Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,851 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm488978.htm

"So, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Rubin and his team studied college-age participants’ response to a third vaccine dose. Participants responded with a sharp increase in antibodies within the first month after vaccination, but levels went down to nearly pre-dose levels within one year.

“This suggests that an additional dose of vaccine is unlikely to provide a long-term solution,” Rubin says. “We are now looking into other ways of improving the vaccine, such as optimizing the structure of the vaccine virus to trigger the production of longer-lasting, more robust antibodies.”

Ouch.

Definite case for letting people acquire natural immunity to mumps in childhood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,825 Posts
http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm488978.htm

"So, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Rubin and his team studied college-age participants’ response to a third vaccine dose. Participants responded with a sharp increase in antibodies within the first month after vaccination, but levels went down to nearly pre-dose levels within one year.

“This suggests that an additional dose of vaccine is unlikely to provide a long-term solution,” Rubin says. “We are now looking into other ways of improving the vaccine, such as optimizing the structure of the vaccine virus to trigger the production of longer-lasting, more robust antibodies.”

Ouch.

Definite case for letting people acquire natural immunity to mumps in childhood.
The real solution is to ban kissing and sex during the college years. Bet that would go over really well!
 
  • Like
Reactions: applejuice

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,724 Posts
I personally don't think it's a good idea for my son to risk becoming infertile by having natural mumps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,075 Posts
I personally don't think it's a good idea for my son to risk becoming infertile by having natural mumps.
Yes, it is interesting that the solution always seems to be "let's throw our hands up and just all get the disease!" and not "let's improve the vaccine" like the link actually recommends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,825 Posts
Mumps is usually okay before puberty. Even after puberty, infertility is vanishingly rare.
some links on the topic http://livehealthy.chron.com/infertility-caused-mumps-1232.html
http://www.irishhealth.com/askdoc.html?q=4752
http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Mumps/Pages/Complications.aspx this last one includes several other complications for you to worry about!


However, male sperm seem to be on a downward trajectory.
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/sperm-coun...-due-everyday-plastics-say-scientists-1506746

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/scientists-warn-of-sperm-count-crisis-8382449.html

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-158463/Why-male-fertility-decline.html

This discussion is an interesting example of the inability of human beings to properly judge risks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,628 Posts
Yes, it is interesting that the solution always seems to be "let's throw our hands up and just all get the disease!" and not "let's improve the vaccine" like the link actually recommends.
IIRC your stance to date has been that the current vaccines (as well as the schedule) are safe and effective.

Would you ever suggest separating the combo vaccines to see if they are more effective that way? Would you ever suggest spacing out certain vaccines to see if they are more effective that way?

Do you think vaccines need improvement or do you think they are safe and effective as is?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,724 Posts
This discussion is an interesting example of the inability of human beings to properly judge risks.
I completely agree. The vaccine discussions we have here make for fascinating examples of this. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,849 Posts
The floating of the "light" version one now gets if they are vaccinated, where have we heard that before?

The news articles from the areas surrounding the Midwest were so many colleges have had outbreaks, they keep saying that doctors are not diagnosing these students in a timely manner due to vaccination records. That's troubling but we see this with other diseases related to vaccines.
Mild because it's not diagnosed until you are almost over not "mild". There also seems no supporting data on this "mild" vs time diagnosed.

Mumps being so mild to begin with clearly seeing large outbreaks among fully vaccinated seems to be an issue for the now "new normal".

Given the choice I would certainly like my son to get wild mumps during childhood vs fully vaccinating and suffering a vaccine failure in adulthood. Childhood risk vs adult risk, night and day to me. Assuming vaccines protect vs reality, also night and day to me.

None are 100% but this clearly finding out as an adult you have no protection and that booster they are giving isn't slowing those outbreaks either, quite the mess-IMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,628 Posts
I personally don't think it's a good idea for my son to risk becoming infertile by having natural mumps.
This is hindsight of course, but I personally don't think it was a good idea for my son to risk what he did by having the MMR. To add insult to his injury, his titres for measles, mumps and rubella are all ZERO. I would gladly trade all my current worries for worrying about the really rare risk of infertility through natural mumps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,851 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Definite case for letting people acquire natural immunity to mumps in childhood.
I personally don't think it's a good idea for my son to risk becoming infertile by having natural mumps.
Yes, it is interesting that the solution always seems to be "let's throw our hands up and just all get the disease!" and not "let's improve the vaccine" like the link actually recommends.
Let's re-look at what I actually said. I said it made a case for letting people get mumps in childhood. No one becomes infertile from mumps if pre-pubescent. Mumps is quite common in college age adults. Yes, I would like it if my post pubescent son had this disease under his belt. Trying to vax your way out of mumps does not appear to be working.

As per let's improve the vaccine -sure -go for it.

The current reality is the mumps vaccine does not work well, and mumps in children is typically benign. It might be better to get the disease young and get it over with. People have to make decisions on current realities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,849 Posts
This is hindsight of course, but I personally don't think it was a good idea for my son to risk what he did by having the MMR. To add insult to his injury, his titres for measles, mumps and rubella are all ZERO. I would gladly trade all my current worries for worrying about the really rare risk of infertility through natural mumps.
Knowing titer results IMO are very useful!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,720 Posts
Mumps induced orchitis is very rare. It happens in adolescent and adult men who contract mumps and involves just one testicle when it does happen - a man can repopulate the earth with the other testicle, so why is infertility a problem? Many men became infertile from their mothers' prescription of DES before they were born, but since the doctor meant well, that is OK?

Oophritis is an even rarer side effect and will involve one ovary also when it does happen.

Mumps is known in the medical literature to prevent ovarian cancer for women in later life. So there are advantages to surviving the natural disease process, the best being lifelong immunity in the adult years.
 
  • Like
Reactions: samaxtics

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,851 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I would like to see if we can get consensus that the mumps portion of MMR has efficacy problems that need addressing.

What say thee?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,825 Posts
I would like to see if we can get consensus that the mumps portion of MMR has efficacy problems that need addressing.

What say thee?
I say aye, there are efficacy problems and they do need addressing.

And I would hate to see Merck get away with continuing to profit with a defective vaccine. But you didn't ask that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: applejuice

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,521 Posts
There's an outbreak right now in WA...only noticed it scrolling through some of the notifiable diseases reports. It didn't make the media for some reason.

There have been 287 cases of mumps notified nationally in 2016 as of 25 March, approximately 4.6 times the number of cases reported in the same period in 2015. Ninety two per cent of cases have been reported from Western Australia (WA), and are associated with an ongoing outbreak primarily among fully vaccinated Aboriginal teenagers and young adults.
http://www.health.gov.au/cdnareport
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,521 Posts
Let's re-look at what I actually said. I said it made a case for letting people get mumps in childhood. No one becomes infertile from mumps if pre-pubescent. Mumps is quite common in college age adults. Yes, I would like it if my post pubescent son had this disease under his belt. Trying to vax your way out of mumps does not appear to be working.

As per let's improve the vaccine -sure -go for it.

The current reality is the mumps vaccine does not work well, and mumps in children is typically benign. It might be better to get the disease young and get it over with. People have to make decisions on current realities.
It also doesn't help that we are still not offered a choice re monovalent vaccines. Perhaps some of us would choose the vaccine for measles in the younger years and then for mumps post-puberty (to gain what benefit we can given the emerging dubious evidence).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
It also doesn't help that we are still not offered a choice re monovalent vaccines. Perhaps some of us would choose the vaccine for measles in the younger years and then for mumps post-puberty (to gain what benefit we can given the emerging dubious evidence).
Or we could just get mumps.

I had mumps. Show of hands, anyone else?

My mother took pictures of everything...the mumps picture is of a magician giving me a private magic show, because my mom had brought him to Sunday School and I couldn't go,; I was contagious.

It'd be hard for me to make a case to vaccinate against that. It was awesome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
I do agree that I don't want my son to have to risk infertility from mumps (even with it being as rare as it is). I do hope they'll work on an improved mumps vaccine for those who want it. At this current stage however, what we're looking at is higher risk because of mumps being bumped to later in life instead of childhood. Given that choice alone I would rather him have it as a child. I agree with Japonica, if we had monovalent vaccines I could do measles as a child and reevaluate mumps as his risk rises. Sad that's not an option.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,825 Posts
Bumping up this thread to add to the current discussion on mumps. Fascinating that the Arkansas outbreak seems to include a lot of children.

And I'm not seeing pro-vaccine claims about the children being unvaccinated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,487 Posts
Uh-oh. Mumps at Cal State. http://www.nbcsandiego.com/on-air/a...s-Student-Diagnosed-With-Mumps-395189031.html

Say! I know! :idea

California could pass a LAW that would BAN non-medical exemptions. Snatching rights away from those ebil anti-baksers, (and this vaccinated student, apparently), will protect all of those poor students from getting the mumps. I should draft a letter to Sen. Pan outlining my brilliant idea....
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top