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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My baby is 7 weeks old. I am a teacher and will be returning to work for just a few days before the end of the school year. My husband is staying home with my daughter those few days.<br><br>
I have major supply issues which require supplementing. I have been pumping now for three weeks to develop a "stash". Unfortunately, I can't pump much, so in those 3 weeks, I have only been able to pump 3 oz. Great! Soemthing is better than nothing, right?<br><br>
Wrong. I just went to the freezer and opened the door to find major icecicles hanging down...ok. I grabbed the bag of milk to add some more and it was LIQUID! My freezer is broken and my milk defrosted. That means I have to throw it away. I am trying SO HARD not to cry right now. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/gloomy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Gloomy">:
 

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Awww... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> that stinks. Was it still cold? You could feed it to her instead of whatever else you're supplementing with.<br><br>
-Angela
 

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You have my sympathies regarding the thawed milk.<br><br>
Are you sure it was completely thawed? If it was still partially frozen it should be ok.<br><br>
Also, if it has been less than 24 hours since you found the milk and you haven't thrown it away I'd give it the sniff test. If it passes the sniff test take a little taste. If it tastes ok try giving a little bit to DC. If DC doesn't balk it should be ok. I had to do the sniff/taste test more times than I would care to think about for DD1, for a variety of reasons. Occasionally she even had milk that did smell ever so slightly off and there were never any adverse effects.<br><br>
I have some Supply and Working & Pumping tips if you are interested. Sometimes the Kellymom links change. You can sometimes track them with a keyword search. If you can't find one PM me and I'll try to find it for you.<br><br>
I have copy / pasted below an accumulation of AF info, Reverse Cycling / Co-Sleeping, Bottle Feeding, Supply Boosting and Pumping Tips. I know it's a lot of info but I'd rather let you decide what might be helpful to you or not.<br><br>
AF - SUPPLEMENT RECOMMENDATION<br>
I have heard that supplementing with Calcium/Magnesium may help with AF related supply issues. Here is a Kellymom link for various “Natural Treatments” Jump to the section titled, “Low milk supply associated with menstruation: Calcium/magnesium supplement”.<br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/natural-treatments.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/natural-treatments.html</a><br><br>
REVERSE CYCLING<br>
You might want to consider co-sleeping and keeping the self-serve Milk Bar open all night to encourage reverse cycling. The more milk your baby gets overnight the less he should need during the day.<br><br>
BOTTLE FEEDING TIPS<br>
Are you using slow flow nipples? If not, you might want to pick some up to try and slow down his bottle feedings and give him a chance to recognize that he is full. That may minimize the pressure on you to produce more milk than you should have to. Here is a link to a Kellymom article on how to bottlefeed breastfed babies. One of the best tips is to remove the bottle every couple of swallows to slow the feeding down. Of course this requires more effort on the part of the caregiver. <a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/bottle-feeding.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/bottle-feeding.html</a><br><br>
SUPPLY BOOSTING TIPS<br>
Again, start with the basics, make sure you eat enough protein, drink enough water and limit your caffeine and get enough rest (good luck with the last one). Regarding supplements, consider trying herbal combinations such as "More Milk" or "Rescue Remedy" or have you considered "Mother's Milk Tea?<br><br>
Or you could try some of the various herbs by themselves: Fenugreek, Red Raspberry Leaf, Nettle, Alfalfa, Etc. (check Kellymom.com for a more complete list and info on dosages).<br><br>
It is important to do your own research on each of these herbs and decide whether you are comfortable with them or not. I don’t remember much research regarding Alfalfa however, I stopped taking it when I learned it is not recommended for anyone with Lupus. I don't have Lupus and neither does DD but Lupus runs in my husband's family and I don't want to pre-dispose my daughter.<br><br>
Something else to keep in mind, if I remember correctly Fenugreek is in the peanut family so you may want to avoid that particular herb if you have a history of peanut allergies in your family.<br><br>
Regarding oatmeal (cereal, cookies, etc.), I have always eaten a lot and couldn't say whether it ever made any difference. You could also try Oatstraw Tea. If you are take oatmeal to help boost supply keep in mind it can be filling so don't let it replace your protein/fat. For instance, you wouldn't want to trade your egg and cheese breakfast sandwich for a bowl of oatmeal. Or if you have the oatmeal add plenty of walnuts &/or peanut butter.<br><br>
Also, some women seem to respond well to a nice piece of steak. Oddly enough, the steak would seem to work occasionally, but not always, for me.<br><br>
I have also heard that the milk boosters oatmeal and brewer's yeast have two components in common, Inositol and Choline. Inositol is a B vitamin (It may or may not be unofficially "numbered" B8). Supposedly Inositol and Choline work together to increase the effectiveness of Oxytocin. If you are curious --or for the benefit of anyone else thinking about trying this-- I tried a regimen of 400 - 500 mgs of Inositol and 2.5 grams of Choline.<br><br>
The first time I tried this regimen I didn’t really stick with it long enough to see if it made any real difference but my impression was that the tea regimen of RRL, Nettle, & Oatstraw worked better for me. I tried the Inositol / Choline regimen again recently and saw a pretty dramatic increase, anywhere from a 50% to 100% increase after about a week to a week and a half. However, it seemed to make me dizzy. The dizziness went away about two days or so after discontinuing the Inositol and Choline regimen. If I were desperate I might try it again on a very reduced dose, which would mean cutting the tablets.<br><br>
PUMPING TIPS<br>
Make sure to read the Marmet (massage) technique to improve your pumping yield (see link below). I recently read that the ducts extend up to the armpits so you might want to modify the technique to include this area. Another poster, made this additional suggestion to enhance the Marmet technique, I haven't seen it anywhere else: move the horns a little off center in between massaging, in a pattern, (e.g. slightly up, slightly down, slightly right, slightly left) so that the suction is reaching ducts it might not otherwise reach. Try to follow the same pattern each time so you're less likely to skip an area. This increased the amount of "hind" milk I was able to pump, which has a higher ratio of fat and protein so it is probably more filling. Once I go through the first pattern (12:00, 3:00, 6:00, and 9:00) I run through a second pattern (halfway between 12:00 and 3:00, halfway between 3:00 and 6:00, etc.) I was really surprised at how well this worked for me. As much as I would rather just sit down and let the pump do the work it is much more of a "hands on" experience than I would like; but it does work.<br><br>
Also, if you are coordinated try experimenting with breast compressions and/or massage **while** you are pumping. This saves some time on doing that in between moving the horns around.<br><br>
Also, if your nipples are blanched (white) after pumping you may need bigger horns (aka funnels, shields, etc.). One of the Medela web pages has a picture of what it looks like if your nipples are getting squished.<br><br>
Finally, here are a couple of miscellaneous tips I read recently that I’ve never tried myself but may be helpful: 1) a hot shower between your shoulder blades before pumping. 2) non-alcoholic beer, and 3) smelling your baby’s head, looking at her picture (to facilitate Visualization), etc.<br><br>
With DD 1, when my supply issues were the worst, I would nurse on one side and pump on the other before going to work. This has a couple of advantages: 1) Your Prolactin leveles are probably higher, 2) You pump more efficiently this way if you are more conditioned to the baby than you are the pump , 3) You may be squeezing in half a pumping that you otherwise wouldn't be able to, 4) etc.<br><br>
Also, give some consideration to additional "conservation" methods besides those tips on bottlefeeding a BF fed baby. Such as trying to store milk in "serving sizes" to avoid waste if the caregiver isn't cautious about pouring out only what is needed. This is especially important for the milk that gets frozen because you only have 24 hours to use it once it's thawed. Try storing half portions for the same reason. If baby is extra hungry the caregiver won't always have to waste a whole frozen bag if only half a bag is necessary. Note, the serving size will probably change over time. Depending upon your pumping routine you may be able to tell when you are pumping fore milk versus hind milk or a combination of the two. The hind milk usually comes in towards the end of a feeding/pumping it is higher in fat and protein and it looks more like whole milk. That milk tends to be more filling so you might want to put a little less of that in a serving size, and vice versa. So I mark the bag accordingly. As an added bonus, when DD2 was younger DH would notice she'd fall asleep more easily after a serving of hind milk which is nice for the caregiver when it comes time to planning a nap.<br><br>
OTHER LINKS<br>
What is a galactagogue? Do I need one?...Herbal remedies for increasing milk<br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/milks...actagogue.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/milks...actagogue.html</a><br><br>
Increasing Low Milk Supply<br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/low-supply.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/low-supply.html</a><br><br>
Let-down Reflex: Too slow?<br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/letdown.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/letdown.html</a><br><br>
Marmet Technique<br><a href="http://www.lactationinstitute.org/MANUALEX.html" target="_blank">http://www.lactationinstitute.org/MANUALEX.html</a><br><br>
I'm not pumping enough milk. What can I do? <a href="http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/letdown.html" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/letdown.html</a><br><br>
Pumping Tips<br><a href="http:" target="_blank">http://www.breastfeed-essentials.com...mpingtips.html</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the tips!! I have tried a lot of those suggestions, but there are some that I am going to look into.<br><br>
Unfortunately, I can't trust the milk. The fridge is working on and off and we are pretty sure that it has thawed and refroze a couple times. I am still really upset about it. I hate that now my will have to go the whole day on formula. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/guilty.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="guilty"><br><br>
I can't even pump anymore until we fix the fridge. The home warranty is messed up and I am waiting for them to call back so that we can make an appoinment.
 

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I am so sorry to hear that!<br><br>
I went out and bought the cheapest chest freezer I could find for my milk stash. You might even check out a local "scratch and dent" sale.<br><br>
And then I made my husband buy a generator in case we ever lost power, solely for teh freezer!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 
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