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- and thank God all of the cases were in vaccinated persons or their illnesses would have been more severe!!!! :eek:

The health department says no one has been hospitalized in any of these cases. They credit that, in part, to the fact that all of those people were all vaccinated, which lowered the chances of extreme symptoms.Dr. Jeff Duchin of Seattle-King County Public Health said mumps outbreaks can occur even in vaccinated populations because the disease is highly contagious and because a minority of people don’t respond to the vaccine and remain susceptible.
"Vaccination provides very good protection, but not 100 percent," he said. "MMR vaccine is on average 85 percent protective for mumps after two doses."

No mention of the federal lawsuit against Merck for faking the immunity numbers.

Where is the science or evidence in those statements? How does anyone know if being vaxed helps to make an illness less severe? Where are the studies?

http://komonews.com/news/local/health-officials-investigate-possible-mumps-outbreak-in-king-county
 

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There really needs to be a HUGE rethink about combining live viruses.

The Merck scientist I spoke with recently also acknowledged that viral interference can affect the potency of individual MMR ingredients; that explains why the company added a whopping dose of chickenpox vaccine to the ProQuad shot, several times more than the standalone chickenpox vaccine contains.
These quotes (above and below) are from an article written in 2009: Autism Explosion Followed Big Change in MMR Shot

In 1990, Merck & Co., manufacturer of the mumps-measles-rubella vaccine known as the MMR, made a significant but little-noticed change: It quadrupled the amount of mumps virus in the combination shot, from 5,000 to 20,000 units. Then in 2007 it reversed course, reducing the amount to 12,500 units. Neither the measles nor the rubella (German measles) component of the MMR was changed at all -- each remained at 1,000 units throughout.
Merck’s decision to cut back on the increase in the mumps vaccine also is surrounded by interesting timing. The cutback, in 2007, came at the same time Merck announced it was suspending its recently introduced, much-hyped four-in-one shot, ProQuad -- the MMR with the chickenpox vaccine added to it. In suspending ProQuad, Merck cited a shortage of chickenpox vaccine; subsequently, a study showed ProQuad caused twice as many fever-induced seizures as separate MMR and chickenpox shots given at the same time, and a CDC advisory committee withdrew its preferential recommendation of the vaccine.
In the real world, children rarely get two viral illnesses at once -- for instance, chickenpox and rubella. But when they do, viruses tend to interact -- or interfere -- with each other in unpredictable and synergistic ways. One example: Studies in the UK and Iceland showed that when mumps AND measles epidemics hit these populations in the same year, the risk of inflammatory bowel disease spiked. That's an epidemiological argument for immune interference, and a striking fit with the observations by Wakefield, and thousand of parents, that a similar condition occurs in many children with regressive autism after they get the measles-mumps-rubella shot.
Two additional points worth noting: After the increase in 1990 and decrease in 2007, there is still more than twice as much mumps virus in the MMR as there was in 1990.

The changes in the mumps virus component of the MMR serves as a potent reminder of something else: MMR is not one thing but three different exposures. And over the period 1980-2009 the MMR has changed significantly at least twice, making epidemiological studies even more difficult to interpret.
So all that mumps virus in the MMR and even after two doses, people are still contracting mumps.
 

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