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<p>Any tips or fabulous tools to help her along?</p>
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<p>I realize she might be too young but she's begging, so I feel I should oblige her interest.</p>
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<p>My eldest dd learned at that age. She found a craft store clockworks (worth about $4) and got fascinated. She treated it like a pet, named it and everything. Weird kid. Anyway, I helped her decorate a shoebox and we mounted the clockworks onto it. She pasted on the numbers from one to twelve. She was able to move the minute hand around and see how the hour hand responded. She learned the "o'clocks" first, then the thirties. She practiced skip-counting by fives and eventually the rest fell into place.</p>
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<p>Miranda</p>
 

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<p>I also like having a real clock the girls can handle.  A cheap, big, lightweight clock (with batteries not cords is nice) can be taken off and put back on the wall when ever the mood strikes.  My girls were forever asking about telling time until that clock crapped out.  The (free) replacement clock is smaller and not so visible and the questions have nearly ground to a halt.  Time for a new one!</p>
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<p>We also really love the Golden Book "How to Tell Time" which I'm not sure is in print anymore (?).  I grew up with it, then I found it at the thrift store and read it to my girls.</p>
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<p>Anyway, knowing that she will need to keep trying over and over and over again will help you with being patient.  Counting in 5's or multiplying by 5's, plus discerning the short hand as it nears the nest hour are the trickiest parts.  Over and over and over and over again.</p>
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<p>Pointing to the clock when you are referring to, say, how much time is left before you need to get ready to get out the door can be very helpful, too.</p>
 

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<p><a href="http://www.ixl.com" target="_blank">www.ixl.com</a> has a few online quiz type things on clock reading.  You can do one quiz a day for free if you want.  Just another way to mix it up (eta:the quizzes I've seen are in the kindergarten level, they may be in others too).</p>
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<p>My kids just ask about time and we look at the clock and get them to read digital ones and let them play with a little pretend clock.  My 4yo was just playing with the pretend clock yesterday figuring some stuff out. </p>
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<p>The hours alone are pretty easy, then the half hours too.  It doesn't take long if they are interested (and know #'s up to 12 or 60 and/or skip counting by 5's).</p>
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<p>Tjej</p>
 

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<p>This book introduces basic times (on the hour and half hour, mainly,) but it is so cute i think it's a good starting point: <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FTelling-Time-Big-Mama-Cat%2Fdp%2F0152017380%2Fref%3Dsr_1_5%3Fie%3DUTF8%26qid%3D1329716284%26sr%3D8-5" rel="norewrite" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Telling-Time-Big-Mama-Cat/dp/0152017380/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1329716284&sr=8-5</a></p>
 

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The kid in the original post is seven now, so I'll bet she's got it down, endless worksheets notwithstanding.

Miranda
 

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Jajajaja
Can I just say, moomin, I was super excited to show off the teaching clock I made.
Anywho...good job with the reading of dates and doin' the math. (More than once I haven't.)
 
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