Mothering Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
and I feel like the worst parent of the year. I take really really good care of his teeth. Brush twice daily, no juice, healthy diet. Luckily we caught them while they're very small, but they'll still have to knock him out for a little while when they get filled. The only thing I can attribute thm to is night nursing. He stays latched on pretty much all night. I definitely don't want to day wean, but how do I nightwean?<br><br>
The hygienists were terrible. They acted like it was all my fault and I should have weaned him when he was one. I just feel like crying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,662 Posts
Some people just genetically have "soft teeth" and get cavities very easily. I'm so sorry they office made it out to be your fault. Since you already don't like the way this office treated you can you go for a second opinion or another office you like better. Having to put your little one through anesthesia will be hard enough, maybe you can find a nicer more friendly place to do that so you will have a little less worry and stress?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
824 Posts
Sorry mama, that stinks!<br><br>
Maybe post this in the dental forum over in health and healing. There is a lot of info over there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,205 Posts
If you would like to nightwean your son, I would recommend Dr. Jay Gordon's "Changing the Sleep Pattern in the Family Bed." I love his attitude! And it worked great for us. I was able to nightwean my daughter so that she only nursed during the day and before bed. She actually slept next to me without waking up to nurse. I couldn't believe it worked and that my daughter was OK with it.<br><br><a href="http://www.drjaygordon.com/development/ap/sleep.asp" target="_blank">http://www.drjaygordon.com/development/ap/sleep.asp</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>artgoddess</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8119055"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Some people just genetically have "soft teeth" and get cavities very easily. ?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
yes this is what i was told too. My 4 1/2 yr old has never had a cavity but my 24 mo old has 2! and it looks like more are coming! Im bummed too! But my dentist says its dangerous to knock out a child (use anestesia)he won't do it. We are looking into something that will just make her drowsy though he says thats not without risks either. i am really scared about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">, mama. Something similar happened to us, too. I also felt like a horrible mom. I cried on the way home from the dentist after the first appointment, feeling like I'd let my son down. But we were also really good about monitoring juice and brushing,e tc. The dental visit to get the fillings was pretty traumatic for me, but ds was fine and even asked when we would be going back!<br><br>
If there's any way you can find another dentist, I'd certainly recommend it. Our dentist and staff were great and it was still difficult for me. I can't imagine going through that with dental staff that were so callous. Sorry you are dealing with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
Our DS has horrible teeth. He is 5 now, he was 2 we never got them fixed because they had to knock him out and we figured that he would loose them in a few years anyway. For him it is just cosmetic. They don't bother him or hurt him in anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
It is NOT your fault. Some kids are just predisposed to cavities. Both of my kids had cavities before 18 mos, and I write about dental health for a living ! So it was sort of embarrassing.<br><br>
What do you mean, "knock him out for a little while"? I would ask a lot of questions about that. Sedating kids under 2 is not usually recommended, I don't think, unless they are doing general anesthesia in a hospital.<br><br>
I am going to nightwean DD2 very soon - we are using the "milk is sleeping" strategy that we used with DD1. Basically I will do anything EXCEPT nurse her at night to get her to sleep. It took a couple of weeks for DD1 to get it, but once she did, she slept through and no more worries about breastmilk mixing with other sugars in the mouth at night.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
I'm glad I'm not the only one. My 12 1/2 month old has two cavities, one very small one on one front tooth, barely noticeable, and one big one right in the center of her other front tooth. I thought nursing was supposed to keep that from happening? Unlike sleeping with a bottle. I haven't taken Emma to the dentist, and probably won't right now. I won't knock her out, and I would rather just leave them alone for now.<br><br>
Leann
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the stories everyone. It really does make me feel better. We are starting nightweaning tonight and I have very mixed feelings about it. I think it will be best for the whole family though.<br><br>
The cavities will be filled in a hospital where he can be monitored. I'd like to just get them filled so they don't get any bigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,962 Posts
Some people really do just have bad teeth geneticly.<br><br>
I'm sure James' teeth are going to be HORRIBLE. My husband has caps on all his back teeth. His siblings all have had multiple cavaties, his grandparents and mom have false teeth. His cousins don't have the best teeth. It's just genetics, IMO. I'm half scared to take James to the dentist...I know I have to do it eventually. Should get on that...I'm just scared because I know genetics are NOT in our favor. *sigh*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
This question is kind of OT.. but at what age is normal to start going to a dentist? When I have asked, our dentist says not until 2 or 3. But my ds has almost all of his teeth at 17 months! Should I take him? I am concerned about cavities because my DH has AWFUL teeth. Mine are fine, no cavities. But ds has been sticking his hand in the front of his mouth and whining a lot lately...<br><br>
Back to the OP, you should try and find an AP dentist in your area, or at least someone who is more supportive and will not make you feel bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
ya, they put them under general anesthesia, "knock them out" so that they are asleep. It takes about 1/2 hour for hte procedure, but most of your day will be devoted to this. He can't eat/drink for 6 hours before and will intubated. It is yucky!!<br><br>
When we went through this with my 18 month-old daughter I did a lot of research and learned that breastmilk protects enamel, not destroys it. YAY!! But that really does make sense. Some people are predisposed to cavities, unfortunately.<br><br>
I do subscribe to the theory that IF you don't get all the food off and then night nurse you are feeding sugar to the site, becoming acid, destroying the teeth. But only if FOOD, not breastmilk, starts it off.<br><br>
After going through this with my daughter we became SOOOOOO careful. SO CAREFUL with her and then wiht her little sister after she was born.<br><br>
Then, at 24 months: SAME THING!<br><br>
We had been so good--and it happened twice. I had a lot of cavities in my baby teeth when I was very young--I must believe in a hereditary cause.<br><br>
I don't believe that night weaning is the solution, at least is wasn't for our family. It was all so awful, taking away her comfort measure would just make things worse.<br><br>
The dental procedure isn't so bad, it's the sedation that sucks.<br><br>
Good luck, mama. You're baby will be okay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>moneeleann</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8144440"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm glad I'm not the only one. My 12 1/2 month old has two cavities, one very small one on one front tooth, barely noticeable, and one big one right in the center of her other front tooth. I thought nursing was supposed to keep that from happening? Unlike sleeping with a bottle. I haven't taken Emma to the dentist, and probably won't right now. I won't knock her out, and I would rather just leave them alone for now.<br><br>
Leann</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Leann, just keep a close eye on them.<br><br>
By the way-<br><br>
bacteria from a parent (or anyone) can be transferred to the child if they share food/drink. If the other person has a cavity that bacteria can spread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
"The authorities" used to say take your kid to a dentist by age 3, but dentists now recommend that kids see a dentist before their first birthday, or no more than 6 months after the first tooth comes in.<br><br>
You would have to see a pediatric dentist, probably - most "adult" dentists will not see a 1-year-old.<br><br>
Yes, cavities are caused by bacteria (S. mutans) which are passed from mother or father to child. But the mother or father doesn't have to have a cavity to pass these bacteria. Pretty much everyone has them in their mouths - but in some people, the mouth conditions are such that they lead to decay.<br><br>
As for bfing protecting against decay - it does, if the child is ONLY bfing and not eating any solids. once other sugars are introduced, night bfing actually can contribute to decay, because the milk mixes with residual sugars in the mouth and provides food for the decay-causing bacteria.<br><br>
Good luck with the treatment - I am sure your DC will be fine! My DD will be getting atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) on one front tooth in July, and hopefully that will be all she needs....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,279 Posts
Just thought I should mention this.... both too much *and* too little flouride can cause soft teeth....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you all so much for the replies. I know what you mean Stephanie. I'm not a perfect parent, but one thing I did very well was care for his teeth. I was so diligent, and still he has cavities. I think that's why I'm taking it so hard. I just wanted better for him than I had.<br><br>
Yeah the sedation is going to be really hard to see. I know it will be quick and it's not like it's heart surgery, but still. Scary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
You've gotten lots of great feedback so far. I'll just add my story.<br><br>
My DD (18 months) has decay on three of her front teeth. I became alarmed when I noticed it sometime around when she was 12 months. Asked my local AP moms group for rec's on a good bfing friendly pediatric dentist and made an appointment right away. The first thing I told the dentist (after showing her the decay) was that nightweaning was not an option. She didn't argue, just encouraged me to keep water or a toothbrush by the bed and try to get in there with the tooth brush or a sip of water is possible in the night. That was pretty difficult to pull off without waking DD so i let that fall by the wayside...but if you can do it--do it. More importantly our dentist decided NOT to fill in the cavities at this time (she feels DD is too young for that procedure and I agree). Instead our mission is to stop the decay from becoming worse (which so far we've been able to do). We give DD a good brushing in the morning and then follow that with a spot treatment of flouride gel on the decayed places only. (I know some people don't want to use flouride but it's working for our family). After that she doesn't eat or drink for 30 minutes. At night DD and I brush teeth together with me modeling how to do it. DD's teeth have not gotten worse.<br><br>
So that's what's working for us. Sounds like you may need to look for a different dentist.<br><br>
You're not a bad Mama this happens to lots of us!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,594 Posts
Did you have abx during pregnancy or labor or very early on in his life? That is a huge risk factor for early cavities. Night nursing does not cause cavities, there was an excellent article in Mothering last year about this. It actually has a protective effect on teeth, and helps oral shape development as well. The whole myth of night nursing contributing to cavities got started because nighttime bottles CAN be a big contributer to them, and so many people think breastmilk is just like formula or milk. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: I would only continue with the nightweaning if you feel it's warranted for other reasons.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top