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It's my sons 6th birthday party this weekend. It's making me nostalgic for babies and also thankful to live in the modern age.

I got to wondering how many kids made it to 6 before modern hygiene and vaccines.

Turns out more than a third died before they were 6, and 60% before they reached adulthood. I feel truly blessed to live in the world of modern medicine.

http://amechanicalart.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/infant-mortality-then-and-now.html?m=1
 
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It's my sons 6th birthday party this weekend. It's making me nostalgic for babies and also thankful to live in the modern age.

I got to wondering how many kids made it to 6 before modern hygiene and vaccines.

Turns out more than a third died before they were 6, and 60% before they reached adulthood. I feel truly blessed to live in the world of modern medicine.

http://amechanicalart.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/infant-mortality-then-and-now.html?m=1
Reminds me of this that I saw going around facebook a few days ago:

diabetic children picture.jpg

Modern medicine really is amazing :thumb
 

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I cam across this link yesterday and it reminded me of this thread :(

The infectious diseases that stole generations of Limestone Coast families

It was young Grace who succumbed to the disease first, followed by Tom six days later. Then Annie died, followed by Frank, the last of the Wallace children.

In 1874, in the space of just fourteen days, the family in South Australia's south east lost four young children to an outbreak of diphtheria.

The family's memorial, and several others in Mount Gambier's Lake Terrace East cemetery, are a grim reminder of what outbreaks of illness and disease did to families in the late-1800s, sometimes wiping out entire generations.

The official final toll of victims in the Limestone Coast was never made public, but in the region's graveyards, memorials tell the story of families who were decimated by tragedy.

Mount Gambier History Group's Lynn Lowe, who leads the old cemetery walking tours, said the memorials were a reminder of the days when dying from disease was common.

"When you first research them, you think 'how could anybody survive losing so many children'?" she said.

"How lucky we are to have immunisation these days."

One headstone, over 140 years old, includes a memorial to three children, a seven-year-old, two-year-old and seven months old.

The two youngest children died on the same day.
 
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