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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My family loves muffins. I love to bake muffins. I love to EAT muffins. Help me make really good soaked flour muffins. When I've tried it in the past, they were a FLOP! Not sure what I did wrong (it's been awhile since I attempted them), but I'd love to make a good soaked muffin. Otherwise, this will be the one area I refuse to change (says the rebel within!).
 

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You could make muffins with almond flour! Just make some crispy almonds and grind them up. I can find you a recipe if you're interested.
 

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I have never liked muffins so I've never tried to make them, but the kids do love cheese scones which I think are made using similar principles. Full Moon Feast has a cheese & herb scone recipe in I am going to try this week. I'll report back how they go. Quickly reading thru the recipe, she seems to use sourdough sponge, extra flour which is sprouted spelt & also baking powder & some arrowroot powder.
 

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I've used the NT recipe with great results tho I tweak it a little by adding cardomom, ginger, cloves and cinnamon to the recipe. I haven't made them in a good long while but when I was making them regularly they were a big hit here.<br><br>
As for sour muffins, baking soda neutralizes the acids, thus sweetening.
 

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I make fabulous muffins (if I do say so myself) using 100% wholegrain sprouted spelt flour from <a href="http://www.creatingheaven.net/eeproducts/eesfc/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.creatingheaven.net/eeprod...sfc/index.html</a> . I thought the NT muffins were horrible - some of the soaked flour recipes I like, but not the muffins. For quite a while I made my own sprouted flour from soft white wheat berries (sprout, dry, grind), which made pretty decent muffins, but I never had much luck getting spelt to sprout. The sprouted spelt flour from this company is so good, I use it for all kinds of things that I don't want to soak or sour, including muffins, cookies and quick breads. Sprouting grain accomplishes the same goals as soaking the flour, nutritionally.
 

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AJP,<br><br>
In case you didn't see my question under the sourdough posts.<br><br>
Have you used the Summer's Sprouted Flour for sourdough starter or to make sourdough bread? If so, how were the results and what, if any, changes did you have to make?<br><br>
-Marc
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Fermentula</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Have you used the Summer's Sprouted Flour for sourdough starter or to make sourdough bread? If so, how were the results and what, if any, changes did you have to make?<br><br>
-Marc</div>
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Hubby has taken over the sourdough around here, I'll ask him later is he's used it and report back. I don't think he's made a starter with it, but possibly has used sprouted flour in a loaf.
 

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We eat grains so little here, that I don't think I can be of much specific help. But when I do bake something, I use a sourdough preparation. What I've done is mix up the cake or sweet bread batter with a sourdough starter. I adjust the recipe for the moisture that's already in the starter. I put everything in except for the baking soda and let it sit for 4-6 hours. I add the soda and then bake. I've done sweet breads and cakes that didn't really taste sour only because they had some other over-powering flavors. This reminds me that I should get some starter started. Some fellows around here have been talking about bread.
 

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The best results I've had with muffins is just using my old favorite recipes (subbing appropriately for honey, ww flour, etc.), mixing according to the directions, and letting the batter sit on the counter overningt or for at least 6 hours. They turn out beautifully, and I haven't poisoned myself yet! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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I've used sourdough starter to make cakes & to make croissants & they've never been sour. My starter isn't especially sour so that may help. I think alotof the sourness in the bread comes from a longer second fermentation.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>OceanMomma</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I've used sourdough starter to make cakes & to make croissants & they've never been sour. My starter isn't especially sour so that may help. I think alotof the sourness in the bread comes from a longer second fermentation.</div>
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In Alaskan Sourdough, the author talks about how soda sweetens. It takes the sourness out of sourdough products (but it also makes them bubble up with lots of air, which can be good or bad, depending what you're making!)
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Hibou</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">In Alaskan Sourdough, the author talks about how soda sweetens. It takes the sourness out of sourdough products (but it also makes them bubble up with lots of air, which can be good or bad, depending what you're making!)</div>
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Cool Hibou. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Wow, I go away for a day and look what happens! You guys are awesome. I am going to try adapting my recipe and letting it soak for several hours. I think my next thing would be to try using my sourdough starter. It's pretty strong, so that may or may not work.
 

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And this may be obvious but if the recipe calls for milk, you can use kefir or yogurt and then let the batter sit. It would be as effective as sourdough if you don't need the culture for rising, that is if you are going to add soda anyway.<br><br>
And my son has asked me to do this "pink one." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
GF, I almost always do sub kefir/yogurt for milk. I guess it never occurred to me to just let it stand. My problem last time was the muffins didn't rise much, they took forever to bake, and they never had a good texture. It was very gummy or something. They were edible straight from the oven, but I think I ended up throwing a lot away. (I've been thinking about my last experience, trying to remember what I did so that I don't repeat it!)
 

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Hmmm. Give it another try and be sure to add the soda at the last minute if it calls for it. It should work.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Fermentula</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">AJP,<br><br>
In case you didn't see my question under the sourdough posts.<br><br>
Have you used the Summer's Sprouted Flour for sourdough starter or to make sourdough bread? If so, how were the results and what, if any, changes did you have to make?<br><br>
-Marc</div>
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The loaf didn't rise well using the sprouted flour. But my hubby only tried making it once that way and then switched back to unsprouted flour, so take that for what it's worth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So, GF, I noticed that you suggested soaking them 4-6 hrs. If I wanted to make them for breakfast, I'd either have to get up at like, 3:00am, or we'd have to eat at like noon!<br><br>
If I left them to soak overnight, would it be too sour, do you think? And would I just do a sponge like I do for my bread? Except maybe add all the wet ingredients (kefir, egg, oil, etc.) to the sourdough starter, add the flour, let stand overnight, and in the morning add the soda, salt, sweetener, and extras (blueberries, cranberries, raisins, apples, bananas)?
 
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