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My DD will start Kindergarten in the fall, so I'm starting to explore the options, and am flummoxed! Please help me decide . . .<br><br>
DD has been going to Montessori pre-K for 2 years. She likes it a lot and likes her teacher.<br><br>
Option 1 is stay at the M school for Kindergarten. The pros: it is very small (18 kids/2 teachers, her current teacher is one of them), the program fits our family's philospohy, we LOVE Montessori, and she's comfortable there. The cons: it is very expensive, and the tuition would definitely pose a hardship; she doesn't really click with the kids there, and hasn't really bonded with any of them; it's full day.<br><br>
Option 2 is the public Kindergarten. We are in a good school district and this elementary school is supposed to be one of the best. The pros: half day, she would meet neighborhood kids (we just moved and she knows nobody here), it's free. The cons: large class (25 kids/1 teacher), much less advanced academically than the M school (they do things that she's been learning for the last 2 years at M school, so she will be way ahead, although she's still not reading so it may not be bad for her to get an extra year of practice; her current teacher is very concerned that she's not reading and is pushing her a bit too fast, although she recently agreed to back off on that).<br><br>
My DD has trouble focusing, *may* have a learning disability, and is definitely struggling with reading, so I have to consider that too. The public school has the resources to handle that, but the M school would offer a much more individualized curriculum and more personal attention.<br><br>
In the long run, I figure it probably won't make a difference where she goes to K, so I'm wondering if it's worth $9K for a smaller class size and more challenging academics. What do you all think?
 

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That's a hard choice. My daughter did 2 years of pre-k and went to kindergarten at a Montessori school and then switched. We kept her there because she didn't make the state cutoff, but the montessori let her start kindergarten. I think she learned so much more in the montessori school than she would have in the public. I think it also gave her an edge when she did start first grade, being one of the youngest in her class. She has adjusted well. It was a little weird for her making the transition. She was used to all the kids being good, and at public school kids would be sent to the principal or got recess taken away. She was really worried that she would get in trouble.<br><br>
We don't live near that school anymore. I'm so sad that I can't send my youngest daughter there.
 

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I think it really depends on the teachers. Can you observe the ps K classes, or talk to other parents and find out about the ps teachers?
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Stella_luna</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7307264"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My DD will start Kindergarten in the fall, so I'm starting to explore the options, and am flummoxed! Please help me decide . . .<br><br>
DD has been going to Montessori pre-K for 2 years. She likes it a lot and likes her teacher.<br><br>
Option 1 is stay at the M school for Kindergarten. The pros: it is very small (18 kids/2 teachers, her current teacher is one of them), the program fits our family's philospohy, we LOVE Montessori, and she's comfortable there. The cons: it is very expensive, and the tuition would definitely pose a hardship; she doesn't really click with the kids there, and hasn't really bonded with any of them; it's full day.<br><br>
Option 2 is the public Kindergarten. We are in a good school district and this elementary school is supposed to be one of the best. The pros: half day, she would meet neighborhood kids (we just moved and she knows nobody here), it's free. The cons: large class (25 kids/1 teacher), much less advanced academically than the M school (they do things that she's been learning for the last 2 years at M school, so she will be way ahead, although she's still not reading so it may not be bad for her to get an extra year of practice; her current teacher is very concerned that she's not reading and is pushing her a bit too fast, although she recently agreed to back off on that).<br><br>
My DD has trouble focusing, *may* have a learning disability, and is definitely struggling with reading, so I have to consider that too. The public school has the resources to handle that, but the M school would offer a much more individualized curriculum and more personal attention.<br><br>
In the long run, I figure it probably won't make a difference where she goes to K, so I'm wondering if it's worth $9K for a smaller class size and more challenging academics. What do you all think?</div>
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As a special ed teacher I can tell you that it wasn't uncommon for us to see kids coming from Montessori, where the Montessori staff told us that they were very concerned about the children's reading (at 4 or 5 years old) and that they suspect a learning disability. Very soon after moving into a "traditional" school these kids did just fine, and ended up learning to read just on time.<br><br>
Why was that? I'm not sure --<br><br>
Maybe because some kids just aren't ready to read at 4?<br><br>
Maybe because the Montessori program doesn't include a strong phonemic awareness program, which some kids need?<br><br>
Maybe because some kids do better learning how to read in the context of a relationship with a teacher, rather than independently?<br><br>
I'm not sure, and I'm not telling you what to do, but I wonder if it's worth trying the public K.
 

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My son is in a Kindergarden Enrichment class at Montesorri this year. I was told that the Montessori is ideal for three years (this is my sons third year). I have the same concerns about next year (first grade). We are worried about tuition costs and his other issues; ADHD and possible Aspergers. Our decision is about 80% sending to public school. My biggest reason is he will have to transition to public school sometime and I would rather it is sooner than later. There are no easy answers and I know at times I will second guess this decision....just want you to know you are not alone.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Maybe because the Montessori program doesn't include a strong phonemic awareness program, which some kids need?</td>
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Huh? The Montessori method has more phonemic awareness in its reading programme than any other programme I have seen in public schools. The sandpaper letters and movable alphabet are the principal tools for learning to write and read and these materials are based 100% on creating phonemic awareness.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>cmlp</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7339034"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Huh? The Montessori method has more phonemic awareness in its reading programme than any other programme I have seen in public schools. The sandpaper letters and movable alphabet are the principal tools for learning to write and read and these materials are based 100% on creating phonemic awareness.</div>
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Sandpaper letters and moveable alphabets are great tools for teaching alphabetic knowledge/phonics. Phonemic awareness is different.
 
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