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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I originally joined this site as a teenager looking for a place to vent. I am a cut male, and now a little older have been able to heal old wounds, (so to speak...) but also had the chance to gain a bit of perspective on my own perspective. And I just wanted to share something here. If this is in the wrong place, please feel free to move it. I just felt after all the help this site gave me when I was younger, this would be a good place to post this:

He knew nothing of what could be, but only what couldn't. Locked into the perspective of what the knife had done, what it had limited him to, his manhood, his sense of self was diminished into the perspective of what his cutter wanted him to be. More than his sexual ability, more than the tribal nature of it all- his cut locked him into the world view of a culture that cuts. That THIS was what was good, and what was good, was for him to have less of himself- to not be what's natural- but what is socially demanded. In this world, his native sense of sense was foreign, how he was born was deemed ugly and "extra". To be what he became was to submit to something he wasn't, but also to not consider what was done to him as submission. This world view was to view the altered, the diminished- as normal. So he instead existed between worlds. Not all too comfortable with what they made him, but also unaware of what he fully was. He existed in an indescribable place to anyone who wasn't born there. Because birth is where you gain your sense of self. For many that evolves from a point of realization of what was always there since utero. But for him and many men in America, birth was the moment the knife cut through skin and what they became was not what they were, but what they were forced to be.
 

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You write a lot more eloquently than I am capable of doing.

Your last line is the most poignant as it describes the place that the North American medical community, and by extension, society has forced them to be. An untenable place that most circumcised males deny that they are in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
And the sad part is its not even a place cut men consciously deny. Its built into our society, a message sent out to every boy in cutting culture. It took me 10 years after I realized that circ existed to actually fully (mostly) shaking off the cultural brain washing. It wasn't till 15 where I actually thought "wait, this ISNT normal. This is a really weird, random cultural practice thats no more obscure or odd than foot binding, or stretching out lips with wooden disks in african tribes.

The point of what I wrote is to point out this isn't just about a physical cut, its the culture behind it. A culture that has told men and boys how they should feel about their bodies, how they are told to devalue parts of themselves and the bodies of the other males in their own culture. Because if we truly respected the male body, if I man could easily free themselves of the shackles of cultural subjugation they would never cut their son. Because a father already loves and respects his son, and would never cut off a part of his body that he thought his son could ever find value in.

We are fighting a battle against cultural brainwashing. I actively fought against it myself, and yet it took YEARS to see what my culture had done to me interns of how I perceive my own body. I wish more of the intactivist movement would focus on this.
 

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Beautifully written! It's an American idea that we are a free nation and that everything we do is wonderful. We look down on countries that circumcise women. We wonder how they could possibly think it's okay to do something so heinous. Cognitive dissonance, amiright??? We've disguised cutting culture as a cure all, but the good news is that parents are becoming more informed and more men are speaking out about it.
 
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