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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, here's the situation:<br>
She is tiny! Weight = 3% on US charts (15% on WHO charts); height = 75% on US charts.<br><br>
She will decide that she likes a food, then one day she won't eat it anymore (I realize this is normal). What worries me is that she eats almost NO veggies or fruits (not even banana anymore). She would live on prepackaged cheese/PB crackers if I let her. She eats a little better at school than she does at home, but not much.<br><br>
And now my 2 year old is starting to think that she can just refuse to eat and ask for something else instead, because I'm always giving the little one tons of different choices after she refuses to eat the first choices.<br><br>
If she weren't so skinny (the bulky cloth diapers are the only reason her pants don't fall off of her), I wouldn't care! But everytime I take her to the DR (which I avoid at all costs), I have to have the whole talk about her weight . . . again!<br><br>
There is nothing physically wrong with her. She is just small. I just want her to eat more than a few bites of chicken, some rice and 2 bites (<1oz) are veggies for dinner! If it weren't for whole-fat yogurt mixed with instant breakfast powder and whole milk, she would blow away.<br><br>
My 2-year old was never picky at this age and I just haven't had to deal with this until now. There are just so few foods (and getting fewer) that she will eat . . .<br><br>
Help!!!<br><br><b>Thanks!<br>
--LEE</b>
 

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Is she still nursing? My dd didn't eat as much as you're aiming for at that age. Your best bet is to encourage lots of nursing.<br><br>
good luck!<br><br>
-Angela
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>alegna</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7331215"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Is she still nursing? My dd didn't eat as much as you're aiming for at that age. Your best bet is to encourage lots of nursing.<br><br>
good luck!<br><br>
-Angela</div>
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same here
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Unfortunately, no, she's not still nursing. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
She self-weaned at 13 months. I couldn't believe it was happening and I just kept offering, but, no, she was done.<br><br>
(The up-side was that it gave me that perfect opportunity to wean my 2-yr old.)
 

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It's highly unusual for a baby to wean that early. I agree- I'd try relactating, it sounds like she really needs it.<br><br>
Yogurt, instant breakfast and cow's milk is not the nutrition she needs.<br><br>
Perhaps look into an organic or homemade toddler formula if relactating doesn't work out?<br><br>
-Angela
 

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Have you tried leaving a nibble tray out (make one for each kid so that your 2 year old won't eat all the 1 year old's food) -- of healthy snacks that you're OK with her eating? Include some high fat foods, some average ones, and let her eat. A lot of kids at this age do better 'grazing'. Even our 2 1/2 year old will often eat part of her dinner, get up and play, and then come back and finish later. (She has a fit if we remove her plate from the table before bedtime.)<br><br>
Remember too that it often takes 10-15 presentations of a food before a toddler will try it. Most parents give up at 2-3.<br><br>
Keep a record of the foods she does eat -- use that as a basis for foods to introduce. So, if she likes rice, then try another grain to expand her diet. Look at tastes and textures to help figure out what works and what doesn't work for her. My kids are both very sensitive to texture. It might also help you to see just how much she is eating. It might be more than you think.<br><br>
Add condiments. Our dd is the condiment queen! (She too is a bit picky - she went through a similar phase when she was your daughter's age, but because she was nursing a gazillion times a night, weight wasn't an issue!) Parmesan cheese, butter, hummus, ketchup, ranch dressing are favorites at our house. (I once caught dd eating the butter with a spoon!)<br><br>
Two final thoughts:<br>
1. Read Child of Mine: Feeding with Love and Good Sense -- it has good tips, and will help you avoid food battles. Remember your job is to provide the food, her job is to eat. Unless she's got a developmental issue (such as sensory avoidance caused by sensory processing disorder, or difficulty swallowing), she will eat enough to maintain her own body.<br><br>
2. What body types are in your family? Is there someone who is of moderate height and slender? My ds takes after my brother (tall and thin). My niece takes after her maternal grandmother, and ate like a bird all during her preschool years. My dd takes after my sister - incredibly muscular and square.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sorry, but relactating is not an option. I'm a WOHM and I cannot pump anymore, nor do I want to.<br><br>
Lynn - Thanks for the book suggestion. DH just put it on his library list.<br><br>
I used toddler formula through month 13 (?) gradually going to whole milk (way cheaper!). I started mixing instant breakfast with the milk on the suggestion of our pediatrician. I did a calorie comparison and milk+inst breakfast has more calories than formula, so that's why I stuck with it. I also add the yogurt to her first milk cup of the day (after breakfast). She only has about 12-16 oz of diary (milk, yogurt, cheese, etc) per day, so I know she is not overloading on dairy.<br><br>
I try to make sure munchies are available, but our house is wall-to-wall carpet and my DH gets testy about having food droppings everywhere. But since I cannot get her to eat veggies and fruits, carrots, celery, apple slices, etc are wasted.<br><br>
I have told her teacher at school to make sure and feed DD at every opportunity, and I trust that she is doing so. I need to remind her again to add soy butter or peanut butter to crackers. Maybe I should take some cream cheese to school as well. Of course, this still does not solve the fruit/veggie problem. <b>Can anyone suggest a fruit or veggie spread that is not mostly sugar?</b> She eats all-fruit spread on her PBJ sandwiches at school.<br><br>
body types - She has an athletic build just like DH and his sisters. She is long and slender with very good muscle tone. She is also very coordinated and can climb very well (a little <i>too</i> well . . .). Not to mention, she is active!!! Sometimes, I look at her running around and I think "Stop burning calories! You need to gain weight!" The absurdity of this makes me laugh . . .<br><br>
I also have trouble with DH. He will actually forget to feed the children (<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> unless it's a "normal" meal time. He doesn't eat often, so he forgets that they need to. He also forgets the after-meal milk cups and doesn't give them long enough to eat at the table or enough choices. I try to stay in charge of food by making sure the milk cups are ready to go before I leave and by suggesting what to feed them, but he doesn't like me telling him how to "parent" . . .<br><br>
condiments - She loves to dip, but then she will hit the food on her tray until the dip is gone and do it again - never actually eating the food. Yes, I will keep trying this option. It worked wonders when my now 2.75-yr-old went through a phase around her 2nd birthday.<br><br>
Thanks for the suggestions so far <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">. Keep 'em coming!<br><b>--LEE</b>
 

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I am lurking... I have an almost 16 month old who hardly eats at all. She is willing to eat just about anything, but only a bite or two. She is so skinny. She lives on EBM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I forgot to mention, I give her Poly-Vi-Sol w/ iron (when I remember) per the pedi.<br><br>
Oh, and she sleeps like a dream - 12-13 hours per night in her own bed.<br><br>
Welcome, GooeyRN, I hope you find something useful here, too. How do you still manage to pump? Are you WOHM, too?<br><br>
Thanks again!<br>
--LEE
 

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I really think the problem here is the lack of breastmilk. I think she needs a good breastmilk substitute. Instant breakfast is full of sugar. That's why it's higher in calories. She needs nutrition, not sugar.<br><br>
good luck.<br><br>
-Angela
 

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Although my 15 month old dd is still nursing, I can relate to the food issues. She doesn't eat much, nor does she eat a wide variety of foods. Luckily, the ped says she is doing just fine with growth. She is just under 50% weight and height, although I still get comments from random strangers about her supposedly small size. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">:<br><br>
About fruits and veggies, I just try sneaking them in like:<br>
- add some fruit puree to her yogurt<br>
- make a yogurt smoothie with bananas and/or berries<br>
- add bananas, blueberries, or pumpkin puree to pancakes and waffles<br>
- make banana, zucchini, or pumpkin bread<br>
- mix finely chopped broccoli into mashed potatoes<br><br>
Also, since you mentioned your dd eats peanut butter already, maybe you could try spreading that on some apple, or putting thinly sliced banana on her pb sandwich.<br><br>
Does your dd like sweet potatoes? Lots of babies love them. You could experiment with different ways to prepare those.<br><br>
I wouldn't give up trying to introduce her to different things. I like to take dd around the produce section at Whole Foods because they have different fruits and veggies to sample. She just decided she liked oranges and pineapple on our last trip. Now I have a giant pineapple on my counter that I am dreading cutting up...it looks so intimidating. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I think the nibble tray a pp mentioned is an excellent idea. Since your dh isn't thrilled about having food all over the carpet, maybe you could get your dd a little table and chairs and just leave the tray there and encourage her to stand or sit at her table. Also, have you tried a <a href="http://www.snacktrap.com/StoreFront.bok" target="_blank">Snack Trap</a>? While they don't completely eliminate mess, they seriously reduce it.<br><br>
Also, as far as your dh not offering food often enough or enough choices, maybe you could prepare some snacks before you leave. You could just pretend you are doing it as a favor to him rather than you "telling him how to parent." I know you should not have to do this, but you gotta do what you gotta do sometimes.<br><br>
Anyway, that's all I got right now. Good luck!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>leewd</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7333510"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I forgot to mention, I give her Poly-Vi-Sol w/ iron (when I remember) per the pedi.<br><br>
Welcome, GooeyRN, I hope you find something useful here, too. How do you still manage to pump? Are you WOHM, too?<br><br><br>
--LEE</div>
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Our ped hasn't mentioned Poly-Vi-Sol. He seems pro-bfing/EPing. He isn't concerned over dd's lack of eating AS LONG AS she continues to get my EBM. She is small (about 20 lbs at amost 16 months old) in the 7th percentile. (WHO chart, I think she is off the chart in american charts) So I continue to pump. She is VERY healthy and has good energy. I didn't want to start with toddler formula's, since I made it so long EPing. I guess I would feel bad. Plus, I don't want to have to pay for it. It would be almost $30 a week. (she drinks about 40 oz of EBM a day) EPing is a huge hassle, but my dd is SO HEALTHY. Unbelieveably healthy. She only had one minor cold so far. I hate getting up 3 times during the night to pump (in addition to dd's frequent night wakings) to maintain my supply, but I feel her health is worth it.<br><br>
I do WOHM, but only part-time. I do have a difficult time pumping at work. I am a nurse, and do not always get lunch breaks, or even pee breaks. I try to not go longer than 5 hours without pumping at work. At that point I take my charting into the staff conference room and chart while I pump. (yep, I have to pump while people are walking in and out. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: ) Its either that or use the only bathroom. I don't want to tie up the only bathroom for 20 minutes! I hate pumping at work, since I get funny looks when people realize I am pumping milk for a 16 month old! (no one bf's past about 4 months here, most start off on formula)<br><br>
I do live my life around my pump schedule. Life is so difficult b/c pumping. It is a major commitment. I know that is pathetic, but its only for a short amount of my life. It is keeping my dd healthy, and gives her SOMETHING to eat.
 

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My ds is almost three and also has been a very picky eater from the start. He also was/is very small, broke 20lbs at 21 months. We even did testing which showed nothing. I was given information about increasing calories, junk like sweeten condensed milk, frying foods and other rediculous suggestions. I'm surprised they didn't just recommend McDonalds, I think that would have fattened him up. He rarely eats veggies and is picky about fruit and meat. It's so frustrating to prepare food over and over that isn't eaten. I try not to stress about it but it is hard balancing the desire to have ds eat enough and the desire for him to eat healthy (which unfortunately, those two desires seem to be in opposition most days) Don't worry, she'll grow and is probably right where she needs to be in terms of weight. Someone has to be at the bottom of the chart, right?
 

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My 25 month old hardly eats, too. She was very petite for a while, just went through a growth spurt, and now I guess she's average. It might be useful to make sure you're looking at a growth chart for breastfed children, since she was mostly breastfed until fairly recently, right? It may be that she really doesn't *need* to be packing on extra weight. Society has this obsession with fat babies and lean children and adults. The most important thing is to build a healthy child, not a big one. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
I also agree that you want to look at the quality of the food and not just the calorie count. She needs something approximating breastmilk as close as possible, whether you get a toddler formula or mix something up.<br><br>
Even if you don't want to go back to a full pumping regimin, what about getting just a few ounces a day? That could make a lot of difference.
 

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My 15 month old hardly eats these days too, and she is also very tiny, maybe just maybe 20lbs. She still bf day and night, as much as she did at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months...she never let up. And while she will eat a wide variety of things, she never eats much of them...<br><br>
A few ideas, my DD will only eat veggies if they are cooked in a soup...I make chicken soup and she loves to eat the veggies I put in there- they are soft but still pieces she can pick up herself. I make miso soup and she eats the carrots from there and a bit of tofu. She also likes lentils, which I cook with rice in the same pot with lots of spice. Don't be afraid of spice for your dc! They like things that dont taste bland! Try cooking pasta shapes, like the spirals or the little macaroni pieces, those are fun (we cook rice pasta cause we cant do wheat/gluten) and try frozen veggies, like frozen peas straight from the freezer. Also berries are sometimes accepted, as they're bright and small and juicy and tasty. Can you squeez juice together to make a smoothy??<br><br>
Oh baby calls....good luck!!
 

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Question-<br>
If she is healthy and thriving otherwise,which it certainly sounds like she is based on your (the OP's) description,why the obsession over her gaining weight? I have an extremely picky eater,who is "small" for his age compared to alot of other 2 yr olds,but he's incredibly healthy and even advanced in alot of areas of his development otherwise. Seriously,our society has a fixation on weight,and THAT'S not healthy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
ETA: I wanted to add,that I hope I don't sound rude here,cause I totally know the concern that your child doesn't "measure up". My dh and I used to be borderline obsessive about getting my ds to eat. We finally just had to drop the issue. It was making me,and dh, a nervous wreck. And when we finally stopped talking about it,especially in front of ds,he did start to eat more. Also,I really wish pediatricians didn't put so much emphasis on growth charts,cause it is SO frustrating to feel like we "need" to get out kids to eat more so that they weigh in at a so called good weight,when in reality,they are a fine weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
<b>Thanks for all the great replies!</b><br><br>
L&IsMama: It didn't start really bothering me until recently. At her 15 month appt, she was (as stated above) weight: 3% -American charts and 15% - WHO charts and height: 75% - American charts. I was fine with this because she seemed to be eating. Over the last 5 weeks since that appointment, she is eating less of a variety of foods though probably not much less quantity. And last week when she seemed to be getting sick, I actually decided not to call the DR because I didn't want her to be weighed again. Of course, she got over the bug in a couple of days and it was nothing to worry about, but it bothers me that I don't want her weighed to the point that I will avoid the DR. And I have a GREAT pediatrician! She offered tons of unnecessary tests to see if anything was actually wrong with Cori. After we discussed it and I said "No," she was fine with my refusal of tests. Our old pediatrician would have refused to deal with us. In fact I left that practice because she was using terms like "malnourished" and "failure to thrive" even though Cori obviously was neither AND she was still nursing!<br><br>
She did test low-iron (anemic for a while), so we give the Poly-Vi-Sol and with her eating less and less different foods, I feel this is a good choice.<br><br>
Sarahfina - I am a friend of spices. Both of my girls love garlic! I even pepper the pureed stuff! I used to do fruit smoothies for DD#1 religiously, but I've been terrible about it ever since Cori has been old enough. She's gotten a few banana smoothies, but that's it. I have berries in the freezer right now, so maybe tomorrow morning . . .<br>
Also, I mixed pureed carrots in with PB today and neither of the girls noticed. Yay! Of course, each one probably didn't eat more than 1 TBSP of carrots!<br><br>
Rachel - Of all the well-meaning advice I was given, adding instant breakfast to milk and adding butter to veggies (I usually add olive oil instead) is the ONLY advice I took. The rest was just nasty (like you described).<br><br>
GooyRN - I commend you for keeping it up! After nursing for 2.5 years through PG and tandem, I was so done when Cori wanted to stop.<br><br>
After reading the posts about relactating, I decided to offer tonight at bedtime. She cuddled up with her cheek to my boob, but there was no interest. The last time I offered (6 weeks ago?), she poked at my nipple gently and then played pick-a-boo with it by pulling my shirt over it and then pulling it back and smiling at my nipple. No attempts to mouth, lick, etc.<br><br>
riverscout - The bread-thing is a great idea! I know she loves the berry-bread they have at school. I should get a quick-bread mix and then add my own fresh fruit or shredded veggies to it. Thanks! (At first I thought the mashed potatoes sounded great, but then I remembered that she stopped eating them . . . I think I might try it for myself anyway <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> ) She used to like sweet potatoes though she never LOVED them like DD#1 did. Now she will only eat them in french fried form. . .<br><br><b>Thanks you all so much and please keep the suggestions coming!!!<br>
--LEE</b>
 

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I think her weight sounds fine. My oldest was 90% height and 5% weight at 1 year. He weighed 18 lbs. Now, he is 6 and is 90% both height and weight. What changed? Nothing. He is the exact same lean body type. It was just the other kids who had bulked up then thinned down (especially on the old US charts, with formula fed babies).<br><br>
I wouldn't worry too much. Sneak in some fruit and veggies, add some avocado and hummis, and get outside for exersize to help stimulate her appatite. Beyond that, relax.<br><br>
It is a HUGELY fussy time for kids. My twins just got over that 15-18 month starvation thing. THey are now eating again just fine (it does take them about 10 minutes of playing with their food before they will eat it though!!).
 

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Anyone worried about their child not eating should read the book 'My Child Won't Eat', it is LLL recommended and is excellent - puts everything in proportion!!<br><br>
ITA with pp saying that our society is COMPLETELY obsessed with weight, the drs are never happy, dd was always too heavy as a baby and now ds is too skinny, I had to remind the dr that the percentage means that there is 5% of the population at that weight, taken into consideration the amount of people who live in each country that's quite alot, I understand your concern but she does sound healthy and happy.<br><br>
I hope you find the answers you need.
 
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