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Anytime a person converts from non-vax to pro-vax because their child had a VAD, the pro-vax blogosphere pounces on it. It gets a lot of attention.

The quiet reality, though, is that most parents of unvaccinated children do experience one or two VADs in their course of parenting (as do parents of vaxxed kids, giving certain vaccine efficacy issues) and do not change their entire belief system.

My kids have rotavirus (I assume), the flu, chicken pox, pertussis and one of my children has had pneumonia.

Rotavirus and chicken pox were cakewalks; the flu and pertussis were not. None-the-less, I would not rewind time and give them flu and pertussis shots: the problems with safety and efficacy that exist with those shots do not trump the unpleasantness from the disease. Frankly, I am happy my kids won't have to worry about getting and passing along pertussis to any newborns they might have. Pertussis immunity from the wild disease, especially in an unvaxxed individual, is thought to be very long lasting.

I did give my youngest a pneumonia vaccine after repeat bouts of pneumonia. This was not a switch over in belief system. I have always thought vaccines might be the right choice in very specific circumstances.

What is your story?
 

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I don't recall my parents worrying much about vaccine related illnesses. The list was quite short in the 1950s.

They did quite consciously skip the polio vaccine. I'm glad not to have gotten a dose or two of SV-40, even if it really doesn't play a role in cancer. None of us had symptomatic polio. We all had our tonsils and we ate a healthy diet without the sugar highs and lows that may play a role in some cases of polio. I don't think we were ever sprayed with DDT which unfortunately was a common occurrence in the 1950s and may also have played a role in opening access for the virus to enter the nervous system.

My daughter had and survived chickenpox. I did get her a few vaccines. Probably not very helpful in the long run.

My grandchildren have had a few things and survived in good order. I do remember my daughter remarking, in relation to one VAD, "a lot less miserable than I had been led to expect."
 

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Anytime a person converts from non-vax to pro-vax because their child had a VAD, the pro-vax blogosphere pounces on it. It gets a lot of attention.

The quiet reality, though, is that most parents of unvaccinated children do experience one or two VADs in their course of parenting (as do parents of vaxxed kids, giving certain vaccine efficacy issues) and do not change their entire belief system.

My kids have rotavirus (I assume), the flu, chicken pox, pertussis and one of my children has had pneumonia.

Rotavirus and chicken pox were cakewalks; the flu and pertussis were not. None-the-less, I would not rewind time and give them flu and pertussis shots: the problems with safety and efficacy that exist with those shots do not trump the unpleasantness from the disease. Frankly, I am happy my kids won't have to worry about getting and passing along pertussis to any newborns they might have. Pertussis immunity from the wild disease, especially in an unvaxxed individual, is thought to be very long lasting.

I did give my youngest a pneumonia vaccine after repeat bouts of pneumonia. This was not a switch over in belief system. I have always thought vaccines might be the right choice in very specific circumstances.

What is your story?
My kids have had, at least mumps and chicken pox, as well as flu. Two of them have had pneumonia, due to seasonal allergies.

I've had mumps, chicken pox, flu, and pneumonia. I was vaccinated against mumps. I don't think we had anything else, but I probably wouldn't notice something whose dominant symptom was diarrhea. Sick kids, you hydrate.

My grandmother was a nurse, ran a rehabilitation hospital. She believed in sick folks going to bed.
 

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I have had flu, probably twice, the only time I really remember is when I was around nine and had to sit through Swan Lake feeling really bad. I don't know about whooping cough if I did then it couldn't have been bad because I wouldn't have remembered. I had rubella (German Measles), measles and mumps, but no chicken pox. None were as bad as the flu, that I remember.

My kids have had Chicken Pox (all three) and my younger two had whooping cough which was very mild, ie an annoying cough for a few weeks. That's it. None of them have had pneumonia or ear infections, ever.

ETA: two probably had rotavirus, pre-vaccine era.
 

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I had all the childhood diseases - pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, and Hep A. I remember having the Asian and Hong Kong flu and any flu that came around. That is probably why I have not had the flu in years.

My children were breastfed for at least a year. They had chicken pox and the flu. My youngest had measles - that he got from his cousin - who got it from her brother - who got it the first week of school from all those shedding live viruses in the classroom. And the CDC says that is only theoretically possible. Yes. They all had theoretical measles. And they survived.

I worked hard to expose my children to whatever they could get and recover from. And I kept them healthy by feeding them well and conscientiously. So far so good. They always recovered quickly and were well.

My grandchildren are healthy so far. Life is good.
 

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We had confirmed pertussis and it was rough on the baby. It wasn't fun for the older 2 or me, but we all got through. I wish there was a better vax for babies. It can be really rough on them. I also wish the media and doctors were more honest about its occurrence. I think it's super common and most people just get abx for everything so they don't even know they had it.

But, I haven't changed my whole belief system. The kids are still unvaxxed. Even if I changed my plan, I'd feel, at worst, that I was simply naive. But, generally, I'd just feel that my information had changed and I'd adapt to the new information I have.

I can't imagine someone being that hard on themselves to call themselves a wacky anti vaxer or whatever and then feel so completely confident that they have the right decision now. If they truly were like that, I'd imagine they'd flip flop the other way again the minute a kid had something go wrong with a vax or a VAD.
 
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