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<p>A quick question... how do Montessori schools normally deal with second languages?  The school we're looking at for DD (almost 2) is primarily in Portuguese (DD's second language) but they start English pretty early on (I think in the 3-6 group).  However, DD's already pretty advanced in English (her first language) and those kids will be starting from square one in it.  We talked to the school and they said that they might be willing to move her up to the higher age group for English lessons or try something else if we could suggest it. </p>
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<p>Honestly, I'd prefer that she doesn't get any English lessons at all from school since I have a feeling I could do it a lot better at home being a native speaker (the teacher there would definitely not be a native speaker and probably have a huge accent, which is pretty normal there). DH agrees with me (he grew up in the country and has a really good idea of the quality of English she'd get even in a good school and it's not promising). Plus, it sort of goes against the idea of Montessori to stick her in a class where she knows the language already from birth and everyone else is starting to learn "cat".   I was thinking either of providing our own materials from home (like English books, CDs, DVDs etc) or even hiring a tutor in German (her third language) to come in? But I'm wondering how the structure of a foreign language class would work in a Montessori school... if it would be something that they could easily pull her out of to do her own thing or would she somehow be affected by leaving the group dynamic. </p>
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<p>In DS's Montessori school, the 2nd language (Spanish) has been integrated into each day since the first day (actually, they start in the toddler room with Spanish).  It's not an immersion school, but there is a native Spanish speaker there, and she only speaks to the students in Spanish.  Eventually, the children all learn to respond, and eventually converse with her.  The Spanish teacher will also sit with the kids at lunch and have conversations in Spanish, or she'll lead songs or story time in Spanish a couple times a week.  So, there was no opportunity to "pull out" because it was just integrated into everyday life at the school.</p>
 
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<p>In DD's school, they have Spanish 3 days a week.  The teacher comes in and they do some activities as a class (mostly singing songs, I think), and then the kids go back to the normal classroom routine while the Spanish teacher works with smaller groups, which are based on ability, one at a time.</p>
 

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<p>hhmm... I don't know if it goes against the idea of Montessori...</p>
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<p>In most Montessori schools language is pretty organic, and you are right that it is typically learned from a Native speaker.  In my kids' school there are two guides per class, one speaking only English, and one speaking only Spanish.  There are children who speak English as a primary language, and children who speak Spanish as a first language.</p>
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<p>I would not assume that the instructor wouldn't be a native speaker, this is a very important part of Montessori language instruction, and almost all of the teachers at our school have taught in other countries as the English speaking guide, and all of the Spanish guides at our school are native speakers as well...</p>
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<p>I hope this helps and makes sense. </p>
 

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<p>I talked to DH about it some more today and he said that it wasn't until she hits elementary school so we do have some time at least.  However, he was pretty sure that the teacher was not a native English speaker (it would be really surprising since that's pretty hard to find there except at the bilingual schools).  I think the immersion thing would be a much better fit and I *hope* that's what it's like but I got the impression it's some sort of class? Or at least a set time per week where they do English.  DH is the one who talks to the school directly since I'm still not good enough in Portuguese to ask these kind of questions. I know what I'm saying but a phone conversation is a little unnerving for me.   I can at least understand the answers, though. <span><img alt="shy.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/shy.gif"></span><br>
 </p>
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>carmel23</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1278899/montessori-schools-and-second-languages#post_16043475"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>hhmm... I don't know if it goes against the idea of Montessori...</p>
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<p>In most Montessori schools language is pretty organic, and you are right that it is typically learned from a Native speaker.  In my kids' school there are two guides per class, one speaking only English, and one speaking only Spanish.  There are children who speak English as a primary language, and children who speak Spanish as a first language.</p>
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<p>I would not assume that the instructor wouldn't be a native speaker, this is a very important part of Montessori language instruction, and almost all of the teachers at our school have taught in other countries as the English speaking guide, and all of the Spanish guides at our school are native speakers as well...</p>
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<p>I hope this helps and makes sense. </p>
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