gallon milk containers, btw. How deep should they be?? I've cut them all right below or slightly above the bottom part of the handle.
 

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that should be the proper depth (bottom part of the handle)- you might poke some holes in the bottom too for drainage.

i would follow the square foot gardening principals. i'd do maybe one veggie per container, but probably more herbs, depending on the herb. chives for example, you could do a lot of.
 

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The milk containers may not be big enough to grow tomatoes in. Last year when i planted mine i used 5 gallon buckets for them and for my Cucumbers. I think this is because i found online somewhere that said that they needed more root space. I woud google "growing tomatoes in a containers" there is a few articals that i found helpfull. Good luck with your growing season!!!
 

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The best, most practical answers I have ever seen to these questions are in The Apartment Farmer by Duane Newcomb. The book is out of print, but hopefully you can pick up a used copy or get it from your library, even if you have to order it through interlibrary loan. The book has a chart which tells you volume of dirt required by different plants and has all kinds of interesting and unique ideas for containers.

I got it through the library when we were gardening in containers. Tomatoes definitely need either 3 or 5 gallons of dirt, I think it is 5. We were able to get all the larger pots we needed for only $1 each at yard sales.
 
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