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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I went back to work, I had close to 200oz stashed in my freezer. I have been back to work now for 7 months and sadly, my pumping hasn't been keeping up with DS lately and we are down to 3oz left in the freezer. I am forced to buy formula to make up the difference with what I bring home. I normally bring home 6-8 oz (3 pumping sessions) and DS eats 10-14oz the past 3 weeks.<br><br>
So.....it breaks my heart that I couldn't breastfeed exclusively for a year <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
I went to buy formula yesterday and was saddened by the first 3 ingredients on all the cans which were non fat milk, vegetable oil and corn syrup <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/irked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="irked">: Then about 30 ingredients I can't pronounce.<br><br>
Someone suggested just giving solids or trying to put him off till I get home from work but some days, he will be gone through my milk by lunch time. I can't make him wait 5 hours for me.<br><br>
I have tried all the herbs and oatmeal that people suggest but I really just think it's the PCOS combined with return of AF this past month.<br><br>
I'm just sad knowing this week will be the first time ever he gets formula. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I forgot to ask....<br><br>
There was a choice between formula for 0-12 months and 9-24 months. Since DS is almost 10 months, I got the "toddler formula".<br><br>
But now I just read this on the can<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">for toddlers 0-24 months who are transitioning from infant formula or breastmilk to whole milk and are eating solids foods. Toddler formula is a nutritious alternative to milk to help promote your growing toddler's development.</td>
</tr></table></div>
I am not transitioning him to milk though.....<br><br>
Should I go back and get the 0-12month formula?
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CanidFL</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11525723"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I forgot to ask....<br><br>
There was a choice between formula for 0-12 months and 9-24 months. Since DS is almost 10 months, I got the "toddler formula".<br><br>
But now I just read this on the can<br><br><br><br>
I am not transitioning him to milk though.....<br><br>
Should I go back and get the 0-12month formula?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I would- the toddler formula has more corn syrup for whatever reason <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Stick with the infant stuff <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br>
You should be so proud for making it 9 mos without any formula! Think of how wonderful that is for your babe <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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Toddler formula has more calories typically (could be why more CS solids, etc.). I konw DD"s "child" formula is 30 cals/oz. as opposed to the infant 20 cals/oz. I honestly don't know how much it matters if its a small amount a day??
 

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this is a cut and paste from a yahoo group I am on:<br><br>
Natural Baby Formula<br>
Adapted by Jonelle Hughes, CBE, Doula<br><br>
Commercial formula is not a pleasant substitute, as it is full of<br>
additives, and the iron it contains leaches the iron store from the<br>
babies system. However, there is an alternative solution. Homemade<br>
formula. You know what is in it, and you make it yourself! It is an<br>
excellent mix of minerals, vitamins, and other supplements. It may<br>
take extra time, as it has to be made fresh. But knowing that if your<br>
baby has to be supplemented, it might as well be the closest thing<br>
you can find. This formula was created through much research and<br>
study, and is balanced with proteins and fats in amounts that a<br>
baby's body is able to break down, without shocking the baby's<br>
system.<br><br>
Everyday, in a blender mix:<br><br>
10 oz. Fresh Goats Milk<br>
6 oz. Rice milk<br>
1 dropper of trace minerals<br>
1 t. coral calcium (which contains naturally occurring magnesium)<br>
1 T. black strap molasses<br>
1T. Flax seed oil<br>
1/8 t. Brewers Yeast<br>
1 t. liquid Vitamin C (add more when sick)<br>
1T. Liquid acidophilus<br>
1 tsp. Chlorophyll<br><br>
The above should fill 5-6 Playtex nursers. Refrigerate immediately.<br>
Make enough for only one day at a time, as flax oil will separate.<br>
Watch the child's bowel movements closely, as you will need to adjust<br>
the flax oil to avoid constipation, or diarrhea.<br><br>
Ingredients:<br>
Brewer's Yeast Great source of B complex vitamins, amino acids, and<br>
the mineral chromium. Does not aid in overgrowth of yeast as does<br>
baker's yeast.<br>
BlackStrap Molasses A very nutrient rich food, high in calcium, major<br>
source of liquid Iron, low in fat and cholesterol. Richest natural<br>
source of potassium. BSM contains the two best kinds of saccharides,<br>
poly and mono saccharides which occur in the natural state in fruits.<br>
(Black Strap Molasses is made through a process that originates with<br>
sugar cane.) It is what is called a "good sugar" because it is<br>
combined with other nutrients that react well with the bodies<br>
chemistry and absorption as opposed to refined or "white" sugar that<br>
is a simple carbohydrate, whereas molasses is a complex carbohydrate.<br>
Rice Milk High in vitamins and minerals. Contains the non-processed<br>
outerparts of rice that are the main source of nutrients. High in<br>
fiber, and a source of naturally occurring antioxidants. Nutrient<br>
balancing properties. Also acts as a dilutant to the Goat's Milk that<br>
can add too much Urea to the system.<br>
Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body. Of the two to<br>
three pounds of calcium contained in the average body, 99% is located<br>
in the bones and teeth. Calcium is needed to form bones and teeth and<br>
is also required for blood clotting, transmission of signals in nerve<br>
cells, and muscle contraction. Magnesium is needed for bone, protein,<br>
and fatty acid formation, making new cells, activating B vitamins,<br>
relaxing muscles, clotting blood, and forming the energy the body<br>
runs on. Insulin secretion and function also require magnesium. Coral<br>
calcium (above sea level) is the most superior calcium and easiest to<br>
assimilate into the body.<br>
Flax Seed Oil Flax is the richest vegetable source of Omega 3<br>
essential fatty acids. It is also the richest known source of<br>
lignans, (a class of phytonutrients that have anti-fungal, anti-<br>
bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-carcinogenic properties. It is an<br>
exceptional source of dietary fiber, both soluble, and insoluble.<br>
Flax is high in boron, a trace mineral that helps the body hold onto<br>
calcium! The National Cancer Institute has chosen flax as one of the<br>
first five primary foodstuffs for study to determine health benefits<br>
of natural foods. From the Omega 3 essential fatty acids, the body<br>
produces series 3 prostaglandin's. These act on the cellular level in<br>
a variety of disease fighting ways, that include anti-clotting<br>
actions in the blood stream, anti-inflammatory responses that<br>
alleviate or prevent such autoimmune diseases such as: arthritis,<br>
psoriasis, and asthma. They are involved in mechanisms of transport<br>
and metabolism of both cholesterol and triglycerides that result in a<br>
strong lowering effect on both of these cardiovascular factors.<br>
Series 3 prostaglandins increase vitality, energy, and stamina due to<br>
their involvement in the body's process of oxidation, which, on a<br>
cellular level, is the way molecules are broken down to produce<br>
energy. Flax Seed is rich in: Essential fatty acid Omega 3, soluble<br>
and insoluble fiber, and boron.<br>
Goat's Milk- The fat and protein globules of goats milk are smaller,<br>
finer, and more evenly distributed through the milk, resulting in a<br>
more rapid and complete breakdown by the human digestive enzymes. The<br>
tension in the curd of goats milk is only about one-third of that of<br>
cows milk. During digestion the casein forms a less tough and more<br>
friable coagulum than the cows milk casein thus enabling the<br>
digestive proteolytic enzyme to penetrate and break it down more<br>
easily. Higher levels of vitamin B and the mild laxative action of<br>
goats milk also aid the digestive process, relieving stress symptoms<br>
manifest as neurotic indigestion, constipation and insomnia. The high<br>
buffering quality of goats milk is due to its superior mineral<br>
content and enhances its value for sufferers of peptic ulcers and<br>
other such gastric complaints. The vitamin and mineral content of<br>
goats milk compares favorably with both cows milk and human milk,<br>
being closer in composition to human milk than cows milk. In fact it<br>
is also significantly higher in the growth related vitamin riboflavin<br>
and the bone minerals calcium and phosphorus. Acidophilus Probiotic<br>
bacteria favorably alter the intestinal microflora balance, inhibit<br>
the growth of harmful bacteria, promote good digestion, boost immune<br>
function, and increase resistance to infection Individuals with<br>
flourishing intestinal colonies of beneficial bacteria are better<br>
equipped to fight the growth of disease-causing bacteria. Acidophilus<br>
and bifidobacteria maintain a healthy balance of intestinal flora by<br>
producing organic compounds such as lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide,<br>
and acetic acid that increase the acidity of the intestine and<br>
inhibit the reproduction of many harmful bacteria. Probiotic bacteria<br>
also produce substances called bacteriocins, which act as natural<br>
antibiotics to kill undesirable microorganisms.<br>
Trace Minerals Several trace minerals--copper, chromium, cobalt,<br>
manganese and molybdenum--are firmly established as essential to<br>
humans. That means that you can't live without them, at least not for<br>
very long. It means that these minerals are necessary for certain<br>
vital chemical reactions in the body to occur and that no other<br>
elements can take their places. It also means that the National<br>
Research Council has developed daily intake guidelines to help you<br>
make sure that you are getting enough. Many trace minerals act as<br>
coenzymes, so-called catalysts in chemical reactions. That means they<br>
function as spark plugs, getting chemical reactions going without<br>
actually being changed in the process. That's important, because our<br>
bodies are giant laboratories, where billions of chemical reactions<br>
are taking place all of the time. Trace minerals play roles in your<br>
body's production of neurotransmitters, biochemicals that send<br>
messages through your nervous system; in the production of major<br>
hormones secreted by your thyroid and adrenal glands; and in your<br>
body's ability to burn carbohydrates and fat for energy and to weave<br>
molecules into the tissues that become your bones, blood vessels,<br>
skin and teeth. Along with other food components, trace minerals help<br>
you grow, reproduce and maintain your body over the years.<br>
Vitamin C -Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that functions as a<br>
powerful antioxidant. Acting as an antioxidant, one of vitamin C's<br>
important functions is to protect LDL cholesterol from oxidative<br>
damage. (Only when LDL is damaged, does cholesterol appear to lead to<br>
heart disease, and vitamin C may be the most important antioxidant<br>
protector of LDL). Vitamin C is also needed to make collagen, the<br>
that strengthens many parts of the body, such as muscles and blood<br>
vessels. Vitamin C also plays important roles in wound healing and as<br>
a natural antihistamine. This vitamin also aids in the formation of<br>
liver bile and helps to fight viruses and to detoxify alcohol and<br>
other substances. Recently, researchers have shown that vitamin C<br>
improves nitric oxide activity. Nitric oxide is needed for the<br>
dilation of blood vessels, potentially important in lowering blood<br>
pressure and preventing spasm of arteries in the heart that might<br>
otherwise lead to heart attacks. Vitamin C has reversed dysfunction<br>
of cells lining blood vessels The normalization of the functioning of<br>
these cells may be linked to prevention of heart disease. Vitamin C<br>
has been reported to reduce activity of the enzyme aldose reductase<br>
in people. Aldose reductase is the enzyme responsible for<br>
accumulation of sorbitol in eyes, nerves, and kidneys of people with<br>
diabetes. This accumulation is believed to be responsible for<br>
deterioration of these parts of the body associated with diabetes.<br>
Therefore, interference with the activity of aldose reductase<br>
theoretically helps protect people with diabetes.<br>
Chlorophyll is the molecule that absorbs sunlight and uses its energy<br>
to synthesize carbohydrates from CO2 and water. This process is known<br>
as photosynthesis and is the basis for sustaining the life processes<br>
of all plants. Since animals and humans obtain their food supply by<br>
eating plants, photosynthesis can be said to be the source of our<br>
life also.<br><br>
Resources: The Missing Link JAMA Studies done on the molecular<br>
structure of human breast milk in comparison to substitutes.<br>
Dr. Lendon Smith MD<br>
MotherNature.com<br>
Every Woman's Book by Paavo Airola
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies.<br><br>
I am proud to have made it 9 months while pumping at work. It’s just sad that I didn’t meet my goal of a year. I will still be pumping and breastfeeding for as long as DS wants but it will just be supplemented.<br><br>
I did go back and get the infant formula. Not sure about the toddler formula. I just have a funny feeling about it.<br><br>
I don’t have the time to make my own formula but thanks for the suggestion. Plus, some of the ingredients seem like they would be really hard to find around here.
 

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Congrats on making it so long without supplementing! I don't know anyone IRL who made it that long working and pumping w/o supplementing. Thats hard work! I would stick to baby formula if they aren't into solids yet.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/hug2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Hug2"> Did you read the "low milk supply" stickie in the BF challenges? Have you tried shatavari? That works better than fenugreek / blessed thistle for some people.<br><br>
Also, here's a hint from Kellymom about calcium for AF associated low supply:<br><br><a href="http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/natural-treatments.html#calcium" target="_blank">http://www.kellymom.com/herbal/natur...s.html#calcium</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Low milk supply associated with menstruation: Calcium/magnesium supplement<br>
Some women experience a drop in milk supply from ovulation (mid-cycle) until the first day or two of the next menstrual period. A woman's blood calcium levels gradually decrease during this period of time, and for some women the drop in blood calcium causes a drop in milk supply. For women who have this problem, calcium/magnesium supplements may be helpful. This practice has also been reported to eliminate most uterine cramping and some premenstrual discomfort such as water retention.<br><br>
The recommended calcium supplement dosage is between 500 mg calcium/250 mg magnesium and 1500 mg calcium/750 mg magnesium (the higher dosage is generally more effective). Calcium dosages this high should not be taken alone, but as a calcium/magnesium (or calcium/magnesium/zinc) combination. Otherwise the calcium will not be adequately absorbed into your body. The amount of supplement depends on the composition of your diet -- the more animal protein, the more calcium/magnesium needed. If you are a vegetarian or vegan, the lower dosage may work fine for you.<br><br>
Start the supplement when you ovulate, and continue through the first few days of your menstrual period. If periods are irregular, then begin calcium/magnesium at 14 days after the beginning of your last menstrual cycle, or simply take the supplement every day.<br></td>
</tr></table></div>
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wow that makes sense. I get really bad migraines around AF time and I have read it can be caused by low magnesium. I think I will try taking a supplement this cycle.<br><br>
Thanks for the hugs.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CanidFL</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11540271"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Thanks for the replies.<br><br>
I am proud to have made it 9 months while pumping at work. It’s just sad that I didn’t meet my goal of a year. I will still be pumping and breastfeeding for as long as DS wants but it will just be supplemented.<br><br>
I did go back and get the infant formula. Not sure about the toddler formula. I just have a funny feeling about it.<br><br>
I don’t have the time to make my own formula but thanks for the suggestion. Plus, some of the ingredients seem like they would be really hard to find around here.</div>
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You did good, mama. You did good, and you should be proud. And you're still doing wonderfully by continuing to breastfeed your son! OK, yes, he's not getting exclusively breastmilk, but he's getting a lot of it, and you're doing the very best that you can, which is all you can do, you know?<br><br>
Don't be down, really. It is hard being a working mama (I myself work outside the home and had to pump with my first and will be pumping again soon when I return to work after my maternity leave with DD). It is very hard to keep up with baby's demands, even if you have a regular pumping schedule, a great supply and an understanding workplace.<br><br>
I'm just sending a hug and a big kudos to you for doing such a terrific job.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>CanidFL</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11525723"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I forgot to ask....<br><br>
There was a choice between formula for 0-12 months and 9-24 months. Since DS is almost 10 months, I got the "toddler formula".<br><br>
But now I just read this on the can<br><br><br><br>
I am not transitioning him to milk though.....<br><br>
Should I go back and get the 0-12month formula?</div>
</td>
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The regular infant formulas don't use corn syrup. (special ones for lactose intolerance do though - Enfamil Gentlease, for example) There was just a thread in the Breastfeeding Challenges board about "When Formula Becomes necessary" and there were recommendations on there for an organic formula that is cheaper than the commercial stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I will check out that thread and see what the brand was. We are tight on money so I got a generic brand and it does not have corn syrup. It has vegetable oil though.<br><br>
The organic ones I was looking at were really $$$ like $10-$15 more a can.<br><br>
I'm not trying to be super cheap with my child.....it's just that money is SO tight right now and since it's only 1 bottle a day, I feel like it's ok to get what we can afford.
 

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I know this might sound horrible, and I am not in your shoes....<br><br>
But $10-15 dollars more per can for Organic formula isn't that bad. Specially at one bottle per day, I'm sure that can would last 1-2 months. I'm sure you could easily spend less on something for this month (hoping your supply comes back in really strong after some supplements) like less on coffee, or wine, or movies or something. Carpool with someone for the month instead of full price gas money.<br><br>
I feel so strongly about Organic everything (Specially his FIRST 'food' other than breastmilk), that I wish I could send you $15 to cover the costs.<br><br>
Look into it, this is your babies food to help him grow, make it the best you can afford. I don't mean to sound rude, I know what it is like to be poor. Ask someone to help you if you cannot afford it yourself.<br><br>
And serisously, if you cannot afford it PM me, and I will send you money. I kid you not. People are willing to help if you ask.
 

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I could have written your post! Yesterday I needed to start formula because my freezer is empty. My period started very early and I also have PCOS symptoms, so I have struggled to pump enough (even with pumping in evening and weekends).<br>
With my DD I had to supplement at 5 months already so I am proud that with DS I made it to >10 months without formula. And you should too!!<br><br>
Carma
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you for the kind offer Hesperia <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"><br><br>
I don’t see it as rude at all because there is no way for you to know our financial situation. We really are going into the negatives every month with DH in school and only my income. We live in the worst area of town (I don’t walk outside alone ever). There is no cutting out the wine/coffee/movies in our house because we haven’t done those in over 15 months lol. We are on the bare bones minimum. This weekend, I could have chosen between 10 hamburger helpers for $10 on sale or 3 organic apples for $10. I chose the hamburger helper so we can have 20 meals instead of 3 snacks (we eat leftovers). It sucks but that is the reality.<br><br>
Plus, I’m not sure if this is true but the formula can says to throw out after 1 month of opening it. So it may last a few months at 1 bottle per day but I guess it goes bad after a month…..<br><br>
Anywho…I still have to check out that thread the pp was talking about where you can get organic for cheaper.
 

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You might not be comfortable with this idea, but have you considered using donor milk. There is a website that gets moms in touch with other moms who have extra they want to donate. I think it is milkshare.com.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mommylovesra</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11553057"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You might not be comfortable with this idea, but have you considered using donor milk. There is a website that gets moms in touch with other moms who have extra they want to donate. I think it is milkshare.com.</div>
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I am ok with the idea but DH is not. We have had the conversation a few times and he just can’t wrap his head around it.
 

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There have been a lot of good responses to this post but I just wanted to reply in commiseration. I'm a WOHM as well, started out with a huge freezer stash, had a great milk supply, thought I would never run out of milk...DD is 8 mos now and the freezer is looking kind of bare. I don't know about you, but I'm also getting pretty sick of pumping 3x per day, especially as people at work start to expect me to get back to going on business trips, etc. Like you, I hate the idea of putting DD on formula, even to supplement.<br><br>
BUT...just think about all the benefits your baby has gotten from breastfeeding this long. So many people don't even make it a week. Don't be too hard on yourself.<br><br>
ETA: And your baby will still keep getting the benefit from whatever amount of breastmilk he is getting, even if he has some formula too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Frisbee</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/11554942"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">There have been a lot of good responses to this post but I just wanted to reply in commiseration. I'm a WOHM as well, started out with a huge freezer stash, had a great milk supply, thought I would never run out of milk...DD is 8 mos now and the freezer is looking kind of bare. I don't know about you, but I'm also getting pretty sick of pumping 3x per day, especially as people at work start to expect me to get back to going on business trips, etc. Like you, I hate the idea of putting DD on formula, even to supplement.<br><br>
BUT...just think about all the benefits your baby has gotten from breastfeeding this long. So many people don't even make it a week. Don't be too hard on yourself.<br><br>
ETA: And your baby will still keep getting the benefit from whatever amount of breastmilk he is getting, even if he has some formula too!</div>
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Thank you! And yes….I feel guilty saying it but I am so sick of pumping. I keep looking at the calendar and thinking “How many more months will this be necessary?” It is annoying and people are starting to make comments when they see me go into the storage closet like “oh you’re still doing that? Shouldn’t he be done by now?”<br><br>
And yes….my company has already sent me onto 2 out of town business things. Luckily, my DH is flexible and was able to come with DS so I could still feed him on lunch and during the night.<br><br>
But you are right and we should be proud of ourselves. Our babies getting all that milk exclusively really benefited them and they will still be getting milk.<br><br>
I am hoping to stop pumping around a year but who knows…..things change so quickly with a baby.
 
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