Mothering Forum banner
1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I don't have any personal experience with this, but I was curious and looked it up on a search engine. What I found is the following:

Factor II is one of the major factors in the human clotting pathway. Homocysteine is normally present in low levels in the bloodstream. It is derived from dietary methionine, an amino acid. A gene mutation for the enzyme methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), will lead to build up of homocysteine in the bloodstream. This condition, called hyperhomocytseinemia, results in blood clot formation and hardening of the arteries, even in childhood. Nutritional lack of vitamins B6, B12 and folic acid aggravate the problem. Women who have the homozygous form of the MTHFR gene mutation (both of her alleles having the mutation) are more than a two-fold increased risk for a miscarriage. Treatment usually involves a combination of low-dose aspirin plus low molecular weight heparin injections. The therapy is started before pregnancy occurs, and continued four to six weeks after birth. Folic acid supplementation is given to patients with the MTHFR gene mutation.

I don't know if that was what you were looking for, but I just wanted to pass on what I found. ~Heather
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Top