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<p>I'm so bummed out! My 3 year old DD (she'll be 4 in December) has a cavity on her back, top, right molar on the chewing surface. I wasn't really given any other information, just that they wanted to "take care of it" and would use laughing gas, no sedation or anesthetic, and it would be a "white filling." I am skeptical about the laughing gas, but don't want her to feel any pain. Is it totally necessary to fill? Ah! I'm so confused and have never had to deal with this before. Any input is appreciated!</p>
 

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<p>Is it *necessary* to fill? That's a tough one. Since it's on a molar, I'd want to get the filling done because, in my experience, cavities on molars do tend to get worse (sometimes rapidly) even if you brush well and often. I'd think about getting sealants done as well if you haven't yet and can afford to do so.</p>
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<p>I would definitely get the laughing gas (nitrous). I had a lot of dental work done as a small child and it made a big difference as far as how well I handled it. Not so much for pain as for anxiety and it helped me to hold still enough that the dentist could work easily without risking mistakes. IMO, nitrous is very safe.</p>
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<p>--K</p>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>amrijane128</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1278506/my-3-year-old-has-a-cavity#post_16035219"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>I'm so bummed out! My 3 year old DD (she'll be 4 in December) has a cavity on her back, top, right molar on the chewing surface. I wasn't really given any other information, just that they wanted to "take care of it" and would use laughing gas, no sedation or anesthetic, and it would be a "white filling." I am skeptical about the laughing gas, but don't want her to feel any pain. Is it totally necessary to fill? Ah! I'm so confused and have never had to deal with this before. Any input is appreciated!</p>
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<p>for me this would depend on how big it was, if there was any discomfort involved etc.  There isn't a yes or no answer for me, it's situation dependent. </p>
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<p>I'd certainly be using cell salts to prevent it from getting any worse and hopefully reverse the issue.  Best of luck!<br>
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
<p>I was told that the cavity was very small and DD doesn't show any discomfort. Can you tell me more about cell salts?</p>
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<p>I guess I need to do more research on Nitrous, IDK why it just seems so bad to give it to DD.</p>
 

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<p>I would get it filled.  I definitely would not wait for her to end up with a toothache.  Then the dentist will have to freeze it, making it even more tough on her.</p>
 

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<p>Did you notice the Curing Cavities with Nutrition sticky at the top of the forum?  On the last page, there are a few links to some of the summaries in the thread.  Read the very first post in the entire thread, then the last page for some more links.  I _think_ cell salts are linked there?  If not, do a Search for the Cell Salts thread in the main Health & Healing forum, dental stuff is discussed there. </p>
 
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