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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Honestly, I know that's a silly question to ask.<br><br>
I'm asking here because I think this is a visual-spatial type of issue.<br><br>
Dd3, has trouble with identifying some of her letters. She has no problems with numbers and can associate the number symbols with the same number of objects and she can count fairly high, but letters are tricky for her.<br><br>
I found another book she memorized. I don't particularly read "No, David" to her. I think her sister or her dad must have, and she must enjoy it. But tonight, save about 2 wrong words, she got the book verbatim. I KNOW she's memorizing it, but still it made me wonder. How is it she can remember the story almost word for word and still can't remember what a "Y", "T", "P", and some other letters are.<br><br>
It's got to be the visual thing going on, right? She sees the pictures, and through context gets the memory of the text down pat or something. It's easy enough text. But she even remembers "Pay attention" correctly, and attention is not even a small word.<br><br>
It's not possible to make the jump from memorizing books to reading text without knowing proper letter/sound identification, right?<br><br>
The other thing is, if it's not possible, how to I make letters more interesting to her for her to help her if she's having trouble. We read quite a few books with letters (I mean, they ALL have letters, but specifically alphabet books), and she just can't remember the letters.
 

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I think you probably do need to know the letters, or at least be able to distinguish them from each other. But I don't think that phonics knowledge is necessary for reading.<br><br>
My child taught himself to read at age two (we thought he was just memorizing, but then he picked up an unfamiliar 2nd-grade level book and read it aloud with perfect fluency). Then, at age four, he could read with no stumbling or pauses words like "Odysseus" and "chronological," but he still couldn't spell a word like "house" if I asked him. The spelling thing came around age 5-6, when he started writing a lot.<br><br>
Looking back, I remember him using familiar books as "dictionaries" for unfamiliar books. So if he got a library book, he would read it out loud to me, and if he came across a word he wasn't sure about, he would grab some books off the bookshelf and page through them, looking for words that matched the word in the library book. In his case, it was obviously not phonics that brought him to reading, but whole word/photographic/memorization. At the time, I didn't realize that was what was happening, but looking back it makes sense.<br><br>
In a nutshell, reading can be a mysterious thing, and learning to read is much less open-and-shut than the most schools promise. Some kids come at it from a completely unexpected angle.<br><br>
Tara
 

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My DD memorized books like CRAZY well before she started reading. I sort of think memorization was her first step. In fact, one of the ways I knew when she started to read is that she started to get more of the words <i>wrong</i>. Because when she recites, it is verbatim, but when she reads she may lose her place or get a word or two wrong, etc. Pretty cool.<br><br>
Also, DD does know all of her letters (and has for over a year), but she still mixes some of their names up. She will look at an "S" and say "C," for example--something she never did until she learned the associated sounds. Whether you can learn to read without knowing letter names and sounds? I think, certainly. DD learned her letters first--I think--but it was only a few months later that I realized she had a number of sight words.<br><br>
Whether you can learn to read without being able to distinguish one letter from another, I highly doubt. Though some people do read mostly based on word shape, I think. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"><br><br>
Wrt making letters fun, there are a bunch of things you can do. If your DD likes puzzles, an alphabet (or see & spell) puzzle is a good idea. If you let her play on the computer, starfall.com is not a bad website. Otherwise, we just talked about letters and incorporated them into our daily lives. Honestly, I think it is the kind of thing kids just learn when they're ready.
 

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Sure, I think you can read without knowing all the letters, and I think it's just as you said, a visual, sight-word approach. (Also, I think a person could be able to distinguish one letter from another, as in separate shapes grouped together, without actually knowing the letters or the sounds they make.) Of course, I'm not talking about reading phonetically, and the types of things that could be read fluently would be limited by the size of the sight word vocabulary. Knowing a sight word is knowing a group of shapes that mean something.<br><br>
The way I read now, as an adult, is probably 99.9% sight words, it's just that we as adults know a bazillion words by sight.<br><br>
For example, when my dd was around 2.8 y.o., she could read "Dr Suess" if I were to write that on a piece of paper. She's very visual-spatial and had some issues on top of that, and so she really wasn't reading very phonetically until first grade. Not that I count reading one or two words as a person who is "reading" obviously, but the fact is that in that case, she saw the words and knew what they meant, i.e. she read them. She probably knew what the letters of the alphabet were at that time but she had major speech issues (was in therapy) so I'm quite sure she didn't know all the sounds of the letters.<br><br>
I think I just made my answer more complicated than it needed to be - reading sight words (as in a young child who cannot yet read phonetically) does not involve knowing letters, it involves recognizing a certain combination of shapes. Or at least that's my opinion. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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My DD was a HUGE book memorizer. For her, it was 'Mercy Watson' -- I hate this book now <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">, and Cinderella (still like this one <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> ).<br><br>
Flash Cards --- we L-O-V-E-D the ones by Eric Carle. You can check them out here: <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FEric-Carle-Animal-Flash-Cards%2Fdp%2F0811852563%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26qid%3D1235793709%26sr%3D8-1" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Eric-Carle-Ani...5793709&sr=8-1</a><br><br>
Each card has a really cool animal picture on the back, and attractive upper/lower on the front -- I would let them see the animal AFTER they told me the letter. One problem if you have a visual kid, my son memorized the ANIMALS (ie. I would show him the Q, and he would ask to see the Quetzel Bird -- said he didn't know what the letter was <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">) . . . he had the ANIMALS memorized the 2nd time through, and didn't care what the heck was on the front <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"> . . . A few more introductions and he DID remember both. Anyway, kept my kids engaged.<br><br>
Also - I taught the SOUND at the same time "A says ah" . . . waited on the 'long' sounds . . . do NOT like the animal for 'G', it is a giraffe (I would have like a gorilla for first 'g' sound; we skipped over this animal at first).
 

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We have a friend (now 16) who was reading Nancy Drew books before she could identify all of the letters of the alphabet... she was around 6 at that point, I think.<br><br>
Dar
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very interesting. Thanks for all the information.<br><br>
About starfall.... look at what she's doing on the computer <a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/eatcomputer.jpg" target="_blank">here</a>. Yup, Starfall. She enjoys the stories and activities, but oddly enough, doesn't actually go to the individual letter sections that much, but the stories and games (like the pumpkin decorating one).<br><br>
I do have an alphabet puzzle activity called <a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/eatcomputer.jpg" target="_blank">E-Z as ABC</a>, but really have only pulled it out once. I let her choose most of her activities, and that's one she doesn't choose unless I coax her a little.<br><br>
It's kind of makes me sad in a way. She can totally get into mine or daddy's login, pull up the firefox browser, and pick lots of different websites off the tabs we have at the top, but really, honestly gets discouraged easily when she can't tell what a letter is. She has been known to cry when she can't tell me a letter she doesn't know. So, I've stopped asking. I just tell her what the letters are.<br><br>
She's going to preschool in the fall, and I know she's going to cover the letter of the week things, so I don't push it at home. It's just been perplexing to see her memorize some books and recite parts of stories she only read on starfall (like "run, run, as fast as you can, you can't catch me, I'm the gingerbread man"). Obviously she's interested in books and in the stories enough to retain that information. She's just not that into actual letters that much.<br><br>
I'm finding it highly interesting to hear other perspectives on that. I've had two A/S children, who recognized letters from about 20-24 months on. I was almost certain that dd3 would not even show much interest in reading herself (even if it's not really reading per se) given her feelings about letters, but I guess she's proven me wrong.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Dar</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13274364"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We have a friend (now 16) who was reading Nancy Drew books before she could identify all of the letters of the alphabet... she was around 6 at that point, I think.<br><br>
Dar</div>
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A rose by any other name . . .<br><br>
It may not be necessary to know a letter's name, but, one WOULD need to know its' function . . . how can one sound out a word without knowing the sounds of the symbols? If a child had the capacity to memorize enough word 'symbols' to read a chapter book, the child *should* have the capacity to remember the sounds of the letter symbols.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Dar</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13274364"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">We have a friend (now 16) who was reading Nancy Drew books before she could identify all of the letters of the alphabet... she was around 6 at that point, I think.<br></div>
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That would be true at our house (not Nancy but stuff at that level) - as a preschooler. Clearly he'd figured out phonics because he was able to decipher unfamiliar words. I know he didn't know the names of the letters because he asked about some of them after he'd been reading well for a while. I have wondered if he would have read later with reading instruction because it may have created more noise and complexity to it than needed to be there for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>snowmom5</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13274279"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Sure, I think you can read without knowing all the letters, and I think it's just as you said, a visual, sight-word approach. (Also, I think a person could be able to distinguish one letter from another, as in separate shapes grouped together, without actually knowing the letters or the sounds they make.) Of course, I'm not talking about reading phonetically, and the types of things that could be read fluently would be limited by the size of the sight word vocabulary. Knowing a sight word is knowing a group of shapes that mean something.<br><br>
The way I read now, as an adult, is probably 99.9% sight words, it's just that we as adults know a bazillion words by sight.<br><br>
For example, when my dd was around 2.8 y.o., she could read "Dr Suess" if I were to write that on a piece of paper. She's very visual-spatial and had some issues on top of that, and so she really wasn't reading very phonetically until first grade. Not that I count reading one or two words as a person who is "reading" obviously, but the fact is that in that case, she saw the words and knew what they meant, i.e. she read them. She probably knew what the letters of the alphabet were at that time but she had major speech issues (was in therapy) so I'm quite sure she didn't know all the sounds of the letters.<br><br>
I think I just made my answer more complicated than it needed to be - reading sight words (as in a young child who cannot yet read phonetically) does not involve knowing letters, it involves recognizing a certain combination of shapes. Or at least that's my opinion. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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No, it didn't complicate things. It's really helpful. I was taught phonetically, dd1 learned to read (and picked up fast) in kindergarten and dd2 just caught on to reading, so I never really gave it much thought as to how it came to them. I assumed school taught dd and she just picked it up well, and I assumed dd2 was working hard at pre-reading skills and from context that she picked up the ability to read.<br><br>
But because dd3 isn't as interested/able to identify letters like they were yet exhibits some of these other pre-reading skills, that is what really made me take notice of the actual process learning to read for her is going to be very different.<br><br>
Having words have a shape... I can definitely see that. They use boxes for spelling tests. Each letter having its own box. The tall or long letters have long rectangular boxes and the short letters have short square boxes. That actually helped the child write the letters correctly.<br><br>
I know bed actually looks like a bed with a headboard b, an e, and a footboard d. So really that has a real appropriate shape for the word.<br><br>
Thanks for the thoughts.
 

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To further the shape discussion, some reading programs take word (often sight words) and draw around them with straight lines. Something about the shape of the word. . . apparantly that is the same reason that it is easier for adults to read a paragraph of lower case rather than uppercase. In the uppercase words, they are all rectangles. In lowercase, some letters are taller, some drop below the line etc. The word has a distinct shape.<br><br>
Additionally, isn't the montessori approach where the child learns the primary sound rather than the name of the letter to begin with. I was told by a montessori teacher that the name of the letter is irrelevant except to spell aloud, and could be postponed.<br><br>
Amy
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AAK</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13274550"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">To further the shape discussion, some reading programs take word (often sight words) and draw around them with straight lines. Something about the shape of the word. . . apparantly that is the same reason that it is easier for adults to read a paragraph of lower case rather than uppercase. In the uppercase words, they are all rectangles. In lowercase, some letters are taller, some drop below the line etc. The word has a distinct shape.<br><br>
Additionally, isn't the montessori approach where the child learns the primary sound rather than the name of the letter to begin with. I was told by a montessori teacher that the name of the letter is irrelevant except to spell aloud, and could be postponed.</div>
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I think you're absolutely right - and you have hit upon the reason I can't stand it when an "older" person (like my mother, for example, or great uncle) writes an email in all-caps because they think they'll be able to see it better. Well *I* can't read it easier, I think it makes it ten times harder to read than lower case.<br><br>
You are also correct about the montessori approach, that instead of learning the names of the letters and then their sounds, the sounds are simply used in place of the names (omits that first hurdle when sounding words out). At first, anyway; then toward the end of preschool they're usually free to go by the letter names if they want to talk about spelling a word or something.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>AAK</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13274550"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I was told by a montessori teacher that the name of the letter is irrelevant except to spell aloud, and could be postponed.<br><br>
Amy</div>
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I Agree. I plan to try this approach with DD#2.<br><br>
Also - many kids can handle reading WAY before writing . . . if you DO teach letters, try to use flash cards (such as Eric Carle's) that show upper/lower TOGETHER, otherwise the child is learning 52 instead of 26 (my mom's advice, as an M.Ed. with Reading specialty).
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>nettieferg</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13274457"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It may not be necessary to know a letter's name, but, one WOULD need to know its' function . . . how can one sound out a word without knowing the sounds of the symbols? If a child had the capacity to memorize enough word 'symbols' to read a chapter book, the child *should* have the capacity to remember the sounds of the letter symbols.</div>
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I think there's another possibility, that the child had a very large sight word vocabulary, and was able to figure out the unknown words by context.<br><br>
Now that I think of it, this is kinda funny, there were several words that I learned the meaning of by context in Nancy Drew books during elementary school (or other similar books I was reading during the same period) but I hadn't the faintest idea of how to pronounce them - mostly I pronounced them incorrectly in my head - until I heard them spoken some years later. I read that series ravenously - one each afternoon before dinner, kind of thing. I don't know why I just remembered that! By then of course I was capable of sounding words out but I'm talking about some big words that didn't really go by their sounds. Which brings up an important point that we often forget, and that is that there are so many words that are not pronounced the way they are spelled in English, and they simply must be learned by sight.<br><br>
I'm not saying that's necessarily what happened in the case of the friend who was reading Nancy Drew, but I think it's at least possible that the unknown words were figured out by context (or simply skipped) rather than read phonetically.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>snowmom5</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13274670"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I think there's another possibility, that the child had a very large sight word vocabulary, and was able to figure out the unknown words by context.<br><br>
I'm not saying that's necessarily what happened in the case of the friend who was reading Nancy Drew, but I think it's at least possible that the unknown words were figured out by context (or simply skipped) rather than read phonetically.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">: Another ND fan! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> . . . I read the books NOW, I wonder why I thought they were SO great (I mean, the writing isn't exactly literature <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> ) . . . but I really DID -- I would stay up all night reading them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> . . .<br><br>
Okay, my DD sometimes figures words that are tricky by context --- but, an entire book? Not sure how a kid would do this ---unless someone was reading very heavily to the child --- but, even so, wouldn't a person have to point out some of the words? --- Or is the child counting the number of words on the page, and matching that number with the number the adult is reading, then back-tracking and putting a 'name to a face'?<br><br>
I know in the military there are people who work as codebreakers -- but even THEY have some sort of point of reference to work off of . . .<br><br>
I'm not saying this could not happen *for sure* -- just a little confounded on the *how*???<br><br>
At 18 months, DD could *read* Cinderella and Mercy Watson (her 2 favorites at that age) page for page . . . as long as you did not SKIP a page -- then she got a little 'off' in her 'reading' . . . <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
PS - to OP, we also enjoyed the book 'Chicka, Chicka, Boom, Boom' . . .
 

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Many other posters have hit on it I think. I was going to ask this: when you say 'identify letters' are you referring to identifying them by name or sound? I don't think name id is important. Research shows it can actually be more confusing to the process, especially for phonetics.<br><br>
I would then ask if your child is a site reader or a phonetic reader. I think sound identification is important for the phonetic reader. For the site reader, reading may come before sound association with any given letter.<br><br>
FWIW we have one of each, our ODD is a phonetic reader, YDD a site reader.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>nettieferg</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13274767"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">: Another ND fan! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> . . . I read the books NOW, I wonder why I thought they were SO great (I mean, the writing isn't exactly literature <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> ) . . . but I really DID -- I would stay up all night reading them <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> . . .<br><br>
Okay, my DD sometimes figures words that are tricky by context --- but, an entire book? Not sure how a kid would do this ---unless someone was reading very heavily to the child --- but, even so, wouldn't a person have to point out some of the words? --- Or is the child counting the number of words on the page, and matching that number with the number the adult is reading, then back-tracking and putting a 'name to a face'?<br><br>
I know in the military there are people who work as codebreakers -- but even THEY have some sort of point of reference to work off of . . .<br><br>
I'm not saying this could not happen *for sure* -- just a little confounded on the *how*???<br><br>
At 18 months, DD could *read* Cinderella and Mercy Watson (her 2 favorites at that age) page for page . . . as long as you did not SKIP a page -- then she got a little 'off' in her 'reading' . . . <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
PS - to OP, we also enjoyed the book 'Chicka, Chicka, Boom, Boom' . . .</div>
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The thing is. . .most words are built on other words. So some words can be figured out from their similarity to other words. And some vs learners associate sounds with groups of letters more easily than with individual letters. So if they see letters repeated in the same patterns, even in different words, they might be able to decode without specifically knowing what sounds the individual words are making.<br><br>
Aside from that. . .it's absolutely possible to read without phonics. How else would deaf children learn to read?
 

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Another thing is that often kids know something but don't know they know it. If you ask my DD anything, she will typically say, "I don't know." But if you pretend you don't know the answer, she will instantly correct you.<br><br>
How that translates into reading: She thinks she doesn't know how to sound words out. If you ask her what sound a letter makes, she will often say she doesn't know. If you try to get her to sound a word out, she often refuses. But I think she MUST be sounding words out, in her head. She will read mostly with sight words, but if a word is similar to a sight word, she will say the sight word and then correct herself. For instance, she will see the word "spot," say, "stop," and then slooooowly say, "no, spot."<br><br>
And when DD sees an unfamiliar word but doesn't want to slow down to figure out what it is, she will just guess and keep going. Her guesses are pretty close to the real word, and often she guesses nonsense words. The fact that she makes up words at a glance that have many similar sounds to the word she is looking at...clearly she is taking the sounds she associates with particular letters and stringing them together. She may not know she is doing it, but she is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>EXOLAX</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13275614"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Many other posters have hit on it I think. I was going to ask this: when you say 'identify letters' are you referring to identifying them by name or sound? I don't think name id is important. Research shows it can actually be more confusing to the process, especially for phonetics.<br><br>
I would then ask if your child is a site reader or a phonetic reader. I think sound identification is important for the phonetic reader. For the site reader, reading may come before sound association with any given letter.<br><br>
FWIW we have one of each, our ODD is a phonetic reader, YDD a site reader.</div>
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I think dd1 and dd2 must be phonetic readers, though I know dd1 was taught to look for word chunks in school. I can see dd2 actually trying to sound out words she doesn't know.<br><br>
About dd3...she's the polar opposite of dd1 and dd2 on almost everything.<br><br>
They are shy, she is outgoing.<br><br>
They spoke early and had very good vocabulary and enunciation.<br><br>
She had her word explosion very late (about 25 months) and her enunciation has been gradually getting better but was really difficult to understand for a while.<br><br>
They learned letters before numbers, she learned numbers and counting and has not much interest in letters, but she'll count anything.<br><br>
Dd1 and dd2 were content to live life at ground level. Dd3 climbed on tables, over the backs of couches, anything.<br><br>
Dd1 and dd2 love to show off what they know. Dd3 actively resists answering any types of questions and says, "No, I don't want to".<br><br>
They lined things up, she stacks. See:<br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/DSCN67040001.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...CN67040001.jpg</a><br><br><a href="http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t77/casey3girls/stackedinjoneslegos.jpg" target="_blank">http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t...joneslegos.jpg</a><br><br>
She's probably been read to the least, but only because she wasn't that interested in books when she was younger. Now she loves books.<br><br>
***<br><br>
I don't think dd can identify by letter name or by sound. Since she was generally uninterested in letter id, I have not been pursuing either one with her. But, the fact that she brought the No, David book up to the table for me last night, and she wanted me to read it. But what ended up happening was that I said the first line: "David's teacher always said"... and she chimed in with "No, David! No yelling, No pushing, No running in [de] halls". And the next page, "David, You're tardy" and on and on..."<br><br>
I know at this point it's memorization, but she can read the pages out of order. I think she gets a lot of contextual clues from the pictures that go along with it - which I know is also an important pre-reading skill.<br><br>
Until recently, I really thought dd3 was going to be the one to struggle with reading mostly because she was not interested in letters at all. I thought she might have had a learning disability because she resisted trying sometimes and felt bad she couldn't remember a letter name/sound. But obviously, if she's remembering text, her memory isn't a problem.<br><br>
My other two kids didn't really memorize books, well, maybe dd1 did and that was Goodnight Moon. Other than that, they just listened to books I read. Dd1 didn't start reading aloud until K, and dd2 just made up stories about the pictures and did many books that way, but I don't remember if she actually read/memorized the text to go with it. Then one day she could read parts of Green Eggs and Ham and it started from there.<br><br>
I don't know, it's been a fascinating process with dd3 because it's not like I expected it for her.
 

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Don't underestimate the power of "memorizing" a book. It's actually a very important pre-reading skill. Let her run with it!!!!!!!! And the CONFIDENCE that you can read is a huge part of actually being able to read later. What she's doing now gives her confidence.<br><br>
And here's the research in a nutshell:<br><br>
Kids raised in a print-rich environment (read to often, lots of books in the home, etc.) do fine with sight-based reading. Kids in a print-poor environment need much more specific, phonetic-based help in order to learn to read.
 
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